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Top Undrafted Players From 2020 Draft

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(Photo by Alex Trautwig/MLB photos via Getty Images)

As was expected once the draft was shortened to five rounds, there's plenty of talent that went undrafted following the 2020 MLB Draft.

Now we'll see who makes it to campus and who signs undrafted free agent deals starting Sunday at 9 a.m. ET.

Below is a list of the best undrafted players from the BA 500.

To see the results of the draft, click here

352 Matches
See Full List Expand Collapse All Updated on: 6/12/2020
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    Carson Montgomery (BA RANK: 40 )

    Windermere (Fla.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Florida State
    Age At Draft: 17.8

    A 6-foot-2, 195-pound righthander committed to Florida State, Montgomery has a loud two-pitch mix featuring a fastball that’s already up to 96 mph and one of the better sliders in the prep class. Montgomery consistently showed an impressive ability to generate whiffs with both pitches, with his fastball up in the zone and his slider at the bottom and below the strike zone. His fastball sits more in the 90-93 range after he settles in, but the pitch comes out of a high three-quarters slot with good angle and features solid running life. His slider flashes plus consistently, with hard and late diving action that routinely fools hitters, though scouts mentioned that the pitch is inconsistent. Some cite a wrist wrap in the back of his arm slot that could lead to the inconsistencies of the breaking ball, which also limits his fastball command. Montgomery can lose the zone at times and his command is more scattered than teams would like from a prep arm with first-round stuff. Additionally, teams will have to project on Montgomery’s changeup, which is firm in the upper 80s with little movement, but could become a reliable third pitch with additional usage. A team that likes his chance to start long-term could take him in the back half of the first, though most of the industry might have him slightly after that range. He could be a tough sign, particularly within a shortened 2020 draft.
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    Kevin Parada (BA RANK: 48 )

    Loyola HS, Los Angeles C
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Georgia Tech
    Age At Draft: 18.9

    Parada won MVP of the 2018 WWBA World Championships as a junior and continued to perform at every major showcase last summer. He got off to a red-hot start this spring and had Southern California area scouts buzzing before the season shut down. Parada is widely considered one of the best prep hitters in the class. He’s a strong, powerful hitter who crushes both fastballs and offspeed pitches, and he has a long track record of performing against good competition. Parada stays in the strike zone, covers the whole plate and already posts exit velocities near 100 mph. Evaluators see a potential .280 or better hitter with a chance to hit 20 or more home runs. Parada is less certain to remain a catcher. He’s a good athlete, but he’s a fringe-average defender whose flexibility is a concern. His above-average arm strength is nullified at times by a long arm action. Some clubs want to make Parada an outfielder and let him focus on hitting. He is strongly committed to Georgia Tech and may be difficult to sign.
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    Chase Davis (BA RANK: 55 )

    Franklin HS, Elk Grove, Calif. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 210 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Arizona
    Age At Draft: 18.5

    A toolsy, physical outfielder out of Northern California, Davis has a strong 6-foot-1, 210-pound frame, impressive bat speed, raw power and a big arm. Davis is the type of athlete who jumps off the field quickly in a showcase environment thanks to his tool set. He recorded a 99 mph throw from the outfield at Perfect Game’s National showcase at the start of the summer, and scouting departments voted Davis as the second-best outfield arm in the 2020 class. Additionally, he can show impressive raw power in batting practice. The Arizona commit has also shown the ability to get to his tools during games. He was particularly impressive last fall in Jupiter, where he hit a home run, two triples and a double in six games, showing solid contact and the ability to drive the ball in a game setting. Davis’ swing can get a bit long, which can hurt him, as does his ability to pick up and recognize offspeed offerings. When he stays within himself and times up pitchers, however, he does a lot of damage. Some scouts have given him 70-grade bat speed and love how long he keeps the barrel in the zone. Mechanically, he can get himself into poor positions with a deep, tight bat wrap, but when he launches for contact his bat path is direct with natural loft that helps him get to his above-average power. Defensively, Davis needs continued refinement, but he’s a solid enough runner to develop into at least an average defender in a corner with more than enough arm to fit in right field. Davis has an impressive work ethic and loves to get in the gym, as his physique suggests.
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    Victor Mederos (BA RANK: 59 )

    Westminster Christian Academy, Miami RHP
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    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 215 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Miami
    Age At Draft: 19.0

