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2021 California Top MLB Draft Prospects



Today, Baseball America rolls out its state-by-state rankings for the 2021 MLB Draft. Additionally, you can find our:

500 Draft Rankings | 2021 MLB Mock Draft | MLB Draft Tracker


1. Marcelo Mayer, SS, Eastlake HS, Chula Vista, Calif. (BA RANK: 2)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 185 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Southern California

Mayer is the next big prospect to come out of a powerhouse Eastlake (Calif.) High program that produced Adrian Gonzalez, 2019 first-round pick Keoni Cavaco and 2020 second-rounder Casey Schmitt (by way of San Diego State). Mayer started getting attention from scouts at Eastlake as a freshman, where he showed a smooth lefthanded swing and advanced defensive actions up the middle. He capped his four-year varsity career by hitting .410 with 13 home runs in the regular season this spring while playing excellent high school competition in San Diego County’s top division. Mayer is arguably the top defensive shortstop in a class that is deep at the position. He glides around the infield with silky smooth actions and has the hands, footwork and arm strength to stick at shortstop long term. He slows the game down and has no problem throwing from multiple angles with an accurate arm. Though he is a below-average runner, he moves fluidly around the dirt and should be at least an above-average defender. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound Mayer also has upside offensively. He’s a plus hitter with excellent barrel control and extension in his swing and drives balls hard in the air from gap-to-gap. He can turn on good fastballs and drive them off the right-field fence or let pitches on the outer half travel deep and line them hard up the middle or the opposite way. He has fringe-average power now, but could tap into above-average power in the future as he fills out his projectable frame. He controls the strike zone and has a calm, steady presence in the batter’s box. Mayer is committed to Southern California, but as a surefire top-five pick, it’s unlikely he ever steps foot on campus. He has a chance to be taken with the top pick and join Gonzalez, who was selected first overall in 2000, in making Eastlake the only high school to ever have two players drafted No. 1 overall.

2. Matt McLain, SS, UCLA (BA RANK: 10)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 170 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: D-backs '18 (1)

McLain was the biggest riser in the 2018 draft class after a huge senior season at Beckman (Calif.) High. The D-backs drafted him 25th overall, but he was strongly committed to UCLA and did not sign. McLain rebounded from a poor freshman season for the Bruins with a strong showing in the Cape Cod League and the abbreviated 2020 season. He followed up with his best season as a junior this spring, batting .323/.429/.569 with nine home runs during the regular season despite missing nearly three weeks with a broken thumb. McLain is undersized at a listed 5-foot-11, 170 pounds, but he is a dangerous hitter who is strong in his frame. He has a short, direct swing and consistently lines balls hard from gap to gap. He has a knack for finding the barrel, separates balls from strikes and rarely chases outside the strike zone. He is a consensus above-average to plus hitter and projects to hit at the top of a lineup for a first-division team. The only question about McLain’s offensive game is how much power he will produce. Though he hit for power in college, his fringe-average raw power will likely translate more to doubles with a wood bat and limit him to 10-15 home runs per season. He has plus speed and consistently runs hard to beat out infield singles and leg out doubles and triples. McLain played shortstop the last two seasons at UCLA and is playable there, but he lacks the natural actions for the position and projects better at second base. Some teams prefer him in center field, where he played as a freshman, and others think he projects best as a multi-positional player who bounces around the diamond. He is an instinctive defender who positions himself well, gets good reads off the bat and has above-average arm strength at any position. Regardless of where he ends up defensively, McLain is one of the top hitters in the class and will be taken in the first round again this year.

3. Michael McGreevy, RHP, UC Santa Barbara (BA RANK: 16)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

McGreevy caught scouts’ attention in high school with a velocity spike at the end of his senior year, but his short track record and questions about his signability allowed him to get to campus at UC Santa Barbara. He starred immediately for the Gauchos, earning Freshman All-America honors as a multi-inning reliever before moving into the rotation as a sophomore and posting a 0.99 ERA before the coronavirus pandemic shut down the season. McGreevy picked up where he left off in 2021, assuming the Friday night starter’s role for UCSB and emerging as the best college pitcher on the West Coast. He went 9-1, 2.92 with 109 strikeouts and 10 walks in 95.2 innings during the regular season. A standout shortstop in high school, McGreevy is an excellent athlete who fills up the strike zone with four pitches. His fastball sits 91-93 mph and touches 95-96 with sink and finish to his arm side. His low-80s curveball with downer action flashes plus, and his mid-80s slider and changeup each project as average to slightly above. McGreevy stands out most for his control. He is an elite strike-thrower who walked only 30 batters in 183.1 career innings at UCSB and projects to have plus-plus control, with evaluators noting his misses are smaller than former Gaucho and reigning American League Cy Young Award winner Shane Bieber’s were at the same age. McGreevy locates his fastball to both sides of the plate, lands all three of his secondary pitches for strikes and works quickly and efficiently. With a strong, durable body at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds and an athletic, repeatable delivery, McGreevy holds his stuff deep into games and is a no-doubt starting pitcher. Most see him as a potential mid-rotation starter, but he’s young for the class at only 20 and is a candidate to take a jump in an organization with a strong player development team.

