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2021 BA 500 Draft Rankings

The BA 500 is an attempt to capture the industry’s consensus on the talent of the 2021 draft class—not to predict where players will be selected. The list was compiled in consultation with major league scouts, front office executives, scouting directors, college coaches and other professional evaluators. Ben Badler, Alexis Brudnicki, Teddy Cahill, JJ Cooper, Kyle Glaser, Joe Healy, Bill Mitchell, Chris Trenkle and Carlos Collazo contributed to the reporting and writing. Mark Chiarelli, Josh Norris and Chris Trenkle contributed to editing.

By Carlos Collazo

Well, it’s finally here—the 2021 BA 500!

No, we’re not late, but this is the deepest into the calendar year we have ever released the BA 500, as the 2021 draft is the first to be moved into July and tied to the MLB All-Star Break.

Baseball has largely put Covid-19 behind it this spring, but the 2021 draft class has still felt the ripple effects of the pandemic. While it won’t be remembered as the Covid draft in the same way the five-round 2020 draft last year will be, there’s an argument to be made that the 2021 draft class is equally impacted by the virus—if not more so.

Scouts wondered if that would be the case a year ago, as Covid largely blew up the summer evaluation period for scouts and players alike, especially amongst the college ranks. No Collegiate National Team. No Cape Cod League. No 18U National Team. While many high school events took place in the South, players from the West Coast were more limited in their options and scouts themselves had to miss events entirely due to personnel restrictions (and in some cases layoffs) and further step into the world of video scouting by writing reports remotely.

That dynamic has led to plenty of volatility during the season as players who previously didn't have a chance to establish a track record or baseline of performance stood out, and others with some history struggled. Teams are now left to try and sort out the signal from the noise by more heavily relying on area scouts and their history and/or adjusting their models to incorporate a much smaller sample of college stats.

Those factors—on top of the exceptional depth of the 2021 class thanks to the five-round draft last year that brought back many players who would have been drafted in a typical year—have led to less consensus on the class than ever.

“This year I have no expectations because it is so wide open,” said one scouting director. “When I walk into that draft room the night of the draft I wouldn’t be surprised if it was completely all over the place in terms of where guys go. Just not a lot of consensus.”

There’s not a consensus No. 1 player in the class and instead a group of five players are generally seen as the top tier of talent. That group includes toolsy prep shortstops Jordan Lawlar and Marcelo Mayer, renowned Vanderbilt righthanders Jack Leiter and Kumar Rocker and Louisville catcher Henry Davis, who was one of the best performers of the season.

After a full spring, the high school class looks more impressive than the college group. The 2021 class has a chance to be one of the best prep shortstop classes we’ve ever seen, with four potential top-10 picks at the position and a slew of intriguing depth options as well. Outside of the shortstops there is a bounty of up-the-middle position players with unusually impressive athleticism and tools.

The high school pitching group, led by righthanders Jackson Jobe and Andrew Painter, seems close to average, with several legitimate first-round talents and perhaps more lefthanded pitching depth than in an average class.

Scouting departments were worried about the college hitting class entering the year, but there was hope that throughout the spring players would step forward and make it at least average. That doesn’t appear to have been the case. Most evaluators see the college hitters as the weakest demographic of the group—with a notable absence of shortstops and corner profiles with power—and it’s a solidly below-average college hitting class overall.

The college pitching saw attrition during the season as potential top-10 players like Gunnar Hoglund and Jaden Hill suffered season-ending injuries, but the group seems solid or a tick above-average on talent—but significantly below-average in terms of innings and established track record.

Overall, the 2021 class seems weaker than teams would prefer at the very top, but with elite depth that might leave organizations more excited with their draftees on Days Two and Three than in a typical year.

We will continue to make tweaks and adjust the BA 500 as necessary as we get closer to draft day.

*BA Grades and Tool Grades — We’re excited to roll out BA Grades and tool grades for the top 200 players in the class for the first time. BA readers familiar with the Prospect Handbook should be familiar with these grades, which are based on the 20-80 scouting scale. Our attempt is to provide a deeper understanding of the class in a quantifiable manner and to also make it easier for readers to have a rough estimate of where a player might rank within a team’s Top 30 once they are drafted. Please note that all player grades and tool grades are future grades, not present grades.

**Rapscores — 85% of Baseball America’s Top 500 MLB prospects use Rapsodo data for player development and evaluation. In collaboration with Driveline Baseball, Rapsodo developed RapScore as a standard scale for scouting and recruiting. Utilizing the principles of the 20-80 scale and the verified data collected by Rapsodo’s technology, RapScore provides a quantifiable way to compare athletes of all ages. Players that complete a Rapsodo Certified Assessment receive a RapScore and are listed on the Rapsodo National Player Database.