    A two-time Under Armour All-American, Mederos has been seen early and often by the national scouting community and brings a physical, workhorse’s frame to the table at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. Mederos was running his fastball up into the mid-90s and showing a hammer of a curveball before his junior season and showed similar stuff last summer. Over the offseason, Mederos worked on improving his body. Scouts say he came out early this spring looking much better in that regard, but his results were inconsistent. When Mederos is at his best, he looks like one of the better pitchers in the 2020 class. He runs his fastball up to 95-96 mph consistently and backs it up with a two-seam fastball, curveball, slider and changeup. In previous years Mederos focused on throwing all of his off-speed offerings in any count, and has developed a good feel for landing those pitches consistently, but his fastball command has been more erratic. He has shown a tendency to overthrow at times, and repeating a consistent release point with the pitch has been a challenge, leading some scouts to question his athleticism. Others believe he has solid athleticism for a big-bodied pitcher but also acknowledge that he needs to be more consistent in his delivery. While he has typically shown a 60-grade fastball, the pitch appeared closer to fringe-average in his final starts before the season ended. His curveball is his best secondary pitch, with a spin rate in the 2,600-rpm range as well as excellent power and finish. Some scouts have graded the pitch as high as a 70 on the traditional 20-80 scouting scale. However, Mederos needs to improve the consistency of that offering, like the rest of his operation. Each of his other offerings have a chance to be at least average, giving him plenty of weapons to mix and match from at-bat to at-bat. Mederos has a big league-caliber frame and repertoire, but teams will need to be confident in his ability to refine his entire game to sign him out of a Miami commitment. His natural talent fits as high as the first round, but inconsistencies and questions about strike-throwing could push him into the second or third.
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    Alejandro Rosario (BA RANK: 60 )

    Miami Christian HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 165 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Miami
    Age At Draft: 18.4

    Voted by scouts as a preseason second-team All-American, Rosario has an electric right arm, which he uses to fire a fastball that gets up to the 97-98 mph range. Standing at just 6-foot-1, 165 pounds, Rosario is undersized and smaller than most of the prep pitchers in the same talent range in the 2020 class. Despite his size, he has a fairly clean delivery without a ton of effort. In addition to Rosario’s fastball, he has a split-change and a slider which have both shown above-average potential. Rosario was one of the most reliable arms with Team USA’s 18U National Team last summer, throwing 13 innings with a 1.38 ERA, nine strikeouts and two walks. Despite his pure stuff, scouts have some concerns about how everything plays. This spring, scouts noted that he wasn’t missing many bats, which is alarming considering his velocity was still up to 97. There’s not a lot of deception in Rosario’s operation, and scouts wonder how his fastball will play at the next level. They would also like to see more tilt and depth out of his slider, which dives more vertically than horizontally and can often blend into his split change. Both offspeed offerings are in the same 79-84 mph velocity range. Scouts love Rosario’s arm strength and laud his competitive makeup, but with questions about the playability of his stuff and size, teams might be prevented from taking him in a range where he would sign away from his Miami commitment. With a refined breaking ball and more whiffs against his fastball at the next level, Rosario could work himself into a no-doubt first-round talent. For now, he’s just outside that range.
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    Drew Bowser (BA RANK: 63 )

    Harvard-Westlake HS, Studio City, Calif. SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Stanford
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    Bowser had a weekend to remember at the Perfect Game All-American Classic last summer. He raised the most money of any player at the event for Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, won the pregame home run derby and then earned MVP of the game with a double and a walk. Bowser is a smart, mature hitter with big raw power that some evaluators consider plus-plus. He already posts exit velocities near 100 mph and hunts for mistake pitches he can drive. Bowser is an adept offspeed hitter, but his fringy bat speed and long swing leave him vulnerable to velocity and raise concerns about his future hitting ability. He often has to cheat to get to upper-end fastballs and is prone to swinging and missing against them. A shortstop now, Bowser projects to outgrow the position but has a chance to be an above-average defender with a plus arm at third base. Bowser has a strong commitment to Stanford and will be difficult to sign.
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    Cade Horton (BA RANK: 65 )

