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Analyzing The Top 2022 College Baseball Recruiting Classes

Jaden Noot (Nick Koza.)
Jaden Noot (Photo by Nick Koza)

Below is a breakdown of the top recruits and names to know in each of the best recruiting classes in the country. To see our 2022 top recruiting classes, click here.

The recruiting rankings take into account all players from the high school and junior college ranks and were compiled following many conversations with coaches and scouts. Four-year transfers were not considered for the ranking. Player rankings refer to the 2022 draft prospects ranking, which includes all players who are draft eligible.


1. Louisiana State

Recruiting coordinator: Josh Jordan
Top recruit: Jaden Noot, RHP (No. 71)

Overview: After Jay Johnson and his staff were hired last summer, they went to work and supplemented what was already a strong recruiting class with more high-end talent. The result is that even after losing five commits on the first day of the draft, LSU still brings in more players ranked as top-500 draft prospects than any other school. This is the Tigers’ third No. 1 class in the 23-year history of the rankings and their first since 2018.

Hitters: Catcher Brady Neal (83) graduated high school a year early and was one of the youngest players in the draft class. He has a compact lefthanded swing and good bat-to-ball skills, though he doesn’t project for big power. He’s a good athlete, receives well and has solid arm strength, all tools that play well behind the plate. Gavin Guidry has two-way ability as a shortstop and righthander. His defensive ability, well above-average speed and promising righthanded bat all stand out for him as a shortstop. On the mound, he throws his fastball in the low 90s and pairs it with a promising slider. His future is likely as a position player, but he did attract attention as a pitcher as well. Outfielder Paxton Kling was rated as a top-five round pick before he formally opted out of the draft. He stands out for his feel for hitting and polish offensively. He’s an above-average runner and can hit for power as well. He could step right into the lineup at LSU and could be the center fielder of the future. Listed at 6-foot-4, 230 pounds, catcher Jared Jones (215) is big and physical and has huge power potential. Though he’s a righthanded hitter, his size invites comparisons to Joe Mauer and while catchers of that size are rare in the big leagues, he’ll get the chance to handle the position at LSU. He has premium arm strength but still needs to refine his receiving. Catcher Ethan Frey (499) gives the class even more depth behind the plate, though he also has the athleticism to play the outfield or first base. His combination of raw power and arm strength is his calling card. Outfielders Mic Paul and Zeb Ruddell have promising lefthanded swings.

Pitchers: Noot is big and physical, at 6-foot-4, 235 pounds, and he has a loose, easy delivery. His fastball gets into the mid 90s, touching 97 mph, and plays up thanks to its hard, running life. He mixes in a slider and a changeup, but neither is as advanced as his fastball. He throws a lot of strikes and has upside as a starter. Righthander Chase Shores (90) has a huge frame at 6-foot-8, 250 pounds and a powerful arm, running his fastball up to 97 mph. He throws from a lower three-quarters slot and gets good riding life on his fastball, which he combines with a sharp, biting breaking ball and a promising changeup. It’s easy to dream on Shores thanks to his size, stuff and athleticism. Righthander Adrian Siravo, a junior college transfer, last year was an all-star in the Cape Cod League. He has a quality three-pitch mix with a fastball that sits in the low 90s, a sharp slider and a solid changeup. He has a long track record of success and should be able to make a quick impact in Baton Rouge. Righthander Aiden Moffett (495) has a big build and a powerful fastball that has made a jump in the last year, reaching 97 mph. There’s some effort in his delivery, but with a big arm, a hard curveball and a changeup, his upside is significant. Righthander Micah Bucknam, a Canadian native, last summer was drafted in the 16th round by the Blue Jays but opted to do his Grade 13 year. He offers a lot of upside and a promising three-pitch arsenal. Lefthander Nic Bonzini has a strong, physical frame and attacks hitters with a fastball-curveball combination. Lefthander Griffin Herring stands out for his pitchability and throws a lot of strikes with his three-pitch arsenal. The class also includes two more high-end junior college transfers on the mound in lefthander Nate Ackenhausen and righthander Kaleb Applebey. Ackenhausen has a lively fastball that gets swings and misses. Applebey is big and athletic at 6-foot-7, 220 pounds and had Division I offers to play football out of high school. Instead, he offers huge upside on the mound thanks to his mid-90s fastball and power slider.

2. Mississippi

Recruiting coordinator: Carl Lafferty
Top recruit: JT Quinn, RHP (No. 116)

Overview: Coming off a national championship, Ole Miss compiled an impressive all-around recruiting class that brings in some high-upside players and a lot of depth. After losing several players from this year’s title-winning team, the Rebels will be looking to the newcomers to fit in quickly.

Hitters: Shortstop James Smith (283) has elite speed and a lot of physical projection in his 6-foot-4, 177-pound frame. There’s some rawness and swing and miss in his game, but between his speed, athleticism and projectability, there’s plenty to dream on. He also has a strong arm and could be a two-way player for the Rebels. Infielder Ethan Lege (376), a junior college transfer, was drafted in the 16th round by the Brewers, but opted not to sign. He’s got a strong track record of hitting and offers some power, speed and defensive versatility. Third baseman Judd Utermark (492) this spring hit 18 home runs as a North Carolina prep, placing him among the national leaders. The righthanded hitter has plenty of power but was under the radar before his big spring, leaving some unanswered questions about how well he’ll fare against high-level pitching in the SEC. First baseman William Furniss, the son of college baseball legend Eddy Furniss, has an advanced approach at the plate and good feel for the barrel. As he physically matures, he should be able to tap into some lefthanded power. Outfielder Nathan Fink has a powerful righthanded swing and doesn’t get cheated at the plate. He has room to fill out his 6-foot-4 frame, portending even more power potential in time. Listed at 6-foot-5, 230 pounds, infielder Mason Morris has big righthanded power and a strong arm. He moves well for his size and should be able to settle in at third base, where he profiles well. He has some two-way ability and can touch 93 mph on the mound, but his future is likely as a hitter. Infielders Bo Gatlin and Braden Luke, both junior college transfers, give the class two more talented hitters. Gatlin, whose father Guy played at Ole Miss, brings an exciting combination of power and speed and can play anywhere on the infield. Luke is a powerful lefthanded hitter with good bat-to-ball skills who profiles as a corner infielder.

Pitchers: Quinn came on strong in the spring and has an ultra-projectable look at 6-foot-6, 200 pounds. His fastball gets up to 94 mph but typically sits a tick lower—though with plenty of room for more velocity as he physically matures. His curveball is a high-spin, 12-to-6 offering, and it projects to be a second plus pitch in time. His control and changeup both need some work, but he has Friday night upside. Righthander Grayson Saunier (181) was drafted in the 18th round by the Rangers but upheld his commitment to the Rebels. Like Quinn, he this spring took a step forward as his velocity improved and he touched the mid 90s. Listed at 6-foot-4, 200 pounds, he has an athletic build, a good feel for spin and control. He has further upside, but he also is polished enough to quickly take on important innings. Righthander Jordan Vera has a physical build at 6-foot-1, 200 pounds and has premium stuff. His fastball sits in the low 90s and touches 95 mph. His changeup and curveball are both solid offerings and he throws a lot of strikes. Righthander Cole Tolbert this spring helped lead Pearl River (Miss.) JC to the national championship and was named pitcher of the tournament. He has a strong build at 6-foot-4, 210 pounds and a lively, low-90s fastball. He pairs it with a promising breaking ball and is a good athlete. Righthander Tommy Henninger, also a junior college transfer, attacks hitters with a fastball-slider combination. He throws from a three-quarters angle and his fastball works in the low 90s. Righthander Brady Disbro has a strong, physical frame at a listed 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. He has good pitchability to go with a fastball that gets into the low 90s and a sharp slider. Righthanders Patrick Galle and Sam Tookoian offer exciting upside.

3. Louisville

Recruiting coordinator: Eric Snider
Top recruit: Gavin Kilen, SS (No. 149)

Overview: Even after losing a few recruits in the draft, including first-rounder Cam Collier, the Cardinals still pulled in a big, strong class that is the highest ranked in program history.