4. Carson Williams, SS, Torrey Pines HS, San Diego (BA RANK: 41)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: California

Williams won MVP of the WWBA Championships last fall and entered the spring as one of the top two-way players in the class. Most teams initially preferred him as a pitcher, but he added 10-15 pounds and began showing significantly increased power this spring to become one of the draft’s biggest risers as a position player. Williams now flashes above-average-to-plus raw power and shows the ability to get to it in games. He hit towering home runs that scraped the top of the trees beyond the left-field fence at his home stadium this spring, and even balls he mis-hit went out to his pull side. He has the ability to drive balls the other way for extra-base hits and frequently delivers in clutch situations. While Williams’ performance was loud, evaluators are divided on how much he will hit as a pro. Some see a potentially above-average hitter with plus power, but others are skeptical and see a grooved swing without a lot of adjustability and think he’ll struggle with a wood bat. Defensively, Williams is a good athlete with a polished glove and the plus arm strength to stay on the left side of the infield. He has a chance to stick at shortstop and be an average defender, but most project him to move to third base as he gets bigger. Williams sits 92-95 mph on the mound and has a short, biting slider that gets swings and misses to give him a fallback as a pitcher if his bat stalls. He is committed to Cal and will require a sizable bonus to sign.

5. Maxwell Muncy, SS, Thousand Oaks (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 43)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 170 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Arkansas

Thousand Oaks (Calif.) High has had a number of major leaguers come out of its program, including all-stars Kurt Stillwell and Jack Wilson. Wilson, the former Pirates shortstop, is now head coach at the school and helped Muncy grow into a top draft prospect. Muncy, who is not related to the Dodgers star of the same name, is a high-energy player with an athletic, strong body. He shows above-average hitting ability with a knack for driving the ball the other way and has the strong hands and wrists to project 20-plus home run potential. He studies opposing pitchers, has a mature approach and is rarely overmatched. Muncy tinkered with his stance and swing early this season and struggled, getting disconnected between his upper and lower halves and showing a long swing that was late to velocity, but he returned to his previous setup and swing at the end of the year and re-established himself as one of the top prep hitters in Southern California. He finished the regular season batting .452 with nine home runs while mostly facing good high school competition. Defensively, Muncy is an above-average runner with the instincts and footwork for shortstop, although he likely will have to move to third base if he gets bigger. He has the short-area quickness and above-average arm strength for the hot corner and enough athleticism to potentially play second base. Muncy’s hitting ability, athleticism and potential defensive versatility have him in top-two rounds consideration. He is committed to Arkansas.

6. Thatcher Hurd, RHP, Mira Costa HS, Manhattan Beach, Calif. (BA RANK: 45)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Hurd was primarily a catcher as an underclassman at Acalanes High in Northern California, but he switched to pitching and jumped on scouts’ radars with a star turn at the Perfect Game National Showcase last summer. He transferred to Mira Costa High outside of Los Angeles for his senior year and separated himself as one of the top prep pitchers in Southern California, starring at showcases throughout the fall and winter before turning in a strong senior spring. Hurd is a projectable 6-foot-4, 205-pound righthander with a chance for four above-average or better pitches. His fastball sits 88-92 mph and touches 94 out of a clean delivery and arm action and should tick up as he fills out his frame. He complements his fastball with a plus curveball in the mid 70s with downer action and a 78-80 mph slider that shows the potential to be a swing-and-miss pitch as he adds finish to it. He rounds out his arsenal with an above-average changeup. Hurd will fall in love with his breaking balls too much at times, but when he pitches off of his fastball, he cruises. Despite being relatively new to pitching, Hurd shows exceptional command and locates all of his pitches in the strike zone. He’s an astute and inquisitive learner who constantly seeks information on how to get better. Hurd will command a sizable bonus to forgo his UCLA commitment. With four solid pitches, a projectable frame, advanced command and a fresh arm, most teams are willing to pay it.

7. Ky Bush, LHP, St. Mary's (BA RANK: 47)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-6 • Wt: 240 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Royals '40 (18)

A 40th-round pick of the Royals out of high school in 2018, Bush spent his freshman year at Washington State before transferring to Central Arizona JC for his sophomore season and landing at St. Mary’s this year. A big-bodied lefthander at 6-foot-5, 240 pounds, he previously struggled with his weight but emerged this season trimmer and with a better delivery, leading to major improvements in both his stuff and control. He went 7-5, 2.99 with 112 strikeouts and 19 walks in 78.1 innings for the Gaels during the regular season. Bush is an intimidating presence on the mound and powers his fastball downhill from the left side. He sat in the low 90s and topped out at 94 early in the season, but his stuff ticked up throughout the year and he sat 93-94 and touched 96 mph by the end of the season. His best secondary offering is an above-average slider in the mid 80s that gets swings and misses, and he complements it with a potentially average changeup in the mid 80s and a usable curveball in the upper 70s he can land in the strike zone as a change-of-pace offering. Bush struggled throwing strikes in the past, but he showed above-average control this season with his improved physique and delivery. His steady improvement over the past year has teams optimistic he’s on an upward trajectory. With his size, stuff from the left side and newfound control, Bush has pushed himself into top-two rounds consideration and won’t get past the third round.

8. Gage Jump, LHP, JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. (BA RANK: 58)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 180 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Jump entered the year as one of several highly-touted players on a loaded JSerra (Calif.) High team that included shortstop Cody Schrier and righthanders Eric Silva and Luke Jewett. After impressing on the showcase circuit last summer and fall, Jump’s stuff ticked up this spring to solidify himself as the best of the bunch. Jump is an undersized lefthander at 5-foot-11, 180 pounds, but his stuff plays bigger than his size. He pitches at 91-92 mph, can reach for 93-94 mph at any time and began touching 95-96 for the first time this spring. He pitches effectively at the top of the zone with his fastball to make it a plus pitch that gets lots of swings and misses. Batters don’t see his fastball well and rarely make contact against it. Jump complements his fastball with a plus, downer curveball in the mid 70s that also draws swings and misses. He also throws a changeup that flashes plus but is inconsistent and shows feel for a nascent cutter in the low 80s. Jump’s size and arm action result in some effort in his delivery, which leads to inconsistent command and control. His fastball will occasionally sail on him, but he is an aggressive competitor who pounds the strike zone when he’s on. Jump’s size and delivery create questions about whether he can remain a starter. Most teams project him to relief, where his stuff and mentality invite comparisons to similar-sized lefties who became dominant closers. He is committed to UCLA.