27 Matches
See Full List Expand Collapse All Updated on: 7/5/2021
  1. 16
    Last: 16

    Michael McGreevy

    UC Santa Barbara RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.0

    BA Grade: 55 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 60 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 50 | Control: 70

    McGreevy caught scouts’ attention in high school with a velocity spike at the end of his senior year, but his short track record and questions about his signability allowed him to get to campus at UC Santa Barbara. He starred immediately for the Gauchos, earning Freshman All-America honors as a multi-inning reliever before moving into the rotation as a sophomore and posting a 0.99 ERA before the coronavirus pandemic shut down the season. McGreevy picked up where he left off in 2021, assuming the Friday night starter’s role for UCSB and emerging as the best college pitcher on the West Coast. He went 9-1, 2.92 with 109 strikeouts and 10 walks in 95.2 innings during the regular season. A standout shortstop in high school, McGreevy is an excellent athlete who fills up the strike zone with four pitches. His fastball sits 91-93 mph and touches 95-96 with sink and finish to his arm side. His low-80s curveball with downer action flashes plus, and his mid-80s slider and changeup each project as average to slightly above. McGreevy stands out most for his control. He is an elite strike-thrower who walked only 30 batters in 183.1 career innings at UCSB and projects to have plus-plus control, with evaluators noting his misses are smaller than former Gaucho and reigning American League Cy Young Award winner Shane Bieber’s were at the same age. McGreevy locates his fastball to both sides of the plate, lands all three of his secondary pitches for strikes and works quickly and efficiently. With a strong, durable body at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds and an athletic, repeatable delivery, McGreevy holds his stuff deep into games and is a no-doubt starting pitcher. Most see him as a potential mid-rotation starter, but he’s young for the class at only 20 and is a candidate to take a jump in an organization with a strong player development team.
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  2. 21
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    Will Taylor

    Dutch Fork HS, Irmo, S.C. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 175 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Clemson
    Age At Draft: 18.5

    BA Grade: 55 | Risk: Extreme
    Hit: 55 | Power: 45 | Run: 70 | Field: 60 | Arm: 55

    Clemson routinely turns out professional athletes, but it’s perhaps a bit more rare for the program to have not one, but two commits to the football program who are also potential first-round talents on the baseball field. That’s the case this year with Taylor and Georgia two-way player Bubba Chandler. Taylor is a three-star athlete, according to 247Sports, and has gotten interest from Clemson as a quarterback and slot receiver, in addition to being a standout high school wrestler. Taylor jumped on draft boards in a big way last summer when he was arguably the most impressive performer at East Coast Pro, standing out for his running ability and hitting performance. He clocked a 6.45-second 60-yard dash and is a double-plus runner, and he also showed an ability to square up velocity and sit back and drive offspeed stuff. Taylor gets a bit rigid in his swing at times, but he has shown bat speed, the ability to manipulate the barrel and a line-drive approach that suits his running ability. Scouts think he has a chance to be an above-average hitter with the speed to profile as a leadoff type. His power is the one tool that evaluators question. It’s below-average now, but Taylor did add strength to his 6-foot, 175-pound frame over the offseason and could continue to get more physical in the future but barring a significant development in that area in addition to a more leveraged swing, he’s unlikely to be a huge power threat. Taylor will take some inconsistent routes in the outfield currently, but he has the running ability, foot speed and explosion to develop into a plus defensive center fielder, with above-average arm strength on top of it. The teams highest on Taylor’s hitting ability and swing likely have him as a first-round talent, but most of the industry sees him as a top-50 type in a class that gets fairly jumbled beyond the first 20 players. His football and baseball commitment to Clemson could complicate things depending on where he lands.
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    Benny Montgomery

    Red Land HS, Lewisberry, Pa. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Virginia
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    BA Grade: 55 | Risk: Extreme
    Hit: 40 | Power: 55 | Run: 80 | Field: 60 | Arm: 60