Hitters: Kilen is the latest prep star from Wisconsin and he upheld his Louisville commitment despite being drafted in the 13th round by the Red Sox. He has an easy lefthanded swing, good bat-to-ball skills and above-average speed that plays well, but he’ll need to get stronger to reach his offensive upside. He’s an excellent defender whose hands, range and arm all play at shortstop. Outfielder Korbyn Dickerson (188) was a 20th-round pick of the Twins, but the Louisville native chose to uphold his commitment to his hometown school. He has a good feel for the barrel and could grow into solid righthanded power in time. He likely will slide into an outfield corner for the Cardinals. Catcher Will Vierling (205) is a lefthanded hitter with a disciplined approach at the plate and some projectable power. He will need to polish some rough edges defensively, but Louisville’s developmental track record with catchers is strong and he has raw tools to hone. First baseman Ryan McCoy, a junior college transfer, adds a middle-of-the-order bat to the class. His short lefthanded swing produces power and he has good hands at first base. Haven Mangrum, a junior college transfer, has plus speed that plays on the bases and in the outfield. He’s a lefthanded hitter who makes a lot of contact. Outfielder Michael Lippe is a little more physical than Dickerson but is also a righthanded hitter with a strong swing and above-average speed. Jameson Richmond, whose oldest brother Josh Richmond played for Louisville from 2008-10, has a powerful lefthanded swing and profiles as a corner infielder.

Pitchers: Patrick Forbes (278) and Tucker Biven both have two-way ability as righthanders and infielders. Forbes, named Kentucky’s Mr. Baseball this spring, has a big arm that plays both on the mound and the left side of the infield. He can run his fastball up to 96 mph and pairs it with a good slider. He also has plus raw power at the plate and projects best at third base as a position player. Biven is an excellent athlete, can run his fastball into the mid 90s and throws a lot of strikes. He has a quick righthanded swing and is a solid defender up the middle. Righthander Ethan Patera (401) has a big, 6-foot-5, 210-pound frame and a powerful arm. He attacks hitters with a good fastball-slider combination, running his fastball up to 94 mph. His delivery is a bit effortful, but he attacks hitters well. Lefthander Greg Farone this spring helped Herkimer (N.Y.) JC win the Division III Junior College World Series. He has a big build at 6-foot-5, 225 pounds and attacks hitters with a fastball-curveball combination. His fastball works around 90 mph, with more velocity in short stints, and he got a lot of swings and misses on his curveball. Lefthander Wyatt Danilowicz has solid all-around stuff. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he has a good feel for his curveball and changeup.

4. Florida

Recruiting coordinator: Chuck Jeroloman
Top recruit: Cade Kurland, SS

Overview: Florida consistently recruits at a high level and this class is another example of that, as the Gators bring in a lot of premium talent. The class is deeper on the mound, but the Gators also landed some high-end position players.

Hitters: Kurland was originally a member of the 2023 prep class but graduated a year early and comes to Gainesville with the class of 2022. He was ranked as the No. 69 prep player in the 2023 class and his early arrival gives the Gators another premium player in the class. Kurland has a long track record of hitting and the righthanded hitter has some pop in his bat. He’s an average runner and a steady defender. He can play anywhere on the infield, with second base perhaps as his most natural profile, but he has enough athleticism to give him a chance to stay at shortstop. Catcher Luke Heyman (234) was in the mix as the best catcher in the prep class. He has serious raw power but isn’t an all-or-nothing hitter, also displaying solid bat control. He’s big and physical with a strong arm behind the plate. He’s a solid overall defender, though like any prep catcher his receiving still needs some polish. Infielder Tyler Shelnut was committed to Florida out of high school but started his college career at Santa Fe (Fla.) JC. Now, he joins the Gators after two strong seasons. His bat is his carrying tool and he has above-average power. He can play anywhere on the infield but may fit best on the corners for the Gators. Catcher Salvador Alvarez isn’t as toolsy as Heyman but is a solid defender behind the plate and does a lot of little things well.

Pitchers: Lefthander Cade Fisher (221) has a projectable look and stands out for his control, which was among the best in the prep class. He isn’t overpowering and his fastball mostly works in the upper 80s, but he has three solid pitches and advanced pitchability. Jake Clemente (370) has a physical 6-foot-4 frame and his velocity made a jump over the last year, now getting up to 96 mph. He pairs it with a hard slider and there could be still more in the tank as he previously was more focused on hitting. Yoel Tejada Jr. (372) is big and projectable at 6-foot-6, 205 pounds and has two-way ability as a righthander and first baseman. On the mound, his fastball gets up to 93 mph with more to come and he has some feel for spinning his breaking ball. He’s also a switch-hitter with big raw power who makes plenty of hard, line-drive contact. Lefthander Chris Arroyo was Clemente’s high school teammate and has a good three-pitch mix. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he combines it with a good breaking ball and changeup. He also could see some time in the outfield thanks to his smooth lefthanded swing. Erik Blair has two-way ability as a lefthander and outfielder. On the mound, his fastball gets up to 90 mph and he has feel for his breaking ball and changeup. His lefthanded swing and track record for hitting give him a chance to see time as a hitter as well. Righthander Clete Hartzog, a junior college transfer, can run his fastball into the mid 90s and pairs it with a good breaking ball.

5. Oregon

Recruiting coordinator: Jack Marder
Top recruit: Carter Garate, SS (No. 193)

Overview: Oregon quickly has made on-field strides under coach Mark Wasikowski, making back-to-back NCAA Tournaments and hosting regionals in 2021. Now, the Ducks have their first top-five class since 2010. The class has an impressive depth of talent and brings difference makers to Eugene, especially among position players.

Hitters: Garate long stood out for his defense, and his infield actions, hands and speed give him the tools to stay at shortstop. He’s made strides offensively and shows good contact skills at the plate. He’s lean at 6-foot-2, 160 pounds and will need to get stronger to reach his offensive ceiling, but the upside is clear. Like Garate, third baseman Drew Smith (214) stands out for his defense and a strong spring elevated his profile. He has promising bat speed and raw power and he is still just getting to his offensive potential. Dominic Hellman (304) has a big, physical frame at 6-foot-6, 240 pounds that makes for a unique profile for an infielder. He’s a good athlete with plus arm strength to go with huge offensive upside, especially as a power hitter. He could end up with top-of-the-scale power, but to tap into that juice, he’ll need to improve his approach at the plate. Outfielder Tafton Hensley (433), a junior college transfer, has an exciting combination of bat speed and plus running ability. He’s still a bit raw but could quickly step into the Ducks’ lineup. Jackson Jaha, the son of former all-star John Jaha, has two-way potential as a third baseman and righthander. He’s a good athlete with power potential and is solid defensively at the hot corner and on the mound can run his fastball up to 90 mph. Outfielder Grayson Grinsell has exciting upside and profiles as a top-of-the-order hitter. He has a quick lefthanded swing and good feel at the plate. He has two-way ability and the lefthader throws his fastball around 90 mph. Second baseman Rikuu Nishida, a junior college transfer, is coming off a breakout summer in the Cape Cod League, where he was an all-star. He has plus speed (he stole 28 bases in 43 games this summer) and good on-base skills. He’s undersized at a listed 5-foot-6, 154 pounds and has minimal power, but with his speed, defense and approach to the game, he’s an exciting addition. Sabin Ceballos, also a junior college transfer, was drafted in the 14th round by the Angels but will instead come to Eugene. He has a powerful righthanded swing and arm and can play either third base or catcher.

Pitchers: Righthander Turner Spoljaric (404), a Canadian native and the son of former big leaguer Paul Spoljaric, can throw his fastball in the low 90s and has a good feel for pitching. He mixes in both a good changeup and curveball and has the profile of a future weekend starter. Righthander Matthew Grabmann (490), also a Canadian native, has a big arm and can run his fastball up to 96 mph. He also works in a slider and changeup. His delivery has some effort to it, but his power stuff gives him a chance to make an early impact for the Ducks. Righthander Austin Anderson, a junior college transfer, is coming off a strong spring and has a solid three-pitch arsenal. Righthander Jackson Pace has a projectable build and the makings of a solid three-pitch mix.

6. Auburn

Recruiting coordinator: Karl Nonemaker
Top recruit: Hayden Murphy, RHP (No. 170)

Overview: Auburn lost eight players to the draft from the team this season that reached the College World Series, necessitating a larger incoming class. The Tigers shepherded their whole recruiting class through the draft, meaning they bring in a deep, talented group this fall.

Hitters: Outfielder Chris Stanfield (171) has top-of-the-scale speed, which plays well on the bases and in center field, where he can be a plus defender. He has solid bat-to-ball skills but will need to add strength to improve his impact at the plate. Catcher Ike Irish (173) has a strong, physical frame with good athleticism and a lefthanded swing. He has plus arm strength and is a solid receiver. He makes a lot of hard contact, and his power potential stands out at the plate. Infielder Gavin Miller is a good athlete with an easy righthanded swing that projects more power to come. He’ll likely settle in at second or third base in college. Infielder Landon Russell and outfielder Alex Wade both show offensive upside thanks to their solid approaches and line drive-oriented swings. Auburn also brings in a pair of junior college transfers who will give the Tigers more depth up the middle. Catcher Carter Wright is a solid defender behind the plate and infielder Caden Green has good defensive actions and a solid righthanded swing.