9. Davis Diaz, SS/C, Acalanes HS, Lafayette, Calif. (BA RANK: 69)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 170 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Vanderbilt

Diaz first rose to prominence as a standout on USA Baseball’s 12U and 15U national teams, highlighted by his .514 on-base percentage as Team USA’s starting second baseman at the 2018 WBSC U-15 World Cup in Panama. Other players in Northern California entered this spring with more hype, but Diaz consistently outperformed them all to emerge as the region’s top prep prospect in the draft class. Diaz isn’t the biggest or toolsiest player, but he does everything well and plays the game at an exceptionally high level. At the plate he recognizes pitches, uses the whole field, shortens up with two strikes and makes consistent hard contact to project as an average to above-average hitter. He isn’t particularly big at 5-foot-11, 175 pounds, but he is sneaky strong and has a chance to reach double-digit home runs as he adds more muscle to his frame. Diaz shines on the defensive side of the ball. He is an instinctive, athletic defender who moves well in all directions, has soft hands and gets rid of the ball quickly to help his average arm play up. He’s a below-average runner, but his instincts and advanced baseball IQ help him project as an average shortstop or plus defensive second baseman. Diaz spent time behind the plate this spring and impressed evaluators with how quickly he picked up catching. His athleticism, hands, quick release and aptitude have some teams preferring him as a catcher, but others want to leave him in the middle infield. Diaz’s work ethic earns raves and should help him get the most from his ability. He is committed to Vanderbilt.

10. Brendan Beck, RHP, Stanford (BA RANK: 81)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

The younger brother of Giants pitching prospect Tristan Beck, Brendan spent four seasons in Stanford’s rotation and blossomed into one of the top pitchers in the Pac-12 Conference this spring. He went 7-1, 3.03 and finished tied for the conference lead with 106 strikeouts through the end of the regular season. Beck was previously known as a command-oriented righthander with fringy stuff, but his velocity jumped this spring to enhance his future outlook. After sitting 88-92 mph in past years, he began working 91-96 mph and set new career highs in strikeouts per nine (11.1) and opponent average (.188). Beck’s best attribute remains his feel to pitch. He has impressive command of four pitches, stays on the attack and is exceptionally poised on the mound. His mid-80s changeup is an above-average pitch he is comfortable throwing to righties or lefties in any count, his low-80s slider is an average offering that gets swings and misses and his curveball is a usable fourth offering in the upper 70s. He effectively mixes his pitches to keep hitters guessing and ties everything together with above-average control. Beck is rarely fazed on the mound and has a tendency to step up in big moments. He is a good athlete with a strong, durable frame and lasts deep into his starts. Beck’s velocity uptick has pushed him into top-three rounds consideration for some teams. He projects as a back-of-the-rotation starter who has a chance to be more.

11. Denzel Clarke, OF, Cal State Northridge (BA RANK: 86)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-5 • Wt: 220 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Mets '18 (36)

A cousin of Indians outfielder Josh Naylor, Clarke starred for Canada’s junior national teams growing up and was drafted by the Mets in the 36th round out of high school. He made his way to Cal State Northridge and began to blossom as a sophomore in 2020 before the coronavirus pandemic shut down the season. He got off to a slow start this spring but exploded in the second half to become one of the fastest risers in the draft class. Clarke is a physical specimen at 6-foot-5, 220 pounds and has some of the best power potential in this year’s draft. He has huge raw power that is easily plus, and he still has room to get stronger and add even more. Clarke was previously a raw hitter who swung at everything and struggled to keep his swing in sync, but he’s improved rapidly the last two years. He now stays on breaking balls, has begun walking more and is doing a better job of keeping his swinging consistent. His improvements to his approach, combined with his natural strength and leverage, give him a chance to be a fringe-average hitter. Clarke has a chance to stick in center field despite his size. He is a plus runner with good instincts and impressive athleticism. His below-average arm will limit him to left field if he has to move. Clarke’s swing still gets out of sync and he has to show he can maintain his improved approach against better competition. His power and athleticism have teams interested late on the draft’s first day or early on the draft’s second day.

12. Nick McLain, OF, Beckman HS, Irvine, Calif. (BA RANK: 88)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-10 • Wt: 175 • B-T: B-L • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

McLain is the younger brother of UCLA shortstop Matt McLain and followed his brother’s example of turning himself into a top draft prospect with a standout senior year of high school. Previously known as an athletic center fielder who struggled to hit against better pitching, the switch-hitting McLain refined his lefthanded swing this spring and began making consistent hard contact to send his draft stock soaring. McLain is a speedy center fielder who posts plus-plus run times and covers wide swaths of ground in center field. He is an explosive runner who gets excellent jumps, closes quickly on balls and shows excellent range in all directions to project as a plus defender. He rounds out his defense with a plus, accurate arm capable of throwing out runners from deep in the outfield. McLain previously batted righthanded before he began switch-hitting two years ago and has grown into a potentially average hitter from the left side. He has a short, compact swing with plenty of bat speed and impressive strength for his frame. His swing is more conducive to hitting low line drives, but he’s strong enough to drive the ball for extra bases. He uses the whole field from line to line and is a viable threat from both sides of the plate. Beyond just his tools, McLain is an instinctive player who makes aggressive but smart decisions in the field and on the basepaths. He does everything well and plays with an edge. McLain’s all-around ability has teams interested between the second and fourth round. He is committed to UCLA.