    Norman (Okla.) HS SS/RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 190 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Oklahoma
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    Horton has a variety of different paths forward in his athletic future, and not all of them involve baseball. Committed to Oklahoma to play both football and baseball, Horton is a talented high school quarterback and a legitimate two-way player on the diamond. Horton was a third-team preseason All-American as a pitcher, but there are teams who prefer him as a position player. He’s an athletic shortstop with a natural feel for the game and an impressive internal clock. He’s a twitchy athlete who isn’t necessarily a pure shortstop, but he has the athleticism and arm strength to make it work with continued reps and focus, while third base is a possibility as well. At the plate, Horton has a heavy opposite-field approach with a short bat path that limits his extension at times. On the mound, Horton’s arm works well and he can reach back and get to 94-95 mph, though his velocity tends to fall off fairly quickly. He’ll dip into the low 90s and down into the upper 80s more than scouts would like. He has a natural feel to spin a breaking ball and knows how to use it, with the pitch projecting as average. Almost everyone agrees that Horton could become significantly better in either area if he focused exclusively on pitching or hitting, but teams aren’t sure which he prefers or even if he’s ready to give up football. Because of that there’s a good chance he makes it to campus, but he has plenty of upside as a projection arm and a talented hitter and defender.
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    Enrique Bradfield (BA RANK: 66 )

    American Heritage HS, Plantation, Fla. OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 155 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Vanderbilt
    Age At Draft: 18.5

    The best runner in the prep class, Bradfield has posted sub-6.3 60-yard dash times, which are 80-grade times, and incorporates that speed in all phases of the game. A no-doubt center fielder, Bradfield uses his blazing speed to cover huge swaths of outfield grass, getting to balls in the gap that other fielders wouldn’t dream of catching. He’s more than just a fast runner though, as Bradfield consistently shows advanced route-running ability and has an elite first-step when reading balls off the bat. All of those traits combine to give him elite defensive potential at a premium position, and he also has solid arm strength. There are more questions about the offensive side of his game. Bradfield sets up with a wide stance and has impressive bat-to-ball skills, but he has well below-average raw power and there’s little in his frame to suggest he will ever grow into average power in the future. Instead, he should be a slappy, line-drive hitter who succeeds by putting balls into the outfield gaps, bunting and using his speed to collect extra-base hits and put pressure on the defense. His dynamic speed should be an asset on the bases as well, even at a time when stealing has become less of an emphasis in the major leagues. Bradfield could be a tough sign out of a Vanderbilt commitment, but he has the athleticism and game-breaking running ability that every team covets.
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    Ty Floyd (BA RANK: 69 )

    Rockmart (Ga.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Louisiana State
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    An athletic, projectable righthander out of Georgia, Floyd was a two-way player for most of his life and thought of himself as more of a hitter than pitcher until recently. Also a talented basketball player, Floyd doesn’t have a ton of innings under his belt. Because of all those factors, there are more question marks with Floyd but also reasons to think he could take big steps forward by focusing exclusively on baseball. Committed to Louisiana State, Floyd has an explosive fastball out of a quick arm, running the pitch up into the mid-90s with an impressive riding life that gets plenty of whiffs up in the zone. At East Coast Pro last summer, Floyd got 12 whiffs on the pitch in just two innings. He typically sits in the 90-93 mph range, but scouts have noted that his velocity is inconsistent from outing to outing. Similarly, his secondary offerings are inconsistent and don’t project as anything more than fringe-average, 45-grade offerings now. He has thrown a slurvy curveball in the 70-75 mph range that he doesn’t get on top of consistently but has decent spin, and has also thrown an upper-70s changeup, though his release point drops when he throws it. With a lean, 6-foot-2, 180-pound frame, it’s easy to dream of what Floyd could be with a few years of development and training under his belt but teams that want more of a finished product might be more inclined to let him get to campus.
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    Seth Lonsway (BA RANK: 74 )

    Ohio State LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Reds '17 (19)
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    Scouts weren’t sure what to do with Lonsway after a disappointing summer in the Cape Cod League, where he showed inconsistent fastball velocity and extremely spotty control. In 12 innings with Brewster, Lonsway walked 12 batters and struck out 12. He moved significantly up draft boards this spring by showing markedly improved stuff, both in terms of his fastball and his secondary offerings. Lonsway now has a fastball that gets up into the mid-90s from the left side, along with a curveball that has impressive tilt, a slider and changeup. While the pure stuff has been good, Lonsway still has significant control issues to resolve. While he struck out a ridiculous 42 batters in 18 innings (21 strikeouts per nine innings) he also walked 18 batters—a batter an inning. Some scouts have said that it’s only his fastball he struggles to locate. They’ve seen him spot all of his secondary offerings better than the heater, but without improved fastball control it is difficult to envision much success in pro ball. Lonsway has struggled to repeat the timing of his delivery and keep everything in sync, but if a team believes they can help him figure that out, he has some exciting upside with a pair of plus offerings and a 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame. Still, he comes with extreme reliever risk.
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    Tommy Mace (BA RANK: 75 )