    Montgomery's high school games drew huge crowds of club officials, who left with their scouting cards filled with 60s and 70s on his tool grades. His combination of athleticism, outstanding tools and physical upside is hard to top in this year's draft, though it's a profile that comes with risk due to his hitting ability. At 6-foot-4, 195 pounds, Montgomery has a tall, sleek frame with plenty of room to continue filling out while staying lean and athletic. He's a 70 runner with a plus arm, projecting to stick in center field where he has long, gliding strides and good closing speed on balls hit into the gaps. At the plate, Montgomery's bat speed ranks among the best in the class. He shows plus raw power in batting practice, and as he matures physically, that power might jump another grade. The upside is obvious and exciting, but many clubs have reservations about Montgomery's ability to make it all click against live pitching. Montgomery has cleaned up his swing some since last year, doing a better job of staying back and keeping his front hip closed. He's still a long-armed hitter with a hitch in his swing, with a lack of timing and balance that add risks to his hitting ability and cut into his ability to translate his power in games. But the minute Montgomery signs, he will be one of the toolsiest players in his organization. Teams that value more refined hitting skills will have Montgomery lower than where he's ranked here, while teams that prioritize raw tools and athleticism will have him pushed up their boards. Other premium athlete high school center fielders with a hit risk like Bubba Starling, Donavan Tate, Lewis Brinson and Bubba Thompson were all first-round picks and some of them went top-five overall. Montgomery won't go in the top five, but he should follow their path as a first-rounder, with some expecting him to be the first high school outfielder off the board.
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  4. 39
    Last: 40

    Matt Mikulski

    Fordham LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.2
    RapScore: 47

    BA Grade: 50 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 60 | Curveball: 40 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 50

    Undrafted last year, Mikulski returned to Fordham for his senior year and his stock has climbed considerably after he changed his mechanics, improved his stuff and dominated the Atlantic 10. His 1.45 ERA led the league and ranked sixth in the country, he struck out a league-high 124 batters in 68.1 innings and his 16.3 K/9 ranked first in the nation. Coming into the season, Mikulski shortened his arm action and increased his velocity, as he now sits at 92-95 mph with a peak of 98. He hides the ball behind his chest with his short, abrupt arm path before the ball pops out from behind his ear, so the deception in his delivery helps his already strong fastball play up because it jumps on hitters faster than they expect. It also helps him disguise his offspeed stuff, though scouts are split on determining his best secondary pitch. Some prefer his slider, which flashes as an average pitch, though it's often more of a fringe-average offering. His 83-86 mph changeup is the pitch with his highest swing-and-miss rate. The action on his changeup doesn't stand out, but he disguises it well out of his hand and he executes it down in the zone consistently to get empty swings from hitters who have to be ready for his mid-90s fastball. Mikulski also flips in a get-me-over, below-average curveball as an early-count pitch. Mikulski is 22 with more control than tight command and an unorthodox delivery that adds to the concerns of several scouts that his long-term role might be in the bullpen, while others see a potential mid-rotation starter trending up.
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  5. 44
    Last: 45

    Thatcher Hurd

    Mira Costa HS, Manhattan Beach, Calif. RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: UCLA
    Age At Draft: 18.6
    RapScore: 43

    BA Grade: 55 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 60 | Slider: 55 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 60

    Hurd was primarily a catcher as an underclassman at Acalanes High in Northern California, but he switched to pitching and jumped on scouts’ radars with a star turn at the Perfect Game National Showcase last summer. He transferred to Mira Costa High outside of Los Angeles for his senior year and separated himself as one of the top prep pitchers in Southern California, starring at showcases throughout the fall and winter before turning in a strong senior spring. Hurd is a projectable 6-foot-4, 205-pound righthander with a chance for four above-average or better pitches. His fastball sits 88-92 mph and touches 94 out of a clean delivery and arm action and should tick up as he fills out his frame. He complements his fastball with a plus curveball in the mid 70s with downer action and a 78-80 mph slider that shows the potential to be a swing-and-miss pitch as he adds finish to it. He rounds out his arsenal with an above-average changeup. Hurd will fall in love with his breaking balls too much at times, but when he pitches off of his fastball, he cruises. Despite being relatively new to pitching, Hurd shows exceptional command and locates all of his pitches in the strike zone. He’s an astute and inquisitive learner who constantly seeks information on how to get better. Hurd will command a sizable bonus to forgo his UCLA commitment. With four solid pitches, a projectable frame, advanced command and a fresh arm, most teams are willing to pay it.
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  6. 57
    Last: 58

    Gage Jump

    JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 180 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: UCLA
    Age At Draft: 18.3
    RapScore: 41

    BA Grade: 55 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 60 | Curveball: 60 | Changeup: 50 | Control: 50

    Jump entered the year as one of several highly-touted players on a loaded JSerra (Calif.) High team that included shortstop Cody Schrier and righthanders Eric Silva and Luke Jewett. After impressing on the showcase circuit last summer and fall, Jump’s stuff ticked up this spring to solidify himself as the best of the bunch. Jump is an undersized lefthander at 5-foot-11, 180 pounds, but his stuff plays bigger than his size. He pitches at 91-92 mph, can reach for 93-94 mph at any time and began touching 95-96 for the first time this spring. He pitches effectively at the top of the zone with his fastball to make it a plus pitch that gets lots of swings and misses. Batters don’t see his fastball well and rarely make contact against it. Jump complements his fastball with a plus, downer curveball in the mid 70s that also draws swings and misses. He also throws a changeup that flashes plus but is inconsistent and shows feel for a nascent cutter in the low 80s. Jump’s size and arm action result in some effort in his delivery, which leads to inconsistent command and control. His fastball will occasionally sail on him, but he is an aggressive competitor who pounds the strike zone when he’s on. Jump’s size and delivery create questions about whether he can remain a starter. Most teams project him to relief, where his stuff and mentality invite comparisons to similar-sized lefties who became dominant closers. He is committed to UCLA.
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  7. 64
    Last: 65
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 230 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Reds '17 (12)
    Age At Draft: 22.7
    RapScore: 50