Pitchers: Murphy headlines a large group of recruits on the mound. Listed at 6-foot-3, 185 pounds, he has a lean, projectable frame but also has the polish and pitchability to quickly make an impact. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he mixes in a solid changeup and slider. As he gets stronger and builds more consistency he could take off on the mound. Lefthander Zach Crotchfelt (428) has a physical frame at 6-foot-3, 210 pounds and his fastball is difficult to square up thanks to its high spin rate. He can run his fastball up to 94 mph, but it typically sits around 90. He primarily works off his fastball and can work in a breaking ball and changeup. Lefthander Drew Nelson, the Gatorade Alabama Player of the Year, stands out for his advanced pitchability. His fastball works in the upper 80s and he has good feel for his offspeed stuff. Righthander Will Cannon comes to Auburn after spending his freshman year in junior college. His fastball gets up to 95 mph and he pairs it with a good breaking ball. He primarily pitched out of the back of the bullpen last season and can make an impact there for the Tigers. Listed at 6-foot-6, 220 pounds, righthander Cameron Keshock has a long, projectable build and he’s a good athlete who is also a standout basketball player. His fastball works around 90 mph, and he pairs it with a good breaking ball. Righthander Elliott Bray pounds the strike zone and has a fastball that sits around 90 mph.

7. Vanderbilt

Recruiting coordinator: Mike Baxter
Top recruit: Andrew Dutkanych, RHP

Overview: Vanderbilt had the No. 1 class on signing day, but it was clear then that getting it through the draft would be a challenge. That came to pass, as five of the Commodores’ commits were picked in the first round. Vanderbilt still has a talented group of freshmen, though it no longer is the nation’s best class.

Hitters: RJ Austin was ranked as a top-five round pick before he formally opted out of the draft. He’s a good athlete and has two-way potential as an infielder and righthander. He’s got speed, good defensive actions and an aggressive approach to the game. He could fill a variety of roles for the Commodores and has impactful tools. Shortstop Chris Maldonado (338) was committed to Clemson before Monte Lee was fired. He then changed his commitment to Vanderbilt and will now join his older brother Nick in Nashville. He does a lot of things well on the diamond. He’s a steady defender, has above-average speed and a simple righthanded swing that has helped him build a long track record of success. Outfielder Devan Kodali (442) is a plus runner and a good athlete, and those tools play well in center field. He has a smooth swing and good bat-to-ball skills. He has some power projection, but he’ll need to get stronger to tap into it. Shortstop Ivan Arias is undersized at 5-foot-8, 170 pounds but stands out for his glove and feel at the plate. He doesn’t strike out much and is an advanced defender—two traits that could get him on the field early in his career. Cooper Holbrook, the son of College of Charleston coach Chad Holbrook, profiles as a corner bat and has an advanced understanding of the game. Catchers Logan Poteet and Cade Law give the Commodores strong depth at the position. Poteet stands out for his glove, while Law is a good athlete and had some football offers as a quarterback. Shortstop Matthew Wolfe has advanced defensive skills. Ray Velazquez has the versatility to play nearly anywhere on the diamond and is coming off a solid summer in the Futures League.

Pitchers: Dutkanych was seen as a potential first-round pick before he formally removed his name from the draft, becoming the latest premium pitcher to come to Vanderbilt. He has power stuff and a strong build at 6-foot-3, 205 pounds. His fastball reaches 95 mph, and he also has a pair of good breaking balls that he can land for strikes. Righthander David Horn also has some strides to make with his control but has plenty of upside on the mound. He has an easy delivery, a fastball that reaches 93 mph and intriguing secondary offerings. Lefthander JD Thompson is a bit undersized but has advanced pitchability and throws three pitches for strikes. His fastball can get into the low 90s but his success is more about his ability to locate and mix in offspeed pitches.

8. Duke

Recruiting coordinator: Justin Seely
Top recruit: Beau Sylvester, C (No. 152)

Overview: The Oklahoma State class underwent some significant changes during the summer, as the Cowboys took advantage of some coaching changes to add premium talent. They also lost a couple players, most notably No. 1 overall pick Jackson Holliday, but the end result is a class that still ranks as the best in the Big 12.

Hitters: Sylvester was committed to Washington until Lindsay Meggs retired in June. The Hawaii native instead comes to Stillwater following an impressive summer in the West Coast League that saw him hit eight home runs in 33 games. Sylvester has plus righthanded power and showed a patient approach at the plate. He’s got plus arm strength that plays well behind the plate. He has upside to develop as a catcher, but he’s athletic enough to play first base or an outfield corner. Outfielder Nolan Schubert (380) was committed to Michigan until the coaching change in Ann Arbor. The Michigan native has a big, strong frame at 6-foot-6, 210 pounds and packs plenty of power into his righthanded swing. He fits the classic right field profile and should develop into a middle-of-the-order hitter. Tyler Wulfert, a junior college transfer, can do a bit of everything and offers defensive versatility. He’s a good athlete and an above-average runner who’s coming off an impressive spring at the plate. Shortstop Phoenix Meza stands out for his defense at premium positions up the middle. He’s a plus runner and this summer was the MVP of the Connie Mack World Series. Colin Brueggeman, a junior college transfer, adds a powerful lefthanded bat to the class. He fits as a corner outfielder or first baseman and can fill a role similar to what Jake Thompson did in recent seasons.

Pitchers: Lefthander Brennan Phillips (194) stands out for his pitchability. He can run his fastball into the low 90s and throws a lot of strikes with four pitches. His advanced feel for pitching and overall tools give him a chance to take on a significant role right away for the Cowboys. Listed at 6-foot-7, 210 pounds, righthander Gabe Davis (199) has a lanky, athletic build and plenty of upside. His fastball gets up to 94 mph now with plenty of room for more velocity as he physically matures, and he has some feel for his breaking ball and changeup. He played a lot of basketball growing up and is still a little raw on the mound, but if he can refine some of his rough edges, he has all the tools to make a big jump in Stillwater. Lefthander Brant Hogue and righthander Evan O’Toole were teammates at Iowa Western JC and now transfer together to Oklahoma State. Hogue throws from a low three-quarters slot and makes for a tough at-bat with a fastball that sits around 90 mph. O’Toole throws in the low 90s and has good feel for spin. Righthander Luke Fernandez has a powerful arm, and his fastball reaches 95 mph. His fastball-breaking ball combination could play right away for the Cowboys. Lefthander Michael Benzor has flown under the radar but has a projectable build and a promising three-pitch mix that could make him the sleeper of the class. Righthanders Kade Shatwell and Manning West give the class two more high-upside arms, though they have some rough edges to hone.

9. Mississippi State

Recruiting coordinator: Jake Gautreau
Top recruit: Colby Holcombe, RHP (No. 157)

Overview: After a disappointing last-place finish in the SEC West in 2022—coming on the heels of the 2021 national championship—Mississippi State brings a massive, talented class to Starkville. It’s full of players who can make a quick impact, as the Bulldogs look to quickly rebound this spring.

Hitters: Catcher Ross Highfill (257) is a good athlete with a strong arm, giving him all the tools to develop into a standout defender. He’s also got power potential as a righthanded hitter and above-average speed, though there is some swing and miss to his game. Outfielder Dakota Jordan (377), the Gatorade Mississippi Player of the Year, was committed to Mississippi State to play both baseball and football, but ultimately opted just to focus on baseball. He has premium bat speed and massive righthanded power potential. He was recruited as a running back in football and has elite speed on the diamond. He has some rough edges to his game, but now that he’s focusing on baseball full-time, he could soon access his upside. Catcher Ryan Williams gives the class another strong defender behind the plate. His glove is ahead of his bat, but he’s a switch-hitter with upside. Infielder David Mershon is a switch-hitter with plus speed and advanced feel for the game. His tool set plays well at the top of the lineup and he could play anywhere up the middle of the diamond. Jay Murdock and Hollis Porter both have similar profiles as powerful lefthanded sluggers. Porter has a bit more athleticism and could be a corner outfielder, but both combine feel for hitting with significant power potential. Nate Chester, a junior college transfer, can play anywhere on the infield and has an advanced approach at the plate.