    Florida RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-7 | Wt: 225 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Reds '17 (12)
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    A super projectable arm out of high school, Mace took steps forward with his velocity as a high school senior, when he ran his fastball up 94 after mostly pitching in the upper 80s on the showcase circuit. He made it to campus at Florida and made an immediate impact as a freshman in the bullpen before transitioning to a starting role in 2019, when he took over the Friday night role in just the fourth week of the season. He performed well through four starts in the shortened 2020 season, posting a 1.67 ERA in 27 innings with 26 strikeouts and five walks. A 6-foot-7, 225-pound righthander who still has plenty of projection in his frame, Mace throws a fastball that gets up into the 95-96 mph range. Scouts think his fastball gets too flat and prefer the sinking, two-seam fastball that he throws more than his four-seamer. Mace shows good feel for a hard slider/cutter and a changeup, though scouts think the breaking ball is more fringy, while his changeup has a chance to be an average offering. Mace as also worked on a slower curveball. Because of the quality of his slider and his lack of big strikeout numbers at Florida, evaluators believe he’ll always be a pitcher who relies on ground balls and generating weak contact. Without a plus pitch, Mace doesn’t have a ton of upside, but he still has physical projection remaining and has always been a quality strike-thrower—2.8 walks per nine innings in his Florida career. Mace fits as a late day one or early day two pick.
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    Yohandy Morales (BA RANK: 77 )

    Braddock HS, Miami SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Miami
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    Morales is a big, physical, toolsy shortstop with big league bloodlines. His father, Andy, played in the majors and Morales likely has the same pure talent to follow in his footsteps. Morales matured physically quicker than most of his contemporaries and showed an impact righthanded bat as an underclassman. Now listed at 6-foot-4, 195 pounds, Morales still has room to fill out and add strength, but he’ll need more refinement in his game to make the most of his impressive tool set. Last summer, Morales showed an ambush approach with a strong tendency to pull the ball and he also struggled significantly with offspeed offerings, swinging and missing out of the zone at a moderate rate. Having his spring season shortened hurt Morales, as scouts were impressed with the growth he showed in his first few games. In those looks, scouts saw a better approach at the plate with a more direct swing, with fewer whiffs and much better contact ability. While the pitching competition wasn’t as consistently strong as he would see on the showcase circuit, South Florida is generally one of the better areas for high school baseball and this season is no different. Morales has plus raw power, but there are questions of how frequently he’ll be able to tap into that. Defensively, he has plus arm strength, though he lacks the foot speed and short-area quickness that teams want to see in a shortstop. He has long actions and a slow exchange at times, which will probably make him a better fit for third base. Morales could be a second- or third-round pick based on his talent upside, but if teams are concerned with the risk he comes with, he could make it to campus at Miami.
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    Ricky Tiedemann (BA RANK: 80 )

    Lakewood (Calif.) HS LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: San Diego State
    Age At Draft: 17.8

    Few players raised their stock in limited time more this spring than Tiedemann, whose brother Tai is a pitcher in the Rangers organization. An interesting but hardly elite prospect entering the year, Tiedemann came out showing increased velocity and feel for his secondaries and put himself among the top players in a loaded Southern California draft class. Tiedemann is an elite athlete with a physical 6-foot-3 frame, big hands and a tantalizing left arm. His fastball sits around 88-91 mph and touches 93, and his projectable body and athleticism make it easy to envision him reaching the mid-90s once he fills out. He complements his fastball with a potentially plus changeup, and his average hard slider gives him a quality third offering. Tiedemann is one of the youngest players in the class and will still be 17 on draft day. His only drawback is he broke his right, non-throwing wrist on a collision at first base late in the season. Tiedemann is committed to San Diego State, but clubs are keen to buy him out of that commitment with his athleticism, youth and projection.
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    Gavin Williams (BA RANK: 81 )

    East Carolina RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 240 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Rays '17 (30)
    Age At Draft: 20.9