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 50 | Curveball: 50 | Slider: 45 | Changeup: 50 | Control: 60

    Mace was draft-eligible in the 2020 class, where he ranked as the No. 75 prospect but reportedly turned down big money to go back to Florida to try and improve his draft stock. He added good weight and improved the velocity of his fastball a tick or two, sitting in the 93 mph range this spring and touching 97. Scouts critiqued the life on Mace’s fastball last season, and this spring they’ve seen him try and throw more four-seam fastballs, but he still doesn’t get a ton of swings and misses with the pitch. Instead, he relies on spotting it at a high level in each quadrant of the strike zone. Mace also throws a hard slider/cutter in the mid-to-upper 80s, a slurvy 78-80 mph curveball and a mid-to-upper-80s changeup with slight arm-side fade. None of Mace’s secondary pitches projects as plus and his lack of bat-missing stuff makes scouts wonder about his true upside, though he did achieve a career-best strikeout rate (11.3 K/9) through 90.1 innings this spring, while still walking just 2.1 batters per nine. Mace has given up close to a hit per inning over his Florida career, so he’ll likely have to rely on inducing weak contact at the next level and avoiding walks barring a jump forward in his secondary stuff. Sinker/slider types aren’t the most coveted in today’s game, but Mace has enough pitching ability to become a back-of-the-rotation arm.
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  8. 80
    Last: 81

    Brendan Beck

    Stanford RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 190 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.8
    RapScore: 47

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 45 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 55

    The younger brother of Giants pitching prospect Tristan Beck, Brendan spent four seasons in Stanford’s rotation and blossomed into one of the top pitchers in the Pac-12 Conference this spring. He went 7-1, 3.03 and finished tied for the conference lead with 106 strikeouts through the end of the regular season. Beck was previously known as a command-oriented righthander with fringy stuff, but his velocity jumped this spring to enhance his future outlook. After sitting 88-92 mph in past years, he began working 91-96 mph and set new career highs in strikeouts per nine (11.1) and opponent average (.188). Beck’s best attribute remains his feel to pitch. He has impressive command of four pitches, stays on the attack and is exceptionally poised on the mound. His mid-80s changeup is an above-average pitch he is comfortable throwing to righties or lefties in any count, his low-80s slider is an average offering that gets swings and misses and his curveball is a usable fourth offering in the upper 70s. He effectively mixes his pitches to keep hitters guessing and ties everything together with above-average control. Beck is rarely fazed on the mound and has a tendency to step up in big moments. He is a good athlete with a strong, durable frame and lasts deep into his starts. Beck’s velocity uptick has pushed him into top-three rounds consideration for some teams. He projects as a back-of-the-rotation starter who has a chance to be more.
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  9. 87
    Last: 88

    Braylon Bishop

    Arkansas HS, Texarkana, Ark. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 176 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Arkansas
    Age At Draft: 18.2
    RapScore: 47

    BA Grade: 50 | Risk: Extreme
    Hit: 40 | Power: 60 | Run: 60 | Field: 50 | Arm: 50

    Bishop has long been viewed as one of the players to watch in the 2021 high school draft class. He has well above-average bat speed, plus speed in the outfield (he’s consistently been timed at 6.6-6.65 seconds in the 60-yard dash) and plus raw power. What leaves scouts a little leery of taking him in the first two rounds are worries about his ability to hit for average and make consistent contact. He added some noise to his load in his swing during the summer of 2020. That turned what had been a pretty simple swing into one that could generate more power thanks to a bigger hand pump. That power came at the expense of a slower trigger that led to some swing-and-miss issues against top-notch competition, although his excellent bat speed and hand strength give him a solid base to build on as a hitter. The 6-foot, 176-pound Bishop is also a constant threat on the basepaths as he uses his plus speed well. An excellent athlete, Bishop was also Arkansas High’s quarterback and safety in football, and also finished fourth in the state in the triple jump as a senior. The Arkansas signee should be able to stay in center field, although his routes could improve. He has an average arm.
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  10. 94
    Last: 95