13. Ricky Tiedemann, LHP, Golden West (Calif.) JC (BA RANK: 91)
Source: JC • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 200 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Tiedemann drew considerable interest out of Lakewood (Calif.) High last year, but teams weren’t willing to meet his bonus demands and he went unpicked in the shortened five-round draft. Rather than stick with his commitment to San Diego State, Tiedemann enrolled at Golden West (Calif.) JC this spring to be eligible for the 2021 draft. Tiedemann has blossomed physically over the past year and now stands 6-foot-4, 220 pounds with broad shoulders and a strong, well-proportioned frame. With the increased physicality has come an uptick in his stuff. Tiedemann’s fastball now sits 89-92 mph and touches 94 with life out of a low slot that creates a difficult angle for hitters. His changeup is a plus offering he can throw at any time to lefties or righties, and it has the potential to become a plus-plus pitch as he adds more separation from his fastball. His hard slider has become consistently average. Tiedemann has lots of promising ingredients, but he’s still learning to put everything together. He underwhelmed at times this spring, posting a 3.55 ERA and allowing more than a hit per inning against subpar junior college competition, and requires a bit of projection. He is an excellent athlete who aggressively goes after hitters, but his arm slot can wander and make it harder to throw strikes. He’ll show above-average control in some outings and struggle to find the strike zone in others. Tiedemann is only 18 and younger than many players still in high school. Teams are optimistic his stuff will continue to grow and he will become more consistent with experience.

14. Cody Schrier, SS, JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. (BA RANK: 113)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 195 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Schrier is the latest in a long line of standout shortstops at JSerra (Calif.) High that includes current Cubs prospect Chase Strumpf and 2017 No. 1 overall pick Royce Lewis. Schrier played for both the USA Baseball 12U and 15U National teams, including winning MVP of the WBSC 15-U World Cup in 2018, and starred at the PG National Showcase and the WWBA Championships on the showcase circuit last year. Schrier stands out for his pedigree and all-around game more than any one tool. He battles through at-bats, drives the ball with solid bat speed, flashes above-average raw power and makes the routine plays at shortstop. He is an above-average runner with an average arm and has advanced instincts that put him in good positions to make plays. Schrier can be extremely streaky and teams have widely different assessments of him based on when they saw him. He has weeks where he’s crushing everything, but other times he shows a crude approach, struggles to hit breaking balls and has difficulty covering the outer half of the plate. Sometimes he uses the whole field, and on other occasions he is extremely pull-heavy and prone to swinging and missing. Schrier has a strong, mature body and projects to move to second or third base at higher levels. He has decent hands and projects to be an average defender who converts the routine plays. Those who like Schrier see an instinctive player with a track record of performance and consider him a candidate to be taken in the top three rounds. Others see a player without any plus tools or physical projection remaining and feel he should go to college. He is committed to UCLA.

15. Troy Melton, RHP, San Diego State (BA RANK: 119)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Melton bounced between pitching, catching and playing first base and third base in high school. Once he got to San Diego State and focused solely on pitching, his stuff jumped to make him one of the more intriguing pitchers in the draft class. Melton is an athletic 6-foot-4 righthander who is young for the class (he will be 20 on draft day) and is still growing into his body. His fastball sits 92-95 mph and touches 97, and he has the frame, athleticism and arm speed to project for more velocity to come. He shows feel to spin an average curveball in the mid 70s and a short, mid-80s slider that flashes average with late break. His firm changeup is a fringy fourth offering. Melton’s raw stuff and athleticism excite, but his fastball plays down due to a lack of deception. He surrendered a 6.14 ERA and allowed a .291 opponent average during the regular season despite playing in a pitcher-friendly home park because batters see the ball early out of his glove and track it throughout his delivery. His long arm action also gives him trouble repeating his release point. Melton’s youth, athleticism and arm strength appeal to teams who believe they can fix his issues by making mechanical changes to add deception and shorten his arm action. He projects to go early on the draft’s second day despite his performance.

16. Grant Holman, RHP, California (BA RANK: 120)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-6 • Wt: 250 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Holman first rose to fame at the 2013 Little League World Series when he pitched a no-hitter, hit a grand slam and hit a game-winning, three-run homer on consecutive days to lead California to the U.S. Championship. He followed with a decorated career at San Diego-area power Eastlake High, where his teammates included 2019 first-round pick Keoni Cavaco and projected 2021 top-five pick Marcelo Mayer, and was a preseason All-American this spring for Cal. Previously a two-way player for the Golden Bears, Holman focused solely on pitching this spring and came out showing improved stuff, although the performance didn’t quite follow. He went 1-3, 3.83 with 46 strikeouts and 22 walks in 47 innings. Holman’s fastball sits 92-93 mph and touches 96 with heavy sink out of his massive 6-foot-6, 250-pound frame. He powers his fastball downhill out of his lower three-quarters arm slot to induce lots of ground balls and swings and misses over the top. His main secondary is an average split-changeup that gets swings and misses, and his mid-80s vertical slider has started to flash above-average, although its low spin rate concerns analytically-minded teams. Holman’s size and arm strength are appealing, but he has fringy control and his injury history is concerning. He had back issues in high school and missed the first month of this season with biceps tendinitis. The 47 innings he threw this season were the most of his career. Holman’s big frame and health record have many teams projecting him to a relief role. He projects to be taken early on the draft’s second day.

