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Built To Last

Marc Topkin -

The flashy rings, the William Harridge trophy and the American League championship banner they will raise on April 13 are all tangible residuals of the Rays' stunning 2008 success. But there was so much more to their remarkable season, which included their first winning record, maiden playoff appearance, a trip to the World Series, a haul of major postseason awards and—to cap it all—Baseball America's Organization of the Year award.

Majors | #2008#Awards#Organization Of The Year

What A Legacy

Bill Ballew -

The year 1948 had its fair share of signings.<br/><br/>President Harry Truman signed the Marshall Plan and later instituted the second peacetime military draft in United States history. Israel signed its declaration of independence. And perhaps slightly overlooked was the White Sox's signing of 17-year-old righthander Bill Fischer one day after he impressed Hall of Famer Red Ruffing during a tryout camp in Wisconsin Rapids.

Majors | #2008#Awards#Roland Hemond Award

Setting Up Success

Alex Speier -

In six years under general manager Theo Epstein, the Red Sox have enjoyed more on-field success than any team in baseball. Boston has been to the playoffs five times, winning two championships and coming just one win short of reaching two additional World Series. During that time, the primary goal of the Red Sox has been, in Epstein's words, "to build a healthy foundation that could put us in position to have sustained success." By all indications, the Sox have done precisely that.

Majors | #2008#Awards#Executive Of The Year

Turning Over A New Lee-f

Stephanie Storm -Premium Content

Cliff Lee had his mind set. He was not going back to the minor leagues. "I absolutely have no desire to pitch in Buffalo ever again,'' the Cleveland Indians lefthander defiantly said in spring training as the 2008 season got under way, promptly drawing the line in the sand. He was a new Lee, and this was a new season.

Majors | #2008#Awards#Player Of The Year