Pitchers: Holcombe is physically imposing at 6-foot-7, 225 pounds and has a big arm to match. His fastball this spring touched 100 mph and sat 93-95. His slider is his best secondary offering, and he shows promising feel for it. His changeup is developing, and he also works in a curveball. Holcombe is still a bit raw, but his upside is massive. As a switch-pitcher, Jurrangelo Cijntje (259) is an ultra-rare prospect. He has power stuff as a righthander, running his fastball up to 96 mph to go with a power breaking ball. From the left side, his fastball sits in the upper 80s, touching 91 mph, and he has a sweeping breaking ball. He throws a lot of strikes from both arms and has the stuff to continue as a switch-pitcher. He’s a bit undersized from a pro perspective, but he’s a unique talent and can make an immediate impact in Starkville. He’s also a switch-hitter and can play up the middle of the infield, but his biggest impact is expected to be on the mound. Lefthander Bradley Loftin (264) came on strong this spring and ran his fastball up to 95 mph. He has a projectable build, a changeup that can be a plus pitch and solid pitchability. If he continues on his current trajectory, he offers big upside. Righthander Will Gibbs attacks hitters with a strong three-pitch mix. His fastball gets up to 94 mph and he figures to take on important innings early in his career. Righthander McLain Ray has a long, projectable build and touches 94 mph with his fastball. Righthander Logan Forsythe runs his fastball up to 96 mph and he mixes in a good slider. Righthander Tyson Hardin, a junior college transfer, converted to pitching two years ago but has already shown lots of promise and athleticism on the mound. His fastball works in the low 90s and he pairs it with a good slider. Righthander Nathan Williams, a junior college transfer, is recovering from Tommy John surgery. Before his injury, he ran his fastball up to 96 mph with a powerful breaking ball, giving him the look of a high-leverage reliever. Righthander Evan Siary stands out for his strike-throwing ability. He fills up the strike zone, has good feel for his changeup and his fastball plays up thanks to its riding life. Righthander Austin Tommasini attacks hitters with a sinker-slider combination and can run his fastball up to 96 mph. Lefthanders Will Martin and Graham Yntema, both junior college transfers, are tough on lefthanded hitters thanks to their fastball-breaking ball combinations.

10. Texas

Recruiting coordinator: Steve Rodriguez
Top recruit: Jalin Flores, SS (No. 89)

Overview: Texas had a veteran-laden roster in 2022 and lost several players to the draft and graduation. As a result, the Longhorns brought in a large class that is especially strong among position players. Like the incoming class, Rodriguez is new to Austin himself, as he was hired this summer following seven years as head coach at Baylor.

Hitters: Flores has smooth actions at shortstop, soft hands and a plus arm—all the tools needed to play shortstop. He has a simple, easy swing and righthanded power potential. With Trey Faltine moving on to pro ball, Flores is positioned to succeed him at shortstop in Austin. Outfielder Max Belyeu (167) has big offensive upside thanks to his smooth lefthanded swing and power potential. He’s an average runner and his tools give him the profile of a corner outfielder. Jared Thomas has made some big strides over the last year and brings an intriguing skill set to the lineup. He has an advanced approach at the plate, a smooth lefthanded swing and some power projection. He is an excellent defender at first base and has enough athleticism to give him a chance as a corner outfielder. Catcher Rylan Galavan is a good athlete and has strong catch-and-throw skills. His glove is ahead of his bat, but he has upside offensively as he physically matures. Infielder Jayden Duplantier, the younger brother of Longhorns righthander Andre Duplantier, is a good athlete, has above-average speed and the tools to be a middle infielder.

Pitchers: Lefthander Chris Stuart (349) grew up in the Netherlands and pitched for the Dutch at the 2019 18U World Cup. He came to the United States for college, beginning his career in 2021 at San Jacinto (Texas) JC. He had a strong season this spring and is now headed to Austin, adding a high-end arm to the class. He attacks hitters with a good fastball-slider combination, and he can get swings and misses, though he does need to refine his control. Listed at 6-foot-6, 250 pounds, Pierce George (439) has a powerful right arm. His fastball reaches 96 mph, and he flashes a sharp slider. He’s electric at his best, but like many big prep pitchers, he needs to improve his consistency to reach his ceiling. He also has a powerful bat, but his biggest upside is on the mound. Righthander Matthew Porchas attacks hitters with a sinker-slider combination and throws his fastball in the low 90s. He too has some further refinement necessary but has starter traits. Righthander Max Grubbs and lefthander Collin Valentine are more under-the-radar arms but have the pitchability to quickly earn roles on the staff. Grubbs has a good sinker-slider combination and is reminiscent of Tristan Stevens. Valentine doesn’t have power stuff but has a projectable build and pounds the strike zone.

Dylan Lesko Billmitchell

Padres Get Their Man, Draft Dylan Lesko With The 15th Overall Pick

The Padres selected Lesko with the 15th overall pick in the 2022 draft, acquiring the top high school pitching prospect in the draft class.

11. Arkansas

Recruiting coordinator: Nate Thompson
Top recruit: Mason Neville, OF (No. 184)

Overview: The Razorbacks bring in another strong class that’s especially heavy on high-upside position players. With four regulars from their lineup drafted in the top 10 rounds this summer, those newcomers should have an opportunity to make an immediate impact in Fayetteville.

Hitters: Neville has standout athleticism and a good lefthanded swing. He’s a plus runner with a strong arm and offers a lot of upside. Infielder Jayson Jones (185) has an explosive righthanded swing that produces plus power potential. He has some swing and miss to his game, but he’s not an all-or-nothing hitter and could quickly step into the middle of the order for Arkansas. He was a shortstop in high school and has made strides defensively, but he has a big frame and may end up profiling best at third base. Infielder Harold Coll is coming off a strong season at San Jacinto (Texas) JC, where he hit 10 home runs and stole 15 bases. He’s an above-average runner and is a solid defender who figures to step in on the left side of the infield. Infielder Easton Swofford is a good athlete who has an advanced feel for the barrel. He has some power potential and projects to be able to stay up the middle defensively. Ryan Ward has a simple lefthanded swing and good plate discipline. He’s a good athlete who offers a lot of versatility defensively. Caleb Cali is coming off an All-American season at Central Florida JC, as he hit .438/.533/.826 with 17 home runs. He’s a corner infielder who fits best at first base. Hunter Grimes and Ben McLaughlin, also junior college transfers, add two more big bats to the Razorbacks’ class.

Pitchers: Lefthander Parker Coil (241) has an exciting combination of upside and pitchability. Listed at 6-foot-3, 180 pounds, he has an easy delivery and pounds the strike zone with three pitches. His fastball works in the upper 80s now with room for improvement and he pairs it with a good breaking ball. Lefthander Hunter Hollan was a two-year standout at San Jacinto (Texas) JC and was drafted by the Brewers in the 15th round in 2021. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he pairs it with a good slider. Righthander Cody Adcock, a junior college transfer, has a low-90s fastball and pairs it with a powerful curveball. Righthander Cooper Dossett is a good athlete with a big arm. His fastball gets into the low 90s now and there’s more velocity to come. He’s a good athlete and could be a two-way player as an outfielder, but his biggest upside is on the mound. Righthander Gage Wood has a low-90s fastball and good feel for spinning his breaking ball. Righthander Christian Foutch is a good athlete with a fastball that gets up to 94 mph. Righthander Ben Bybee has a big build at 6-foot-6, 225 pounds, an easy low-90s fastball and plenty to dream on.

12. Clemson

Recruiting coordinator: Nick Schnabel
Top recruit: Tristan Smith, LHP (No. 64)

Overview: The Tigers signed a top-10 class in the fall and new coach Erik Bakich and recruiting coordinator Nick Schnabel did a good job holding it together this summer. It’s headlined by Smith, the highest rated player in the draft not to sign, and the new coaching staff buttressed it with a few players who were previously committed to them at Michigan.

Hitters: Jack Crighton was committed to Michigan before the coaching change and followed Bakich to Clemson. He is a good athlete, has above-average speed, can play anywhere on the infield and has a good righthanded swing. Shortstop Nolan Nawrocki, like Crighton, was originally committed to Michigan and followed Bakich to Clemson. He has plus speed, good athleticism and makes a lot of hard contact at the plate, giving him a spark plug element. Infielder Cameron Cannarella has an athletic, projectable look. He’s a plus runner who can stay up the middle on the infield and has an easy lefthanded swing. Infielder Jack Reynolds is a lefthanded hitter with good bat-to-ball skills. He’s a steady defender with good arm strength. Nathan Hall has a good righthanded swing and projects as a corner bat, with the versatility to play third base and the outfield. Infielder J.P. Cunningham is a plus runner and athlete who can impact the game in a number of ways. Infielder Cooper Blauser, the son of two-time all-star Jeff Blauser, has a strong righthanded swing and projects to hit for power. Outfielder Lleyton Lackey is a plus runner and has exciting upside as a switch-hitter. Catcher Jacob Jarrell has a strong, physical frame that plays well on both sides of the ball.