17. Eric Silva, RHP, JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. (BA RANK: 124)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 180 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Silva teamed with Gage Jump to give JSerra (Calif.) High one of the best high school pitching duos in the country this spring. After impressing during the fall with the Braves scout team, Silva touched 97 mph in a high-profile exhibition in the spring to enhance his draft stock and continued to pitch well throughout the high school season. Silva is a small-framed righthander who is undersized, but his stuff is plenty big. His fastball sits at 90-94 mph and touches 97 out of a clean delivery, and his fast arm speed allows him to reach that velocity without much effort. He throws his fastball for strikes and maintains his command deep into his starts. Silva complements his heater with a short slider in the low 80s that flashes above-average, and he occasionally throws a changeup in the mid 80s that is a little too firm. Silva stays in and around the zone and has impressive pitchability in addition to his stuff. Evaluators have concerns about Silva’s long-term durability with his size and how hard he throws. He began this season sitting 93-97 but tired as the year went on and finished sitting 90-93. Those concerns have many teams projecting Silva to the bullpen as a pro, although a few give him an outside chance to remain a starter. He is committed to UCLA and will be expensive to sign.

18. JT Schwartz, 1B, UCLA (BA RANK: 128)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 210 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Schwartz ranked No. 456 on the BA 500 out of high school and was one of UCLA’s top recruits in the 2018 class. After redshirting his freshman year and having the 2020 season cut short by the coronavirus pandemic, Schwartz got his first chance at a full season this spring and hit .405/.528/.635 with seven home runs during the regular season despite missing time with a shoulder injury. Schwartz is a superb contact hitter who projects to hit for a high average. He makes an elite amount of contact on pitches in the strike zone and doesn’t chase out of the zone. He had significantly more walks (35) than strikeouts in the regular season (22) and projects to be at least an above-average hitter. Schwartz looks the part of a power hitter at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, but his swing and approach are geared for contact. He stands close to the plate and takes short, inside-out swings aimed at pushing balls the other way. He flashes average raw power and will turn on soft stuff, but his approach, swing path and average bat speed mostly yield line drives for singles and doubles. Schwartz is limited to first base defensively by his below-average speed and general lack of mobility. He previously had hip surgery and knee problems in addition to this year’s shoulder injury, so his health is a concern. Schwartz’s physicality and excellent contact skills are enticing to teams who believe they can help him tap into more power. He projects to be taken early on the draft’s second day.

19. Sean Sullivan, RHP, California (BA RANK: 140)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 170 • B-T: B-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Sullivan teamed with Grant Holman to give Cal one of the most touted starting pitching duos on the West Coast this spring. After impressing in the Cape Cod League in 2019, he took over as the Golden Bears’ Friday night starter this season and went 4-5, 3.68 with 75 strikeouts and 22 walks in 78.1 innings. Sullivan is an athletic righthander with four pitches, an advanced feel for pitching and a competitive streak on the mound. His fastball averages 90-91 mph and touches 94, and he effectively mixes in his above-average slider, average curveball and average changeup to keep hitters guessing. Though none of Sullivan’s offerings is plus, everything plays up with his command and feel for sequencing. He has excellent fastball command and can throw any of his secondary pitches for a strike at any time. Sullivan is young for the class and still has room to add weight and strength to his frame. He has a clean delivery and arm action and is an excellent athlete who gets off the mound and fields his position well. Sullivan projects as a safe back-end starter for most evaluators. If he adds strength and starts throwing harder, he has a chance to be more.

20. Larson Kindreich, LHP, Biola (Calif.) (BA RANK: 161)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 210 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Kindreich first jumped on scouts' radars as a projectable lefthander with velocity to come at the Area Code Games in high school. He grew into that promise at Biola (Calif.) and established himself as the top Division II player in the draft class with a standout showing in the Northwoods League last summer. Kindreich has an appealing pitcher’s frame at 6-foot-4, 210 pounds and sits 92-94 mph from the left side. His changeup is a potential plus pitch and he shows feel to spin a potentially average curveball that has flashed higher. Kindreich has a starter’s frame and repertoire, but his control and velocity have been inconsistent throughout his career and his performance this spring was underwhelming. He posted a 3.83 ERA against poor Div. II competition and allowed four or more runs in half of his starts. His fastball velocity dropped into the 80s at one point in the middle of the season, but he rebounded to return to the low 90s at the end of the year. Kindreich’s pure stuff fits in the top five rounds, but concerns about his control and performance have him just outside of that range for many teams. He is expected to pitch in the Cape Cod League and has a chance to raise his stock there.

21. Ian Villers, RHP, California (BA RANK: 172)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-6 • Wt: 245 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Padres '18 (19)

A 19th-round pick of the Padres out of high school, Villers spent three seasons as one of Cal’s top relievers and logged a 2.84 ERA in a team-high 29 appearances this spring. The 6-foot-6, 245-pound righthander ranged from 91-96 mph on his fastball during the regular season, but began sitting 94-97 mph and holding it over four-inning stints in the Cape Cod League to raise his draft stock. He previously showed the ability to ramp up to 96-97 mph, but generally pitched in the low 90s to gain better control of his fastball. Villers has an average slider that gets swings and misses and his curveball and changeup both flash average, although they are mostly fringy and aren’t big parts of his arsenal. Villers’ size and arm strength long intrigued teams and his performance in the Cape elevated him into top-five rounds consideration. He has a chance to be a high-leverage reliever if he shows he can maintain his velocity spike.

22. Roc Riggio, 2B/OF, Thousand Oaks (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 179)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-9 • Wt: 180 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Oklahoma State

Riggio teamed with Maxwell Muncy to make Thousand Oaks (Calif.) High a premier destination for scouts this spring. Muncy led the team in most offensive categories, with Riggio right behind him. Riggio is undersized at 5-foot-9, 175 pounds, but he is strong in his frame and has a natural feel for hitting. He has loose hands, grinds out quality at-bats and has a good feel for the barrel. Riggio can occasionally get too big in his swing and be too pull-heavy, but at his best he shows the approach and contact ability to be a potentially above-average hitter. Riggio has bulked up considerably in an effort to try and hit more home runs and started taking more aggressive swings this spring. Some evaluators think he can get to average power in time, but most think he’ll have below-average power once he starts swinging a wood bat. Riggio’s best position is “hitter” and he faces a lot of questions defensively. He doesn’t move well enough to play center field with speed that ranges from below-average to average and his hands and actions are stiff at second base. He has spent time in right field, but his fringe-average arm doesn’t fit there either. Riggio’s lack of a position complicates his future outlook, but his natural hitting ability from the left side has teams interested. He is committed to Oklahoma State.