    Isaiah Thomas

    Vanderbilt OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 190 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Rockies '18 (39)
    Age At Draft: 21.3
    RapScore: 66

    BA Grade: 50 | Risk: Extreme
    Hit: 45 | Power: 55 | Run: 60 | Field: 55 | Arm: 55

    Going back to his high school days at Benjamin High in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., scouts have been excited about Thomas’ tool set and upside. There have always been questions about his ability to get to those tools in games, however, but this spring Thomas turned in a productive season with a .337/.396/.648 slash line, including 13 home runs and 12 stolen bases in 12 tries through his first 51 games. Thomas is a good athlete with above-average running ability, arm strength and raw power out of a 6-foot-3, 215-pound frame. The ball jumps off his bat with impressive pop on easy, graceful swings, but Thomas has always been a high-strikeout, low-walk player. This spring he struck out in 26% of his plate appearances and walked in just 4% of his trips to the plate. That puts a lot of pressure on his pure hitting ability, which is fringy at best. Thomas expands the zone and swings and misses at a decent clip, particularly against breaking balls and offspeed offerings. He does have the bat speed to catch up to high-end velocity and posted an OPS over 1.100 against 93 mph or harder pitches this spring, according to Synergy. Defensively, he’s probably a corner outfielder but some scouts want to see how he looks in center field given his running ability and athleticism. He didn’t get a chance to play there this spring given the presence of Enrique Bradfield, but some teams could start him there at the next level.
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  11. 106
    Last: 107

    Philip Abner

    Charlotte Christian HS LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 220 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Florida
    Age At Draft: 19.2
    RapScore: 39

    BA Grade: 50 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 45 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 50

    A filled-out, 6-foot-1, 220-pound lefthander, Abner stands out for his physicality and fastball command. Last summer Abner sat in the 90-93 mph range, touching 94-95 and showing an impressive ability to spot the pitch consistently, especially to his glove side, to dominate hitters. He was a candidate this spring to take a jump, but after dealing with turf toe and missing some time, he’s generally shown the same sort of stuff. Scouts have seen him in the 92-94 mph range with some feel to land a breaking ball. He also throws a changeup in the low-to-mid 80s that has impressive diving life and looks like a pitch that can be effective against righties and lefties. Abner has thrown both a curveball and a slider, and the two pitches blend together and get slurvy at times. Scouts prefer the harder variant in the 82-84 mph range, which shows some late bite when he hits on it. Abner has a long arm-hooking action in the back of his delivery, which could inhibit his ability to get to a consistent breaking ball, and it also causes some scouts to wonder if he’s more of a reliever than a starter in the long run. Scouts who like his strong frame, three-pitch mix and chance to start might prefer him in the second or third round, but a Florida commitment could make him a tough sign. Abner will be 19 on draft day and eligible in two seasons if he makes it to campus.
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  12. 116
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    Troy Melton

    San Diego State RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 20.6
    RapScore: 47

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 50 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 45 | Control: 40

    Melton bounced between pitching, catching and playing first and third base in high school. Once he got to San Diego State and focused solely on pitching, his stuff jumped to make him one of the more intriguing pitchers in the draft class. Melton is an athletic 6-foot-4 righthander who is young for the class (he will be 20 on draft day) and is still growing into his body. His fastball sits 92-95 mph and touches 97, and he has the frame, athleticism and arm speed to project for more velocity to come. He shows feel to spin an average curveball in the mid 70s and a short, mid-80s slider that flashes average with late break. His firm changeup is a fringy fourth offering. Melton’s raw stuff and athleticism excite, but his fastball plays down due to a lack of deception. He surrendered a 6.14 ERA and allowed a .291 opponent average during the regular season despite playing in a pitcher-friendly home park because batters see the ball early out of his glove and can track it throughout his delivery. His long arm action also gives him trouble repeating his release point. Melton’s youth, athleticism and arm strength appeal to teams who believe they can fix his issues by making mechanical changes to add deception and shorten his arm action. He projects to go early on the draft’s second day despite his performance.
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  13. 121
    Last: 122

    Eric Silva

    JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: UCLA
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 60 | Slider: 55 | Changeup: 45 | Control: 50