    Williams had some of the easiest velocity in the high school class back in 2017, when he was touching the mid-90s with a projectable frame. At the time, scouts expected he would throw 100 mph one day. They were right, as Williams has been up into the 100-101 mph range at his best when healthy with East Carolina. There’s a bit of injury history on Williams’ resume. He missed time during his freshman season and only threw three innings this spring after a finger injury delayed his start to the season. While most of his time at ECU has been out of the bullpen, scouts think he might have a chance to start at the next level thanks to a large, 6-foot-6, 240-pound frame, some of the easiest upper-90s fastball velocity you’ll see, natural feel to spin a breaking ball and flashes of an above-average changeup. He’ll need to develop his secondaries a bit more, as he has shown a tendency to baby his curveball instead of ripping it off with intent, but the natural ability to spin it is there. Scouts have also seen his control and command waver when out of the stretch with runners on base, so he’ll need to take steps forward improving those little aspects of the game as well. With a potential 80-grade fastball and two secondaries with above-average potential, the stuff is all there. With a solid junior season, teams thought he could go as high as the supplemental first round. Now, after just 68 career innings, Williams could be a late day one or early day two pick.
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    Tanner Witt (BA RANK: 92 )

    Episcopal HS, Bellaire, Texas 3B/RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Texas
    Age At Draft: 17.9

    A massive, 6-foot-6, 195-pound two-way player out of Texas, Witt has legitimate pro potential as both a hitter and a pitcher. Offensively, Witt has big power from the right side to go along with decent barrel control, but his bat speed is a tick slow and the path of his barrel can get lengthy. Evaluators believe he’s more power than pure hit tool. He is a third baseman now with plenty of arm strength for the position, but he could already be too big to stick there and might be better served in an outfield corner or at first base. Most teams seem to like his upside on the mound more than his hitting potential, though his father, Kevin, played in the big leagues and is currently a minor league hitting coach. On the mound, Witt is a projection arm with an excellent frame that can still add strength, a clean arm action and solid control. He throws a fastball in the 89-92 mph range mostly, touching a 93 or 94 here and there. His best pitch is a curveball that’s presently an above-average offering and has plus potential. It’s a 73-78 mph breaker with three-quarters shape and massive spin and depth. At the Area Code Games last summer it was in the 2,600-2,900 rpm range. In addition to a fastball/curveball combination, Witt has thrown a changeup in the mid-80s that could become an average pitch as well. Witt is committed to Texas.
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    Trenton Denholm (BA RANK: 97 )

    UC Irvine RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Red Sox '17 (26)
    Age At Draft: 20.5

    An unsigned 26th-round pick of the Red Sox out of high school, Denholm won Big West Conference pitcher of the year as a sophomore and did not allow an earned run in two years pitching in the Cape Cod League, totaling 32.2 innings including the All-Star Game and postseason. An undersized 5-foot-11, 180-pound righthander, Denholm is more steady than eye-popping. He locates his 89-93 mph fastball, gets off-balance swings with a plus changeup, mixes in an average slider and flips in the occasional curveball for strikes to keep batters guessing. He’s an elite competitor who fills up the strike zone with four pitches and never gives in, often outperforming pitchers who have better stuff. Denholm’s stuff ticked down this spring due to elbow inflammation, but he still found ways to compete. Like other accomplished collegiate strike-throwers, Denholm is in the mix to be drafted between the third and fifth rounds.
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    Casey Opitz (BA RANK: 100 )

    Arkansas C
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 200 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Indians '17 (27)
    Age At Draft: 21.9

    Casey Opitz has the best, most accurate arm among catchers in this year’s class and one of the best scouts have seen in years. His release is quick, but even more than the plus-plus pop times, what impresses evaluators is his ability to consistently put the ball right where infielders want, almost making their tag for them. He threw out 54 percent of basestealers as a freshman, 48 percent as a sophomore and 40 percent (4 of 10) as a junior. He has consistently handled quality arms and works well with pitchers. Defensively, he has all the tools to be a solid big leaguer, but his bat will likely keep him from being more than a solid backup. After weighing only 175 pounds earlier in his college career, Opitz bulked up to 200 pounds this year. It has helped his strength and durability, but Opitz still faces plenty of offensive questions. Opitz did show significant improvement in his 16 games this season with a more aggressive approach before the season shut down. His .302/.361/.509 stat line in 2020 was a vast improvement after he failed to hit better than .240 and never topped a .311 slugging percentage in his first two years at Arkansas. But Opitz still doesn’t show average raw power in batting practice and scouts see him as a likely backup eventually because of his light bat. A full season may have given Opitz a chance to show his offensive improvements were more than just a hot start, but for now his glove should be enough to entice a pro team to take him in the third or fourth round.
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    Patrick Reilly (BA RANK: 103 )