23. Eddie Saldivar, 2B, San Joaquin Memorial HS, Fresno, Calif. (BA RANK: 183)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-10 • Wt: 165 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Long Beach State

Saldivar struggled to hit at the Future Stars Series at Fenway Park last fall, but his speed and athleticism nonetheless stood out to evaluators. Once he began hitting this spring, he became one of the fastest-rising prospects on the West Coast. Saldivar has a loose, whippy lefthanded swing that generates a lot of hard contact. He has an advanced approach for a high schooler and consistently finds the barrel. He projects to be at least an average hitter and, though he’s only 5-foot-11, 175 pounds, makes so much quality contact he may reach double-digit home runs as he adds strength to his frame. Saldivar is limited to second base defensively and has a chance to be an average defender who makes the routine plays. He is an above-average runner and has the above-average arm strength to turn double plays or make throws from deep up the middle. Saldivar needs to add considerable weight and strength to his frame, but his pure hitting ability from the left side has teams interested on the draft’s second day. He is committed to Long Beach State.

24. Darren Baker, 2B, California (BA RANK: 189)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 175 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Nationals '17 (27)

Baker is best known as the three-year old Giants batboy who ran onto the field during Game 5 of the 2002 World Series and was scooped up by J.T. Snow at home plate to save him from a potential collision. The son of then-Giants and current Astros manager Dusty Baker, Darren has worked to create a baseball legacy independent of his childhood fame. A 27th-round pick of the Nationals out of high school, Baker started four years at Cal, was a Cape Cod League all-star and had his best season this spring. He hit .327 with a .401 on-base percentage and was tied for eighth in the nation with 28 stolen bases through the end of the regular season. Baker is a smart, instinctive player who knows his game and doesn’t try to do too much. He stays in the strike zone, rarely swings and misses and sprays the ball to all fields with a contact-oriented swing. Baker is extraordinarily skinny and has almost no power (he hit only one home run in four years at Cal) but he began driving the ball harder this spring and has a chance to be an average hitter. Baker’s best tool is his speed. He is a borderline plus-plus runner and has the advanced instincts to be an efficient basestealer. He is an above-average defensive second baseman who moves quickly around the keystone, and some teams think his speed and instincts will allow him to play center field. His fringe-average arm precludes him from playing shortstop. Baker’s ability to hit, run and play up the middle have teams interested on the draft’s second day. His high baseball IQ gives him a chance to play above his pure tools.

25. Kevin Kendall, OF, UCLA (BA RANK: 197)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-10 • Wt: 175 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Kendall has been a scout favorite since his days at La Mirada (Calif.) High, but he never put together the performance to match his tools until this spring. After missing the 2020 season with a wrist injury, Kendall returned to hit .355/.409/.496 during the regular season as UCLA’s leadoff hitter and set new career highs in doubles (14) and home runs (four). Kendall is one of the most athletic and versatile college players in the draft class. He is nearly a plus-plus runner, was a plus defender at shortstop and showed he could play an above-average center field this season when he moved off of short in deference to Matt McLain. He is also a plus defender at second base and has the athleticism and instincts to play almost any position on the field. He has had injuries to his wrist and shoulder, so his arm strength will range from below-average to above-average depending on the day. At the plate Kendall has good hand-eye coordination and a loose, lefthanded swing to project as a potentially average hitter. He swung and missed too much in the past, but he made significant improvements to his approach this year and began chasing less to cut down on his strikeouts. Kendall lacks physicality and projects for below-average power, although he does flash the ability to drive the ball out to his pull-side. He uses his speed effectively on the basepaths and stole 32 bases in 141 career games. Kendall’s defensive versatility is his best asset and he projects to hit enough to stick on a big league bench. He is in the mix to be taken on the draft’s second day.

26. Jaden Fein, OF, San Diego State (BA RANK: 200)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 210 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Fein arrived at San Diego State as one of its top recruits in the 2018 class and quickly became a staple of the Aztecs lineup. He was named Mountain West Conference co-freshman of the year in 2019, hit well as a sophomore before the 2020 season shut down and hit .389/.456/.553 as a junior this spring. Fein is a big, 6-foot-3, 210-pound outfielder with impressive contact skills and latent raw power he hasn’t tapped into yet. He has a solid feel for the barrel, has the strength to drive balls when he connects and uses the whole field. Fein mostly drives the ball on a line up the middle and the opposite way for singles and doubles, but he flashes plus raw power to his pull side. He hit only four home runs this spring in a hitter-friendly conference, so evaluators aren’t sold he’ll be able to tap into his power in the future. He is a below-average runner who played right field in college and projects to left field in pro ball with his below-average arm. He may have to move to first base if he slows down any more. Fein’s physicality and knack for contact have teams interested on the draft’s second day. How much he’s able to tap into his power in pro ball will determine how high he rises.