Pitchers: Smith has a strong frame (6-foot-1, 202 pounds) and an electric fastball-slider combination. His fastball gets into the mid 90s and his slider is a hard, biting offering. He gets swings and misses with both pitches and has performed at a high level, but his control is not as advanced as his stuff. Righthander Joe Allen last summer played for USA Baseball’s 18U National Team and was committed to Michigan before the coaching change, eventually following Bakich to Clemson. His fastball works in the mid 90s and he mixes in a good changeup and slider. He has power stuff and a strong build (6-foot-4, 215 pounds). Righthander Nathan Dvorsky attacks hitters with a fastball-curveball combination from an over-the-top arm slot. Lefthander Ethan Darden offers some upside and has a promising fastball-slider combination. Lefthander BJ Bailey, a junior college transfer, attacks hitters with a fastball-slider combination and profiles in the Tigers’ bullpen.

13. Texas Christian

Recruiting coordinator: John DiLaura
Top recruit: Anthony Silva, SS

Overview: TCU has landed a top-20 recruiting class for eight straight years and this class fits right in. The Horned Frogs got a boost when Silva formally opted out of the draft, but the class also has solid depth.

Hitters: Silva was regarded as one of the best defenders in the prep class and could lock down shortstop for the Horned Frogs. He has good hands, instincts and arm strength and is an above-average runner, all the tools required to play up the middle. He’s not as advanced offensively but has a good feel at the plate and as he physically matures, he should grow into a more impactful hitter. Infielder Fisher Ingersoll (334) is a standout athlete who was also rated as a three-star wide receiver by 247 Sports. He’s focused on baseball now and brings solid lefthanded power. He has smooth hands and could end up as Silva’s double-play partner. Catcher Karson Bowen has a long track record both in high school and with USA Baseball. He’s a strong defender, has a good understanding of the game and a solid arm. The righthanded hitter has a strong swing and makes a lot of hard contact. Outfielder Marshall Lipsey is a plus runner and covers ground well in the outfield. The lefthanded hitter has a contact-oriented approach at the plate. Third baseman Cole Fontenelle began his college career at Washington before transferring to junior college and now TCU. The switch-hitter is coming off a solid summer in the Alaska League and has a disciplined approach at the plate.

Pitchers: Lefthander Chase Hoover (163) has an easy delivery, a projectable build and started to make a jump this spring—all signs that portend to further development in college. His fastball gets into the low 90s and he has promising secondary stuff, highlighted by an above-average changeup. He isn’t overpowering but throws a lot of strikes and has good feel on the mound. Righthander Justin Hackett has a strong, 6-foot-3, 215-pound frame and a big arm. His fastball sits in the low 90s, touching 95 mph, and he pairs it with a big curveball and a changeup. Righthander Louis Rodriguez was one of the more advanced pitchers in the prep class and has an impressive track record of success. He has a strong, 6-foot-2, 210-pound build and attacks hitters with a fastball-cutter combination. His fastball works in the upper 80s and he also mixes in a changeup, a repertoire that should get him on the mound quickly. Lefthander Braeden Sloan has a projectable 6-foot-4 frame and a promising three-pitch mix. His fastball gets up to 91 mph but has plenty of room for growth as he physically matures. Lefthander Ben Abeldt fits a similar profile with a lean, 6-foot-3 frame and a promising three-pitch mix. Righthander Calvin Marley has a strong build at 6-foot-4, 240 pounds. His fastball-slider combination plays well out of the bullpen.

14. Florida State

Recruiting coordinator: Rich Wallace
Top recruit: Cameron Smith, SS (No. 81)

Overview: The former Florida State staff signed a top-20 class last fall and despite a coaching change that brought Link Jarrett and his staff to Tallahassee from Notre Dame, the class remains largely intact. The Seminoles lost shortstop Nicolas Perez to the draft but Smith and outfielder Jordan Taylor (98) give them a pair of top-100 draft prospects, which is only topped by LSU.

Hitters: Smith was injured the second half of last summer, keeping him out of some big events and a little more under the radar. That changed quickly in the spring when he impressed scouts with his size (6-foot-3, 215 pounds) and loud overall tools. He’s a good athlete with above-average speed and he has above-average power potential. He’s on the bigger side for a shortstop and his glove and arm play there, but a move to third base could still be in the cards for him at some point. Outfielder Jordan Taylor (98) is a premium athlete who is a prototypical toolsy outfielder. He has elite speed, a plus arm, covers ground well in the outfield and has electric bat speed. The righthanded hitter is still refining some rough edges at the plate and a full-time focus on baseball (he was also a standout prep basketball player) could help him develop better consistency. Catcher Santiago Ordonez stands out for his defense and strong arm behind the plate. His size (5-foot-9, 190 pounds) may keep him off pro radars this spring, but he has a track record of success and will be able to handle the high-powered Seminoles’ pitching staff. Outfielder DeAmez Ross has quick hands and a good approach at the plate, consistently spraying line drives. He’s a good athlete and his frame has room for added strength as he physically matures.

Pitchers: Righthander Ben Barrett has two-way potential, bringing power both on the mound and at the plate. He has a strong, 6-foot-4, 210-pound build, throws his fastball in the low 90s and can land his offspeed stuff for strikes. The righthanded hitter also has a powerful swing and is a good athlete who can play third base. Lefthanders Jamie Arnold and Brett Barfield bring more upside to the class. Arnold is a good athlete with feel for three pitches and a projectable 6-foot-2, 168-pound frame. If he’s able to add strength as he physically matures, he could break out. Barfield isn’t quite as projectable but has an above-average breaking ball that can be a weapon for him. Righthander Davion Hickson has a projectable look at 6-foot-4, 200 pounds and a quick arm. His fastball gets up to 94 mph and he mixes in both a quality slider and promising changeup. Righthander Drake Flowers has a big, projectable build at 6-foot-5, 217 pounds and a solid three-pitch mix. His fastball works in the upper 80s now, but he should add more velocity as he physically matures, which will also help his firm slider. Righthander Ryan Denison also has a big, strong build at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds and power upside. He has an exciting fastball-curveball combination and can run his fastball into the low 90s.

15. Texas Tech

Recruiting coordinator: J-Bob Thomas
Top recruit: Jeric Curtis, OF (No. 125)

Overview: Texas Tech has a strong all-around class, bringing in some premium athleticism among the position players and an exciting group of pitchers, a few of whom made big jumps this spring.

Hitters: Curtis and Gage Harrelson (378) are two of the fastest players in the draft class and both can turn in top-of-the-scale run times. Curtis has electric speed and also ran track in high school. He’s a righthanded hitter whose quick hands give him above-average bat speed. He covers a lot of ground in center field and can be a plus defender. Harrelson, a lefthanded hitter, has a funky swing but he generates plenty of bat speed and has a long track record for hitting. He has room to fill out his 6-foot-3 frame and could grow into more power down the line. Like Curtis, he covers a lot of ground in the outfield. Shortstop Travis Sanders was drafted in the 14th round by the Red Sox but upheld his college commitment. He’s a steady defender on the infield with the arm strength for shortstop and the athleticism required up the middle. The righthanded hitter has a line-drive approach at the plate and could grow into some more power in time. Catcher Dylan Maxcey has plus arm strength behind the plate and the righthanded hitter has promising offensive tools. He has good all-around instincts and could quickly work his way into the lineup. Infielder Tracer Lopez has an advanced feel at the plate and the lefthanded hitter makes a lot of hard contact. Defensively, he has smooth actions and good arm strength, giving him the tools to play up the middle. Infielder Damian Bravo stands out for his feel at the plate and has some righthanded power potential. He has a strong arm and can play on the left side of the infield. Cade McGarrh is another speedster in the class and can impact the game in a number of ways. The lefthanded hitter has a good approach at the plate and is a versatile defender. Infielder Austin Green, a junior college transfer, is a switch-hitter with a good approach at the plate. He’s a versatile defender with the athleticism to play anywhere on the infield. Ryan Ball started his college career at Cal State Northridge before transferring to Central Arizona JC, where he this spring helped the Vaqueros win the national championship. He has a powerful lefthanded swing and is a versatile defender capable of playing second base or the outfield.