    Christian Brothers Academy, Lincroft, N.J. RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Vanderbilt
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    Reilly popped up in the fall after a strong showing in Jupiter. He took the mound for six innings, something that’s uncommon at the event, and showed increased velocity on his fastball. His fastball went from sitting at 85-90 mph in July to 90-95 in the fall, topping out at 96, albeit in a small sample size. The increase in velocity was a result of massive gains to his body. At 6-foot-4, 200 pounds, Reilly has the feel of a power righthander and has the potential for a plus fastball if he can keep up the consistency he showed in the fall. In addition to his fastball, he throws a power curveball that has a chance to profile as a 60-grade pitch, and a changeup that is presently behind the other two pitches but could become average. Reilly has better raw stuff than Alex Santos and Jason Savacool, but the key for him is maintaining consistency in the future. A repeatable delivery and an ability to throw strikes could help Reilly continue to profile as a starter. He’s committed to Vanderbilt.
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    Colby Halter (BA RANK: 106 )

    Bishop Kenny HS, Jacksonville SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 195 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Florida
    Age At Draft: 18.8

    A 6-foot-1, 195-pound Florida commit who performed with USA Baseball’s 18U National Team and generally does well with the bat wherever he’s playing, Halter doesn’t overflow with tools but impresses scouts with his hitting ability and versatility. A utility player with Team USA who can handle any infield position in a pinch, Halter is a shortstop for his high school team but scouts think he’ll have to move off the position at the next level. He has an above-average, accurate arm that could play anywhere on the infield, but doesn’t have the elite actions or footspeed teams like to see out of a shortstop. Additionally, Halter doesn’t currently have the power that makes him an obvious candidate to profile super well at third base or another corner position, but scouts keep coming back to his natural hitting ability. Halter hit .419/.486/.548 with Team USA, good for third on the team in hitting, and he got plenty of national heat early this spring before the 2020 season was shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Teams who believe in Halter’s lefty bat will draft him in the second or third round and figure out the position later—similar to Reds second baseman Tyler Callihan from the 2019 class—while others would be more inclined to let him reach campus at Florida and prove it.
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    Mason Miller (BA RANK: 108 )

    Mitchell HS, New Port Richey, Fla. LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Florida Gulf Coast
    Age At Draft: 18.2

    An up-arrow prep arm before the 2020 season was shut down, Miller is a 6-foot-3, 200-pound southpaw committed to Florida Gulf Coast who has some of the best natural ability to spin a breaking ball in the entire 2020 class. Over the summer at East Coast Pro, Miller showed a 74-78 mph breaking ball with elite spin rate in the 2,800-3,000 rpm range with tremendous shape and depth. The pitch humped out of his hand early and lacked power and consistent finish at times, but showed hints of a true plus offering. He also showed a fastball in the 86-91 mph range that generated 10 whiffs over three innings at ECP, and this spring his velocity was more 88-92 and touching 93. His fastball has slight running action thanks to a lower, three-quarters slot which can also make his curveball more slurvy. Miller’s control is just average now, but scouts are excited about how well his arm works, the clean action and an athletic body that bodes well for his future development. If Miller is signable, it would be difficult to see him going outside of the third or fourth round, as there aren’t many prep lefties with his body, arm action and breaking ball potential.
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    Nate Wohlgemuth (BA RANK: 109 )

    Owasso (Okla.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Arkansas
    Age At Draft: 19.0

    Wohlgemuth has been a high-profile prep arm for several years. The Arkansas signee put an exclamation mark on his showcase season by no-hitting the Langley Blaze at Jupiter. Wohlgemuth’s average fastball can touch 96 mph and he’ll mix a four-seamer and a two-seamer that he likes to work in on lefties, leaking it back over the plate. His four-seamer can be too straight and he doesn’t create plane or angle. Unlike most prep fireballers, Wohlgemuth already has solid feel for an above-average changeup. He maintains his arm speed and the pitch drops off at the plate. His average curveball is less consistent. Throwing from a three-quarters arm slot, Wohlgemuth manages to get some depth on it at times, but it also can get slurvy. With three average or better pitches, Wohlgemuth is pretty advanced, but he also doesn’t have much room to grow and his control is below-average. He’s 5-foot-11 and has already filled out, with a muscular lower half. The shortened season makes it hard for teams to fully evaluate him and he carries plenty of reliever risk.
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    TJ Nichols (BA RANK: 111 )