27. Jake Miller, RHP, San Diego (BA RANK: 205)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 210 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Miller ranked No. 484 on the BA 500 out of high school and spent two seasons as the Friday night starter at San Diego. While many of the expected top college pitchers in the West struggled this spring, Miller was steady throughout the year and went 6-2, 2.52 with 77 strikeouts and 17 walks in 60.2 innings. Miller is a physical righthander who stands 6-foot-2, 210 pounds and has an advanced feel for pitching. His fastball sits at 90-91 and touches 94-95 mph with four-seam ride that helps it play up in the zone. Miller attacks with his fastball and effectively mixes his secondary pitches to keep batters guessing. His average changeup keeps hitters off-balance, although he’ll occasionally fall in love with it and throw it too often. His slurvy breaking ball is a fringy, but usable, third offering he can land for strikes. Miller pitches more than overpowers, but he’s consistent and effective. He does have some effort in his delivery and has had control issues in the past, so some teams believe he will ultimately end up in relief. Others see the pitchability to remain a starter and are interested in taking him on the draft’s second day.

28. Cam Butler, OF, Big Valley Christian HS, Modesto, Calif. (BA RANK: 212)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Cal Poly

Butler emerged from relative obscurity to become one of the draft’s biggest pop-up prospects this spring. Despite playing poor competition at a tiny high school in a remote locale, Butler’s tools and athleticism were prolific enough to send high-level decision-makers rushing in to see him before the season ended. Butler has a strong, athletic frame at 6 feet, 185 pounds and a well-rounded skill set on both sides of the ball. Though his swing is a touch stiff, he has plenty of bat speed and the strength to project for plus raw power at maturity. He hit home runs this spring that cleared the pine trees beyond the left-field fence at his home field and landed in a nearby parking lot. Butler has some crudeness to his game and will swing and miss, but he keeps improving and optimistic evaluators see the tools to project him becoming an average hitter with above-average power. Butler is an impressive athlete who makes Derek Jeter-esque backhanded plays and jump throws from shortstop. He is a plus runner who is light on his feet and has the plus arm strength to make throws from anywhere on the field. Butler isn’t particularly polished and may move to second base or center field at the higher levels, but he is athletic enough to stand in at shortstop and provide defensive versatility up the middle. Butler has rarely faced good competition and requires a lot of projection, but his strength and athleticism have teams interested. He draws high marks for his work ethic and has the makeup to get the most from his natural ability. He is committed to Cal Poly.

29. Tanner Bibee, RHP, Cal State Fullerton (BA RANK: 217)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Bibee is the latest Cal State Fullerton righthander with solid but unspectacular stuff and a track record of throwing strikes. After going unpicked in the shortened 2020 draft, he returned to school this spring and went 7-6, 3.61 with 67 strikeouts and 21 walks in 89.2 innings as the Friday night starter for the Titans. Bibee goes after hitters with a solid three-pitch mix. His fastball sits 90-93 mph and touches 95, his above-average slider is his strikeout pitch and his changeup is a usable third offering. Bibee has excellent fastball command and throws both of his secondaries over the plate, but none of his offerings misses an overwhelming number of bats. He relies on staying off of the barrel, drawing weak contact and keeping hitters on the defensive with his aggressive, competitive tempo. Bibee doesn’t have a particularly high ceiling, but his ability to fill the strike zone with three pitches has teams interested in the middle of the top 10 rounds.

30. Caiden Huber, SS, Yucaipa (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 220)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 185 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Southern California

Huber is the latest standout from Yucaipa (Calif.) High, the rural California high school that produced current Mets starter Taijuan Walker and Orioles reliever Tyler Wells among other big leaguers. Former White Sox infielder Matt Davidson, a supplemental first-round pick out of Yucaipa in 2009, is Huber’s uncle. After impressing with the Brewers scout team in the fall, Huber put on 20 pounds this spring and emerged as one of the top prep hitters in Southern California. He hit .321/.500/.543 during the regular season while playing excellent competition in the region’s top high school division. Huber now stands a promising 6-foot-4, 195 pounds and has a loose, lefthanded swing. He recognizes pitches, stays in the strike zone and has shown the ability to handle both good velocity and quality breaking pitches. He projects to be at least an average hitter and has above-average raw power that evaluators are optimistic he will eventually tap into. Huber is a solid defender at third base who should have no problem staying at the position. He is an average defender with an average arm and makes all the routine plays. Huber has promise, but he requires a lot of physical projection and will need many years of strength gains to reach his power potential. Teams that are willing to be patient have interest on the draft’s second day if he makes himself signable. He is committed to Southern California.

31. Nick Nastrini, RHP, UCLA (BA RANK: 221)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Nastrini drew considerable draft interest in high school as a projectable righthander with a polished delivery. He grew into his projected velocity at UCLA and entered the year considered one of the best pitching prospects on the West Coast, but his control deteriorated rapidly in what became a miserable season. Nastrini walked 38 batters and threw nine wild pitches in 31.1 innings. He was demoted from the rotation to the bullpen in April and made only one appearance the final month of the season. Nastrini has grown into a big, physical righthander with plenty of stuff. A sturdy 6-foot-3, 215 pounds, Nastrini has a fastball that ranges from 92-96 mph as a starter, touches 98 in relief and plays up with high spin rates at the top of the strike zone. He has feel for a potentially plus changeup and his breaking ball has flashed plus at its best, although it is inconsistent and will get caught in between a slider and curveball. While there is no doubting Nastrini’s stuff, his inability to find the strike zone got worse as the year went on, to the point most observers believe he has the yips. He failed to record an out in either of his final two outings, walking all three batters he faced and throwing two wild pitches. Nastrini is a good athlete who threw strikes in the past, so teams are hopeful they can build his confidence back up and get him back to his previous form.