Pitchers: Righthander Zane Petty this spring made a jump and was drafted by the Brewers in the 13th round but did not sign. His fastball sits around 90 mph and there’s room for more velocity as he physically matures. His slider is a promising pitch, and he does have the makings of a good changeup. Petty this summer pitched in the West Coast League and could quickly carve out a role in Lubbock. Lefthander Taber Fast has a projectable build at 6-foot-2, 192 pounds and has good feel on the mound. His fastball gets up to 91 mph and he mixes in a promising breaking ball. Righthander Jack Livingstone came on strong this spring as he threw back-to-back no-hitters and was named pitcher of the year by the Dallas Morning News. His fastball works in the upper 80s and he pairs it with a hard slider. Righthander Jacob Rogers has a projectable build and can run his fastball into the low 90s with good life. Righthander Dax Dathe, a junior college transfer, has a strong frame at 6-foot-3, 200 pounds and a good fastball-slider combination. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he has an easy delivery.

16. Oregon State

Recruiting coordinator:  Rich Dorman and Ryan Gipson 
Top recruit: Gavin Turley, OF (No. 85)

Overview: Oregon State in 2021 brought its highest-ranked recruiting class (No. 6) to campus since 2013. The 2022 group doesn’t rank quite as high, but it’s another strong class for the Beavers, especially after Turley came to school despite being drafted in the 19th round by the D-backs.

Hitters: Turley is one of the toolsiest players in the country. He has elite speed, easy plus raw power and lightning-fast bat speed. His pure feel for hitting is the biggest open question for scouts and improving his approach at the plate would truly unlock his substantial upside. Dallas Macias (220) also has an exciting combination of loud tools and athleticism. The switch-hitter can hit for power from both sides of the plate and has a good feel for his swing. He’s got above-average speed and the versatility to play a variety of positions. Shortstop Ely Kennel was one of the best prep players in Oregon and is an excellent athlete, who earned all-state honors as a quarterback in addition to his exploits on the diamond. He has a quick lefthanded swing and makes a lot of contact, while also showing some power potential. He’s an above-average runner and a solid defender. Easton Talt is a good athlete and can play all over the diamond, including catcher, where he has a strong arm. He has an easy lefthanded swing and makes a lot of hard contact. Infielder Brandon Forrester will join his older brother Garret in Corvallis. He’s a switch-hitter with solid speed and the athleticism to play anywhere on the infield. Jacob Kreig has a big frame at 6-foot-5, 235 pounds and the raw righthanded power to match. He’s more than just a power hitter, however, and has solid feel at the plate. He profiles as a corner outfielder or first baseman. Outfielder Canon Reeder has above-average speed and uses it well on the basepaths and in the outfield.

Pitchers: Lefthander Nelson Keljo has a strong build at 6-foot-4, 210 pounds and can run his fastball into the low 90s, pairing it with a promising curveball. Righthander Aiden Jimenez, whose father Jason pitched in the big leagues, has a big 6-foot-4, 205-pound frame and throws a power sinker. His fastball works in the upper 80s and he pairs it with a good slider, making for a tough at-bat. Righthander Isaac Hill has a projectable build and attacks hitters with a promising fastball-curveball combination.

17. Duke


Recruiting coordinator: Ty Blankmeyer
Top recruit: Kassius Thomas, RHP (No. 108)

Overview: Duke last year landed the program’s first ever top-10 class when it shepherded its whole recruiting class through the draft. It wasn’t quite so lucky this year, as Cole Young was drafted 21st overall, but the Blue Devils again ended up with a premium class. This group was primarily recruited by Josh Jordan, who was hired away this summer.

Hitters: Andrew Fischer stands out for his lefthanded swing and his feel at the plate. He has a big, strong build and profiles as a corner infielder. Outfielder Vincent Fattore has a fast, whippy lefthanded swing. His easy swing and approach at the plate should help him make a quick transition to college baseball. Catcher Roman Digiacomo has a plus arm and good catch-and-throw skills. He’s further advanced defensively than offensively, but he has power potential at the plate. Tyler Albright is a plus runner and profiles in center field, where he might remind Duke fans of Jimmy Herron. Gabriel Nard has true two-way potential as an infielder and righthander. As a hitter, he has a quick righthanded swing, consistently puts the barrel on the ball and makes a lot of hard contact. He’s a bit undersized as a pitcher but has impressive feel on the mound and gets a lot of movement on his upper-80s fastball, which he pairs with a good curveball.

Pitchers: Thomas offers significant upside thanks to his three-pitch arsenal and a very fast arm. His fastball sits in the low 90s, touching 95 mph, and he mixes in a good changeup and curveball, and he fills up the zone with all three. Lefthander Oliver Santos (245) has a big, strong frame and has advanced feel on the mound. His fastball sits in the upper 80s and he can run it up to 93-94. He has room to grow into more consistent velocity in time, to go with three promising offspeed offerings. He also has a powerful righthanded swing and could see action as a two-way player. Lefthander Andrew Healy was seen as a top-10 round talent but formally opted out of the draft after an injury sidelined him nearly the whole spring. Listed at 6-foot-6, 170 pounds, he has a lot of projection and already runs his fastball into the low 90s to go with a good changeup. Righthander Aidan Weaver has a big, powerful frame and can run his fastball up to 95 mph. He might have more velocity in the tank and his changeup and slider both show promise. Lefthanders Owen Proksch and James Tallon both have projectable builds and upside remaining. Tallon throws his fastball in the upper 80s and pairs it with a sweeping slider, while Proksch has a good changeup to go with his deceptive fastball.

18. Texas A&M


Recruiting coordinator: Nolan Cain
Top recruit: Jace LaViolette, OF (No. 222)

Overview: Texas A&M is coming off a College World Series appearance in its first season under coach Jim Schlossnagle and this recruiting class will be looking to push the Aggies back to Omaha. It’s an especially strong position player group, which will add a lot of athleticism to the roster.

Hitters: LaViolette is a tremendous athlete with a big, physical frame at a listed 6-foot-5, 220 pounds. He’s a plus runner and his lefthanded swing does damage thanks to his combination of bat speed and strength. He has significant upside as a middle-of-the-order hitter. Infielder Stanley Tucker (329) was a big riser this spring thanks to a monster season at New Mexico JC. He has big tools to match his performance, as he’s a plus runner with good athleticism and makes consistent hard contact. Infielder Kaeden Kent, the son of former MVP Jeff Kent, has good feel for the barrel and an advanced approach at the plate. He has the defensive tools to play on the left side of the infield and may grow into some power as he physically matures. He also brings advanced baseball instincts and plenty of competitiveness. Catcher JD Gregson, a junior college transfer, stands out for his defense behind the plate. He has plus arm strength and provides power offensively as well. Second baseman/outfielder Travis Chestnut, a junior college transfer, has premium speed and can be a weapon on the bases. Though listed at 5-foot-8, 160 pounds, he has some pop in his bat, though his approach needs some refinement. Shortstop Justin Vossos is a well above-average runner and makes a lot of hard contact that gives him righthanded power potential. He’s a good athlete and has the defensive skills to play up the middle. Lucas Kelly has two-way ability as a third baseman and righthander and brings power in both roles. He’s got a strong righthanded swing and can drive baseballs out, while on the mound he can run his fastball up to 94 mph, though injury mostly limited him to DH this spring. Outfielder Kasen Wells adds another athletic, plus runner to the class.

Pitchers: Lefthander Justin Lamkin (246) has a big, projectable build at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds and has solid pitchability. He throws from a lower, three-quarters slot and can run his fastball into the low 90s. His breaking ball and changeup give him a pair of promising offerings and he consistently works around the strike zone with all three pitches. Righthander Blake Binderup also has a projectable build (6-foot-6, 205 pounds) and is a good athlete. His fastball touches 94 mph, and he pairs it with a good slider. Righthander Luke Jackson pounds the zone with his three-pitch arsenal and competes on the mound. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he has an athletic, up-tempo delivery. Righthander Lucas Davenport attacks hitters with a good fastball-slider combination and can touch 94 mph. Lefthander Shane Sdao has a very projectable build at 6-foot-3, 155 pounds and, like Jackson, he pounds the strike zone with his three-pitch arsenal. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he has good feel for his changeup. Lefthander Brandon Arvidson is coming on strong this fall, as he added strength and velocity. His fastball gets into the low 90s now to go with a good changeup and breaking ball. The class also includes a few junior college transfers on the mound. Righthander Jaren Warwick attacks hitters with a mid-90s fastball and a good slider. His control has taken a step forward this fall and finding more consistency in the zone will be important. Lefthander Evan Aschenbeck is a good strike thrower with a solid track record of performance.

19. Tennessee


Recruiting coordinator: Josh Elander
Top recruit: Alex Stanwich, OF (No. 219)

Overview: Tennessee has recruited at a high level under coach Tony Vitello and Elander and results on the field have followed. This is another strong class for the Volunteers, especially among position players.