    Silva teamed with Gage Jump to give JSerra (Calif.) High one of the best high school pitching duos in the country this spring. After impressing during the fall with the Braves scout team, Silva touched 97 mph in a high-profile exhibition in the spring to enhance his draft stock and continued to pitch well throughout the high school season. Silva is a small-framed righthander who is undersized, but his stuff is plenty big. His fastball sits at 90-94 mph and touches 97 out of a clean delivery, and his fast arm speed allows him to reach that velocity without much effort. He throws his fastball for strikes and maintains his command deep into his starts. Silva complements his heater with a short slider in the low 80s that flashes above-average, and he occasionally throws a changeup in the mid 80s that is a little too firm. Silva stays in and around the zone and has impressive pitchability in addition to his stuff. Evaluators have concerns about Silva’s long-term durability with his size and how hard he throws. He began this season sitting 93-97 but tired as the year went on and finished sitting 90-93. Those concerns have many teams projecting Silva to the bullpen as a pro, although a few give him an outside chance to remain a starter. He is committed to UCLA and will be expensive to sign.
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  14. 126
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    Tyler McDonough

    North Carolina State 2B/OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-10 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.3

    BA Grade: 40 | Risk: High
    Hit: 50 | Power: 50 | Run: 55 | Field: 50 | Arm: 50

    McDonough rated as the No. 283 player in the 2020 class but went undrafted and headed back to North Carolina State for his third season, where for the third time he hit over .300 and continued to add more in-game power to his game. Listed at 5-foot-10, 180 pounds, McDonough doesn’t jump out at you with loud tools, but he’s become a player who scouts appreciate the more they watch him. He does everything on the field at a high level and is the sort of skilled gamer who area scouts are drawn to. McDonough controls the zone well, doesn’t swing and miss much and takes his share of walks, and this season he hit a career-high 15 homers. Scouts have said those homers have come with a longer swing and more aggressive hacks, and his 17% strikeout rate was the highest of his career, which shows a slight shift in his approach. McDonough has spread his homers all over the field and his exit velocities are impressive for a player of his size, so perhaps solid power will be part of his game at the next level as well. McDonough has spent most of his time in center field for the Wolfpack, but he has the defensive versatility to play all over the place, including second base, third base and perhaps even shortstop in a pinch. He’s a better runner underway than he is out of the box and went 30-for-36 (83%) over his career in stolen base attempts. McDonough has plenty of promising statistical indicators and he could go off the board in the second-to-fourth-round range.
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    Last: 129

    Drew Gray

    IMG Academy, Bradenton, Fla. LHP/OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 190 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Arkansas
    Age At Draft: 18.2

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 60 | Curveball: 55 | Slider: 50 | Changeup: 40 | Control: 40

    Gray would have ranked as the top prep prospect in Illinois this spring if he hadn’t transferred to IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., where he was able to play better competition and be scouted much more heavily with one of the more talented prep teams in the country. Gray is committed to Arkansas—where his brother Evan currently plays—as a two-way player, but his pro upside is greater on the mound. His stuff made a jump last summer and he now throws a fastball in the 90-94 mph range with big spin rates (2600-2700 rpm) that allows the pitch to generate plenty of whiffs up in the zone. The pitch looks like a potential plus offering when Gray spots it up in the zone, but he will occasionally get out of sync with his lower and upper half, and he also is more erratic in his command at the higher range of his velocity. Gray throws two breaking balls, including a mid-70s downer curve with top-to-bottom shape that looks like a potential chase pitch. His other breaking ball is a slider in the low 80s with more sweeping action. Gray will need to refine his control a bit more to make the most of his stuff, but with a still projectable, 6-foot-3, 190-pound frame he has room for more in the tank in the future.
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  16. 139
    Last: 140

    Thomas DiLandri

    Palo Verde HS, Las Vegas OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Texas Christian
    Age At Draft: 18.5
    RapScore: 65

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: Extreme
    Hit: 40 | Power: 60 | Run: 60 | Field: 45 | Arm: 55

    DiLandri is one of the toolsiest players currently outside the upper-echelon of the 2021 high school class. He had a strong summer showcase season, but observers wanted to see more out of him during his senior high school season. A 6-foot-3, 195-pound outfielder, DiLandri is a plus athlete who has premier bat speed, running ability, arm strength and raw power. He’s a plus runner and has the natural tools to stick in center field, but he will need to improve his routes and jumps to continue in the middle of the outfield. He might be a better fit in right field where his arm will work. There are some pure bat-to-ball questions which could limit his ability to tap into his plus raw power, but DiLandri did simplify his swing last summer and showed better contact ability at the Area Code Games than he did previously. His swing still gets out on the front side and he’s jumpy and not entirely comfortable in the batter’s box. Scouts would also like to see more energy and enthusiasm from DiLandri on the field. Committed to Texas Christian, DiLandri is considered unsignable, meaning that his name may not be called this year.
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  17. 158
    Last: 159

    Larson Kindreich

    Biola (Calif.) LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 210 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.1
    RapScore: 51

    BA Grade: 45 | Risk: Extreme
    Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 50 | Changeup: 60 | Control: 45