    Oakmont HS, Roseville, Calif. RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 170 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Arizona
    Age At Draft: 18.0

    A converted shortstop, Nichols impressed scouts last summer at the 2019 Area Code Games by showing one of the bigger fastballs of the event. He threw twice during the week and touched 96 on both occasions, sitting in the 92-95 mph range in his shorter outings. He got hit around more than you would expect with that sort of velocity and his strikes were scattered. Nichols showed an inconsistent slider in the 78-81 mph range but flashed solid bite. Nichols has plenty of refining to do, but he has impressive arm strength and a lanky, 6-foot-3, 170-pound frame that can add significantly more weight. Many scouts believe he’ll add 20-30 pounds with a chance to throw 100 mph. He has present reliever risk because of his delivery and strike-throwing concerns, but he's an athletic pitcher and could make strides in the command department as he develops. An Arizona commit, Nichols is talented enough to potentially fit into a two-way role if he makes it to campus, though his pro future is certainly on the mound.
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    Cole Foster (BA RANK: 112 )

    Plano (Texas) Senior HS SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 185 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Auburn
    Age At Draft: 18.7

    Foster is an area scout favorite because he has a refined swing from both sides of the plate and the game never speeds up on him.The Auburn signee is a fringe-average runner, but he maye be able to stay at shortstop because he has an excellent internal clock, solid actions and a strong, accurate plus arm. Foster’s bat is his best asset. He consistently catches up to good velocity and rarely gets fooled. He’s a plus hitter with fringe-average power. It may be tough to convince Foster to forgo his college commitment as a third-to-fourth round pick, but if he does get to school, it won’t be a surprise if he plays his way into being an even higher pick in a few years.
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    Jason Savacool (BA RANK: 115 )

    Baldwinsville (N.Y.) HS RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Maryland
    Age At Draft: 18.1

    Savacool is the second-best prep pitcher in the northeast region behind righthander Alex Santos. Unlike Santos, who already has three above-average pitches, Savacool’s stuff is less loud but it is solid. Savacool pitches from a low three-quarters arm slot with some length in the back of his arm action. His release point is somewhat inconsistent and needs some ironing out, but he has good deception and extension in his delivery thanks in part to a large wingspan that’s bigger than his 6-foot-1 frame would suggest. As far as his pitch arsenal goes, he leads the way with a sinking fastball that sits around 88-93 mph. His sinker is matched with a slider in the 79-81 mph range that is a future above-average offering. Savacool also throws a curveball and a changeup, but both pitches are behind his first two options. At 6-foot-1, 200 pounds, there is less projection to Savacool’s body. Savacool is committed to Maryland, where he could carve out a prominent role and further increase his draft stock in three years if a team doesn’t sign him on his future potential now.
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    Luke Waddell (BA RANK: 116 )

    Georgia Tech SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-9 | Wt: 176 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Diamondbacks '19 (32)
    Age At Draft: 21.9

    Waddell does a lot of things on the field well, bringing defensive versatility, above-average running ability and on-base skills to the table. A third baseman last summer for USA Baseball’s Collegiate National Team, Waddell was third on the team in hitting, with a .300/.419/.417 line over 16 games. Coaches were impressed with his defensive ability. Waddell reads the ball well off the bat, has reliable hands and good body control. While he plays shortstop for Georgia Tech, he probably doesn’t have the defensive ability at the position to push off better defenders and is more likely a super-utility type player who can fill in at shortstop in a pinch if necessary. Waddell was also Team USA’s emergency catcher. Offensively, Waddell has solid bat-to-ball skills and impressive zone recognition, but he lacks much power. Instead he takes professional at-bats and swings at the right pitches, doing his damage by collecting walks and slapping singles around the field. In his Georgia Tech career, Waddell has walked 13 percent of the time compared to striking out just nine percent. With a maxed out, 5-foot-9, 180-pound frame, Waddell doesn’t offer a ton of projection or impact potential, but scouts and coaches alike praise his work ethic, determination and baseball IQ.
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