Hitters: Stanwich has a strong, quick swing and he impacts the ball with authority. He still has some physical projection in his 6-foot-2 frame and has some rawness to his game (especially his approach at the plate), but the offensive upside is clear. He has above-average speed and arm strength and can play anywhere in the outfield. Outfielder Dylan Dreiling (336) isn’t as tooled up as Stanwich but does a lot of things well and has advanced baseball IQ. The lefthanded hitter has a good approach at the plate and could add more impactful power as he physically matures. Outfielder Reese Chapman has a smooth lefthanded swing and uses the whole field well as a hitter. He has big power potential, though there are some rough edges in his game to hone. Outfielder Colby Backus, a junior college transfer, is big and physical at 6-foot-5, 220 pounds. He has plenty of raw power and above-average speed but there is some swing-and-miss in his game that he’ll have to cut down on to get to his offensive ceiling. Shortstop Jake Kendro will likely remind Tennessee fans of Cortland Lawson, even down to the hair. He’s a steady defender with the arm strength and hands to play shortstop. Catcher Cal Stark, a junior college transfer, gives the Volunteers more depth behind the plate.

Pitchers: Listed at 6-foot-8, 235 pounds, righthander Hunter Sloop has a big arm and big upside on the mound. His fastball touches 97 mph and sits in the mid 90s with more velocity to come. He played a lot of basketball growing up and is still just learning on the mound. As he gets more experience, he has a chance to really take off. Righthander Dillon Orr, meanwhile, stands out for his pitchability. He pounds the strike zone with four pitches and throws his fastball in the low 90s. While innings will be hard to come by for any of the newcomers, he is advanced enough to quickly get on the mound for the Volunteers. Lefthander Jake Bimbi is coming off an All-American season at Wabash Valley (Ill.) JC. His fastball works in the low 90s and his changeup is his best secondary pitch. He’ll likely work out of the bullpen, but his stuff gives him a chance to work in longer outings. Righthanders JJ Garcia and AJ Russell have long, lean frames and offer projectability on the mound. Russell has good pitchability and if his velocity makes a jump as he physically matures, he could make a big jump in Knoxville. Righthander Austin Hunley is the younger brother of former Vols’ All-American Sean Hunley. He attacks hitters with a sinker-slider combination and is a good athlete on the mound. Righthander Aaron Combs began his college career at Coastal Carolina before transferring to junior college and now Tennessee. He has a good fastball-slider combination and should factor in the bullpen. Righthander Bryce Jenkins, another junior college transfer, stands out for his tight slider and a fastball that gets up to 94 mph.

20. Miami


Recruiting coordinator: Norberto Lopez
Top recruit: Blake Cyr, SS (No. 211)

Overview: Miami has been recruiting as well as any program in the ACC over the last few years, including landing the top-ranked 2020 class. The Hurricanes’ 2022 group is another talented one that’s especially strong in position players.

Hitters: Cyr does a lot of things well on the diamond and has a hard-nosed mentality. His speed, power and bat speed make for an exciting combination and he’s a solid defensive infielder. He has an aggressive approach at the plate but his bat-to-ball skills mean he makes a lot of contact. Outfielder Kaden Martin (385) is the son of former NFL quarterback Tee Martin (who now is the Baltimore Ravens wide receivers coach) and while he was rated as a four-star quarterback by 247Sports, he will only play baseball at Miami. He’s still a bit raw on the diamond but has impressive tools. He’s got a strong lefthanded swing and has performed on some big stages. Jason Torres (392) stands out for his hittability and his fast righthanded swing, giving him big power potential. He’s a corner infielder who will get a chance at third base but could end up at first. Ray Bermudez, Adrian Dominguez and Diego Guevara add three more exciting bats to the group.

Pitchers: Righthander Ben Chestnutt comes to Miami following an All-American season at Central Florida JC, which he helped to the Junior College World Series. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he combines it with a good changeup and breaking ball. His advanced pitchability should help him quickly take on an important role for the Hurricanes. Lefthander Ashton Crowther can run his fastball into the low 90s. He pairs it with a sharp slider and throws a lot of strikes. Lefthander Alex Walsh has a projectable build and throws his fastball around 90 mph now. He pairs it with a promising slider and changeup that gives him plenty of upside. Righthander Sebastian Perez has a big frame at 6-foot-5, 238 pounds and a big arm to match. His fastball reaches 95 mph—though typically sits lower—and he pairs it with a hard slider. He’ll likely add more consistent big velocity in time as he physically matures. Righthander Brian Walters joins his older brother Andrew, the Hurricanes All-American closer, at Miami after one year of junior college. His fastball sits in the low 90s and he mixes in a slider and changeup. Lefthander Christopher Scinta throws from a three-quarters slot and attacks hitters with a good fastball-slider combination. Righthander Ryan Fry has a projectable build but already shows solid pitchability. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he has feel for both his changeup and curveball.

21. Stanford


Recruiting coordinator: Thomas Eager
Top recruit: Malcolm Moore, C (No. 66)

Overview: Stanford’s class is small, but it held together through the draft. As a result, the Cardinal bring in the top-ranked prep player not to sign in Moore and have a top-25 class for the third time in four years.

Hitters: Moore was one of the best prep hitters in the country. He was named the California Gatorade Player of the Year in back-to-back years, an incredibly rare honor, and further impressed on the showcase circuit, especially at the Area Code Games. He has a strong offensive skill set and the lefthanded batter has an easy swing, good approach and massive power potential. He’s not as advanced defensively, but he has solid arm strength. Even if he does end up changing positions, his offensive ability will play well and he has a middle-of-the-order profile. Shortstop Jimmy Nati, an Australian native, has a physical build and solid all-around tools. The righthanded hitter has a good approach at the plate and some pop in his bat to go with the defensive tools to stay at shortstop. Outfielder Ethan Hott has a strong, compact build and his tools play well in center field. He plays aggressively, has some righthanded pop and solid speed. Infielder Gabe Springer is a switch-hitter who combines athleticism and physicality. His skill set profiles well at second or third base, but he can play anywhere on the infield. Outfielder Cort Macdonald was a three-sport star in high school and his athleticism plays well on the diamond. He makes a lot of contact with his lefthanded swing and has above-average speed.

Pitchers: Righthander Nick Dugan stands out for his pitchability and three-pitch arsenal. His fastball gets up to 95 mph and he pairs it with a sharp curveball and a good changeup. He has a starter’s profile, but average size (6-foot-1, 190 pounds). Righthander Matt Scott, in contrast, has a big frame at 6-foot-6, 230 pounds and can run his fastball up to 94 mph, though he typically sits around 90. He throws a lot of strikes and projects to add more velocity as he physically matures. Righthander Toran O’Harran missed most of the summer due to injury but at his best can throw his fastball in the low 90s. He’s a good athlete and has a chance as a two-way player thanks to his righthanded swing. Righthander Trevor Moore stands out for his pitchability and control with three pitches. He isn’t overpowering but his competitiveness and feel play well on the mound.

22. UCLA


Recruiting coordinator: Bryant Ward
Top recruit: Payton Brennan, OF (No. 218)

Overview: UCLA a year ago landed the No. 1 recruiting class in the country. This year’s class is smaller and not as flashy but is a talented group.

Hitters: Brennan has a strong 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame and has plenty of tools. He has an exciting combination of plus raw power and speed, which plays well both on the bases and in center field. He’s an aggressive hitter and will need to refine his approach. He was limited over the last year by shoulder injuries, but he has significant upside for the Bruins. Outfielder Jarrod Hocking, the son of former major leaguer Denny Hocking, has a quick righthanded swing. He isn’t overly physical at 5-foot-10, 180 pounds, but he has solid power and a good feel for the game. Infielder Andrew Walters has a long track record of performing on big stages. He offers power at the plate and is a steady defender on the infield. Outfielder Keenan Proctor is a plus runner and has a short, quick lefthanded swing. His tools play well at the top of the order. Outfielder Toussaint Bythewood has above-average speed and a good feel for hitting. He was slowed this spring by a wrist injury but played well this summer in the West Coast League.