    Kindreich first jumped on scouts' radars as a projectable lefthander with velocity to come at the Area Code Games in high school. He grew into that promise at Biola (Calif.) and established himself as the top Division II player in the draft class with a standout showing in the Northwoods League last summer. Kindreich has an appealing pitcher’s frame at 6-foot-4, 210 pounds and sits 92-94 mph from the left side. His changeup is a potential plus pitch and he shows feel to spin a potentially average curveball that has flashed higher. Kindreich has a starter’s frame and repertoire, but his control and velocity have been inconsistent throughout his career and his performance this spring was underwhelming. He posted a 3.83 ERA against poor Div. II competition and allowed four or more runs in half of his starts. His fastball velocity dropped into the 80s at one point in the middle of the season, but he rebounded to return to the low 90s at the end of the year. Kindreich’s pure stuff fits in the top five rounds, but concerns about his control and performance have him just outside of that range for many teams. He is expected to pitch in the Cape Cod League and has a chance to raise his stock there.
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  18. 185
    Last: 186

    Brannon Jordan

    South Carolina RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 190 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Rays '19 (31)
    Age At Draft: 23.0
    RapScore: 55

    BA Grade: 40 | Risk: High
    Fastball: 50 | Curveball: 45 | Slider: 55 | Changeup: 40 | Control: 45

    Jordan had some interest as a top-five-round pick in the shortened 2020 draft, but he wound up going undrafted and made it back to South Carolina for his second season with the program after transferring in from Cowley County (Kan.) JC in 2019. Jordan was lights out for the Gamecocks in 2020, posting a 1.71 ERA over four starts, but his control backed up this spring and he managed just a 4.58 ERA over 15 starts and 72.2 innings. He still struck out batters at a decent clip (12.1 K/9), but his walk rate jumped from 3.9 BB/9 to 5.9 BB/9. Jordan has a four-pitch mix but primarily works off of his low-90s fastball and low-80s slider. The fastball has touched 95 mph at its peak and scouts like how it plays in the zone, while his slider flashes plus potential, but he doesn’t consistently hit on the pitch. When he throws a good one, it shows hard tilt in the 83-85 mph range and creates ugly swings from opposing batters from either side of the plate. Jordan also throws a slower curveball with more 12-to-6 shape and a seldomly used mid-80s changeup. The changeup has shown interesting tumbling life at times, but it’s tough for scouts to fully evaluate it with how often he’s thrown the pitch. Jordan was less consistent from start to start this season than scouts expected and there are starter/reliever questions given his strike throwing this year.
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  19. 209
    Last: 210

    Cam Butler

    Big Valley Christian HS, Modesto, Calif. OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 185 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Cal Poly
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    Butler emerged from relative obscurity to become one of the draft’s biggest pop-up prospects this spring. Despite playing poor competition at a tiny high school in a remote locale, Butler’s tools and athleticism were prolific enough to send high-level decision-makers rushing in to see him before the season ended. Butler has a strong, athletic frame at 6 feet, 185 pounds and a well-rounded skill set on both sides of the ball. Though his swing is a touch stiff, he has plenty of bat speed and the strength to project for plus raw power at maturity. He hit home runs this spring that cleared the pine trees beyond the left-field fence at his home field and landed in a nearby parking lot. Butler has some crudeness to his game and will swing and miss, but he keeps improving and optimistic evaluators see the tools to project him becoming an average hitter with above-average power. Butler is an impressive athlete who makes Derek Jeter-esque backhanded plays and jump throws from shortstop. He is a plus runner who is light on his feet and has the plus arm strength to make throws from anywhere on the field. Butler isn’t particularly polished and may move to second base or center field at the higher levels, but he is athletic enough to stand in at shortstop and provide defensive versatility up the middle. Butler has rarely faced good competition and requires a lot of projection, but his strength and athleticism have teams interested. He draws high marks for his work ethic and has the makeup to get the most from his natural ability. He is committed to Cal Poly.
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  20. 241
    Last: 242

    Matt Ager

    Foothill HS, Pleasanton, Calif. RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-5 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: UC Santa Barbara
    Age At Draft: 18.2

    Ager has long had appealing traits with his projectable 6-foot-5 frame, clean delivery and picturesque arm action, and he began drawing considerable attention when his velocity jumped from 87-89 mph to 91-93 this spring. He wasn’t able to maintain that velocity bump throughout the season, but his progress nonetheless piqued teams’ interest. Ager needs time but has a lot of potential. He mostly pitches at 87-90 mph, but his frame and delivery give scouts confidence he’ll sit 94-96 mph once he adds strength and fills out. His fastball plays up with carry through the strike zone and has the potential to be a plus pitch. Ager’s breaking ball has the shape and bite to be an above-average or better pitch once he adds power to it. He shows feel for a nascent changeup and throws plenty of strikes out of a clean, repeatable delivery. Ager is easy to dream on, but his present stuff is lacking and he has years of strength gains ahead. He is committed to UC Santa Barbara.
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  21. 252
    Last: 253