Pitchers: Lefthander Ben Jacobs (342) built an impressive track record of performance in high school. He has a solid arsenal and earns praise for his pitchability and advanced approach on the mound. He isn’t overpowering, but his fastball touched 94 mph and he may be able to hit that velocity more consistently as he physically matures. He figures to quickly carve out a role on the Bruins staff. Like Jacobs, righthander Cody Delvecchio has a long track record of success. He’s a little undersized at 6-foot, 170 pounds, but his velocity ticked up this spring and his fastball reaches the low 90s. He pairs it with a hard slider. Righthander Michael Barnett made strides over the last year and has a solid three-pitch mix. His fastball works in the upper 80s and he throws a lot of strikes, with more gains to come as he fills out his 6-foot-4 frame. Righthander Finn McIlroy starred in water polo in addition to baseball in high school but is now focused on pitching for the Bruins. He uses his 6-foot-6 frame well and attacks hitters with a fastball-slider combination.

23. South Carolina


Recruiting coordinator: Monte Lee
Top recruit: Eli Jerzembeck, RHP (No. 129)

Overview: This is South Carolina’s 13th straight Top 25 recruiting class, a streak only bested by Vanderbilt (18) and Florida (15). The class stands out for its depth on the mound, but also includes some exciting position players.

Hitters: Ethan Petry has a big, strong build at 6-foot-4, 220 pounds and a powerful righthanded bat. He has plus raw power and still has some room to add more strength as he physically matures. He’s played mostly third base in high school and might be able to stay at the position, but his bat would still profile if he moves to an outfield corner or first base. He has two-way ability thanks to a fastball that gets up to 95 mph and good feel for spin, and he could contribute in both roles for the Gamecocks. Shortstop Will Tippett is a switch-hitter and a good athlete who profiles as a top-of-the-order hitter. He has a good approach at the plate and uses his plus speed well on the bases. He has solid defensive actions that play well up the middle. Outfielder Connor Fuhrman stands out for his offensive tools and profiles as a corner outfielder. He has some strength in his righthanded swing but is more hit over power. Catcher Zander Buchan is a switch-hitter with solid arm strength and power potential. Stone Blanton is a powerful outfielder with two-sport ability. He was rated as a four-star linebacker by 247Sports and will play both football and baseball at South Carolina. On the diamond, his big, physical frame, athleticism and raw power make for a prototypical corner outfielder.

Pitchers: Jerzembeck has a projectable 6-foot-2, 195-pound frame and offers substantial upside. His fastball was up to 95 mph and his curveball has a high spin rate that makes it one of the best in the prep class. His velocity and promising changeup have been inconsistent, however. He throws a lot of strikes and as he adds strength, he could make a big jump. Righthander Austin Williamson, like Jerzembeck, has an advanced skill set on the mound. He has a strong 6-foot-4, 220-pound build, runs his fastball into the low 90s and pairs it well with his slider. Righthander Connor McCreery has a projectable build at 6-foot-6, 205 pounds and a big arm. He came on late, as he previously was more focused on hitting, and he’s old for the class, but with a fastball that gets into the low 90s and the potential for more velocity, he has exciting upside. Lefthander Trey Wheeler has a projectable build and a promising three-pitch arsenal. Righthander Dylan Eskew, who began his college career at Miami before transferring to Chipola (Fla.) JC and now South Carolina, has the combination of stuff and track record to step right into a significant role for the Gamecocks. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he pairs it with a good slider. Righthander Zach Zedalis started his college career at North Carolina Central, before that program was shuttered. He transferred to Charlotte and then junior college before now landing at South Carolina. His fastball-breaking ball combination profiles well in the bullpen.

24. Georgia Tech


Recruiting coordinator: James Ramsey
Top recruit: Riley Stanford, RHP/OF (No. 182)

Overview: The Yellow Jackets brought in a strong, deep class that features some high-upside players. Georgia Tech saw nine players move on to pro ball from last year’s team, leaving plenty of room for the newcomers to make an impact.

Hitters: The class includes a pair of premium two-way players in Stanford and infielder/righthander Demitri Diamant. Stanford is big and physical at 6-foot-4, 230 pounds and has real power both on the mound and at the plate. He has a strong track record of success at the plate and his tools fit the traditional right field profile. On the mound, his fastball this summer got up to 99 mph and he pairs it with a power slider. Pro scouts liked him more as a pitcher, but his offensive ability is also significant. Diamant is more of a prospect as a position player thanks to his approach at the plate and easy righthanded swing. He profiles best as a third baseman, but his athleticism gives him a chance to play up the middle. He’s undersized on the mound but runs his fastball up to 93 mph and has a good feel for spin. His impact on the mound likely will come out of the bullpen. Infielder Brant Baughcum has a long track record of success at the plate and a good feel for hitting. He has a strong frame and good hands that make him a solid defender, capable of playing anywhere on the infield. First baseman Carsten Sabathia III, the son of six-time all-star CC Sabathia, has a big 6-foot-5, 230-pound frame and the righthanded power potential to go with it. Shortstop Nico Senese is a standout defender who has all the tools to play shortstop. He’s still filling out his 6-foot-3 frame but has offensive upside as he physically matures. Outfielder Parker Bosius stands out for his speed, defense and offensive upside. The righthanded hitter has a sound approach and makes a lot of contact. Outfielder Jayce Blalock has big righthanded power and, while he has a big swing, he still makes consistent hard contact.

Pitchers: Lefthander Noah Samol (360) missed much of 2021 due to Tommy John surgery but came on strong over the last year. Listed at 6-foot-7, 230 pounds, he has some projection left but already runs his fastball up to 96 mph, but this spring more typically threw the pitch around 90. He has an over-the-top delivery and works in a big curveball and promising changeup. Righthander Luke Schmolke is a little undersized at 6-foot, 185 pounds, but has standout stuff. His fastball reaches 95 mph, he has a 12-to-6 curveball and can mix in a changeup as well. His combination of mentality and stuff play well, and he could quickly find a big role on staff for the Yellow Jackets. Righthander Logan Bogue was injured this spring but built a long track record of success. He has good feel on the mound and when he’s healthy, his fastball reaches the low 90s. Righthander Terry Busse, a junior college transfer, has a strong build and should fit right into the back of the bullpen for the Yellow Jackets. His fastball reaches 97 mph and he has excellent feel for spin and is capable of throwing three distinct breaking balls. Jackson Gaspard has two-way ability as a righthander and middle infielder. He pounds the strike zone and his fastball reaches 91 mph on the mound, while he’s also a very good defender up the middle.

25. Virginia

Recruiting coordinator: Kevin McMullan
Top recruit: Jack O’Connor, RHP (No. 231)

Overview: The Cavaliers continue to recruit at a high level and bring in a strong class. It’s especially deep on the mound, combining pitchers who can make an instant impact in Charlottesville with some upside.

Hitters: Henry Godbout (354) came on strong this year, starting with a player of the year season as a prep star in Tennessee. He carried that momentum into a brief summer appearance in the Futures League. He has a good approach at the plate, a strong arm and a projectable build. If he develops more power as he physically matures, he should offer strong upside. Infielder Juan De La Cruz is a good athlete with plus speed who was a bit under the radar due to a shoulder injury his junior year. He has a quick righthanded swing and his infield actions play well up the middle. Infielder Luke Hanson has standout tools and is a good athlete, as he also was a star quarterback. He’s an above-average runner and has a good approach at the plate. Outfielder Harrison Didawick has a big 6-foot-5, 220-pound frame and a powerful lefthanded swing.

Pitchers: O’Connor has a big, strong build at 6-foot-5, 220 pounds. His fastball gets up to 95 mph and he pairs it with a cutter. He pounds the strike zone and has a promising changeup. He has strong starter traits, though refining a true putaway pitch would help him take a step forward. Lefthander Bradley Hodges has an advanced skill set and was named Florida player of the year by Prep Baseball Report after a dominant spring. He has a solid four-pitch mix, pounds the strike zone and has a good feel for spin. His fastball sits around 90 mph, and he profiles as a starter. He also is a good hitter and could see action as a two-way player for the Cavs. Righthander Cullen McKay runs his fastball up to 94 mph and pairs it with an effective breaking ball. He’s made strides over the last year and offers still more upside. Righthander Kevin Jaxel has a projectable look at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds and already has run his fastball up to 93 ph. He missed this spring due to Tommy John surgery, but at his best he controls his three-pitch mix well. Righthander Evan Dobias is a good athlete who stands out for his pitchability. His stuff isn’t overpowering but he controls it well and has good feel on the mound. Lefthander Evan Blanco controls his solid three-pitch mix well and his fastball sits around 90 mph. His control and deception makes for a tough at-bat. Aidan Teel, the younger brother of Cavaliers slugger Kyle Teel, graduated high school a year early. He can do a little bit of everything on the diamond. He has a quick lefthanded swing and his athleticism gives him a chance to play on the infield or in an outfield corner. On the mound, his fastball gets up to 90 mph and he pairs it with a good slider.

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