    Landen Roupp

    UNC Wilmington RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.8

    Roupp doesn’t jump out at you in terms of pure stuff, but he’s been nothing but a consistent starter for UNC Wilmington over his four-year career and after posting a 2.58 ERA this spring, has a career ERA of 2.99. He fills up the strike zone with a three-pitch mix that features a fastball in the 89-91 mph range that tops out at 94, a mid-70s curveball with 11-to-5 shape and mostly top-down action and an infrequently used changeup in the low 80s that he always lands down and away to his glove side. Scouts don’t see any pitch that’s plus in Roupp’s repertoire and everything might be more fringe-average than average, but he throws strikes and has always performed. Roupp is listed at 6-foot-2, 205 pounds and has a starter’s look, with a clean arm action that features some plunge in the back but a balanced finish and consistent release point.
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  22. 255
    Last: 256

    Scott Randall

    Sacramento State RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 172 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 23.0
    RapScore: 46

    Long known for his immaculate control at the front of Sacramento State’s rotation, Randall led the nation with an 11.44 strikeout-to-walk ratio this spring and showed a velocity bump to enhance his draft stock. After ranging from 87-91 mph in previous years, Randall began sitting at 90-92 mph and touched 96 this season without sacrificing any of his plus-plus control. He went 7-2, 2.89 with 103 strikeouts and only nine walks in 87.1 innings for the Hornets. Randall’s stuff doesn’t jump out on paper, but everything plays up with his command and deception. His fastball is sneaky and gets on hitters faster than they expect to draw swings and misses in the strike zone. His best secondary is an above-average changeup he uses to keep hitters off-balance and his slider is a fringy but usable offering he can land for strikes. Randall mostly beats hitters with his fastball and goes right after them with it. He trusts his stuff, doesn’t nibble and has the command to exploit holes in batters’ swings. Randall’s performance and improved stuff have teams interested on the draft’s second day or early on the third day. He is a fourth-year junior and projects to sign.
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  23. 291
    Last: 292

    Jesse Bergin

    UCLA RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Bergin prepped at Harvard-Westlake High in Los Angeles, the same school that produced Max Fried, Lucas Giolito and Jack Flaherty, and spent three years in UCLA’s rotation. He entered this spring with big expectations but wasn’t able to meet them in a disappointing season. He went 6-3, 4.24 with 62 strikeouts and 21 walks in 74.1 innings during the regular season and allowed more than a hit per inning. Bergin is big and physical at 6-foot-4, 205 pounds, but his stuff is mostly average. His fastball sits in the low 90s and plays up a bit with his extension. He mostly throws his fastball and will go to his average slider to try and get swings and misses. Bergin’s delivery is stiff and his effortful arm action concerns evaluators. He projects best in the bullpen where his fastball might jump to the mid 90s in short stints.
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  24. 298
    Last: 299

    Chris Moore

    Suffield (Conn.) Academy HS SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 210 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Tennessee
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    Moore's older brother, C.J., was a 13th-round pick of the D-backs in 2014 out of high school but didn't sign. Chris Moore is strong, athletic and has good bat speed, so the ball jumps off his bat in batting practice, with the ability to drive it well especially to the opposite field. Last summer, Moore had trouble with breaking pitches at big events, with a swing that cuts in and out of the hitting zone quickly, so some scouts have concerns about how much contact he's going to make against more advanced pitchers. A solid-average runner, Moore is a fluid mover at shortstop with good hands and footwork along with a strong arm, though with his body type he might outgrow the position and slide over to third base.
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  25. 321
    Last: 322

    Donta Williams

    Arizona OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-10 | Wt: 172 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 22.0

    Williams was one of the top high school players out of Nevada but after going undrafted in 2017 made it to campus at Arizona, where he has become an extremely polished hitter. He takes professional at-bats, with good feel to hit and an advanced understanding of the strike zone. His below-average power turned into some sneaky pop in 2021, when he hit six home runs in 203 at-bats during the regular season, but that’s not his game. He posted a slash line of .335/.487/.517 with 45 walks to 33 strikeouts. Williams is a scout favorite, and with his high floor and solid fourth outfielder profile is viewed as a relatively safe pick. Despite being only an average runner, Williams is a plus defender thanks to good instincts and feel for jumps and reads. His average arm with good carry will also serve him well in the corners. Williams swings at strikes, spraying balls around the field, but he needs to improve his bunting and bat path. Consistently playing at a high speed, Williams raises the level of play of those around him.
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