32. Rodney Green, OF, El Cerrito (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 227)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 160 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: California

Green popped up late in the draft process and had evaluators racing in to see him at El Cerrito High, located about 10 miles north of Oakland. He was so under the radar in his youth that even Cal’s recruiting coordinator first learned about Green from his barber, who showed him a social media clip of the young outfielder. What Green lacks in name recognition, he makes up for in pure athleticism. A 6-foot-3, 180-pound center fielder, Green has a quick lefthanded swing, the potential for plus power as he fills out, above-average speed and lots of physical projection remaining. He has loose hands, lithe, athletic actions and has shown rapid improvement in a relatively short time. While Green has lots to dream on, he is still very raw as a baseball player. He has rarely faced good competition and still swings and misses too much against below-average high school pitching. He has below-average arm strength due to poor throwing mechanics and his speed plays down because he is still learning how to steal bases. Green is a long-term project who needs a lot of reps and hands-on coaching. His raw athleticism and tools have teams interested in hopes of a big payoff down the road. He is committed to Cal.

33. Cole Cummings, SS, UC Santa Barbara (BA RANK: 235)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 205 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Cummings hit .333/.463/.509 as UCSB’s starting third baseman and No. 2 hitter through the end of the regular season. He is a steady performer who lacks big tools but expertly manages the strike zone, puts the bat on the ball and makes all the routine plays defensively. He has doubles power and recorded nearly as many walks (45) as strikeouts (46) for the Gauchos this season. Even without any standout tools, Cummings’ strike-zone discipline, knack for contact and all-around performance have teams interested on the draft’s second day.

34. Matt Ager, RHP, Foothill HS, Pleasanton, Calif. (BA RANK: 244)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-5 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UC Santa Barbara

Ager has long had appealing traits with his projectable 6-foot-5 frame, clean delivery and picturesque arm action, and he began drawing considerable attention when his velocity jumped from 87-89 mph to 91-93 this spring. He wasn’t able to maintain that velocity bump throughout the season, but his progress nonetheless piqued teams’ interest. Ager needs time but has a lot of potential. He mostly pitches at 87-90 mph, but his frame and delivery give scouts confidence he’ll sit 94-96 mph once he adds strength and fills out. His fastball plays up with carry through the strike zone and has the potential to be a plus pitch. Ager’s breaking ball has the shape and bite to be an above-average or better pitch once he adds power to it. He shows feel for a nascent changeup and throws plenty of strikes out of a clean, repeatable delivery. Ager is easy to dream on, but his present stuff is lacking and he has years of strength gains ahead. He is committed to UC Santa Barbara.

35. Scott Randall, RHP, Sacramento State (BA RANK: 258)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 172 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Long known for his immaculate control at the front of Sacramento State’s rotation, Randall led the nation with an 11.44 strikeout-to-walk ratio this spring and showed a velocity bump to enhance his draft stock. After ranging from 87-91 mph in previous years, Randall began sitting at 90-92 mph and touched 96 this season without sacrificing any of his plus-plus control. He went 7-2, 2.89 with 103 strikeouts and only nine walks in 87.1 innings for the Hornets. Randall’s stuff doesn’t jump out on paper, but everything plays up with his command and deception. His fastball is sneaky and gets on hitters faster than they expect to draw swings and misses in the strike zone. His best secondary is an above-average changeup he uses to keep hitters off-balance and his slider is a fringy but usable offering he can land for strikes. Randall mostly beats hitters with his fastball and goes right after them with it. He trusts his stuff, doesn’t nibble and has the command to exploit holes in batters’ swings. Randall’s performance and improved stuff have teams interested on the draft’s second day or early on the third day. He is a fourth-year junior and projects to sign.

36. Rodney Boone, LHP, UC Santa Barbara (BA RANK: 261)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 175 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Boone teamed with Michael McGreevy this spring to give UC Santa Barbara one of the best starting pitching duos on the West Coast. While McGreevy received most of the draft attention, Boone actually had the lower ERA (2.20) and higher strikeouts per nine innings (11.7) of the two during the regular season. Boone is a soft-tossing lefty who succeeds on command and deception. His fastball sits 86-88 mph and tops out at 90 mph, but he hides the ball well in his delivery and it gets on hitters quicker than they expect. His best pitch is a plus changeup in the low 70s that gets hitters lunging and keeps them off of his fastball. Boone mostly lives on those two pitches. He has a curveball in the low 70s he can land for strikes, but it lacks bite and he rarely uses it. He gets ahead of hitters with his fastball and finishes them with his changeup and locates both with above-average control. Boone will need to improve his fastball velocity and tighten his breaking ball to project as a back-end starter. His track record of performance from the left side has teams interested.

37. Blake Burke, 1B, De La Salle HS, Concord, Calif. (BA RANK: 267)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 235 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Tennessee

Burke struggled on the showcase circuit last summer but re-emerged this spring in better shape and showed some of the best raw power in the draft class. He hit .554 for his high school team and showed plus-plus raw power that invited colorful adjectives from observers. Burke is a big, physical masher at 6-foot-3, 232 pounds and still has room to get bigger and stronger. He has a sound lefthanded swing and has flashed the ability to get to his power in games, although his swing occasionally gets too long and he can get caught out front. Burke is a good athlete for his size. He moves well around the bag at first base and might be playable in left field. He is committed to Tennessee and will require a sizable bonus to sign.

38. Wyatt Hendrie, C, San Diego State (BA RANK: 272)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Cubs '19 (10)

The Cubs drafted Hendrie in the 10th round out of Antelope Valley (Calif.) JC in 2019, but he did not sign and made his way to San Diego State. He immediately took over as the Aztecs starting catcher in 2020 and blossomed this spring, batting .379 with nine home runs, 52 RBIs and nearly as many walks (22) as strikeouts (25). Hendrie is a converted outfielder who is a plus athlete behind the plate. He has plus arm strength, plays with energy and shows the hands and footwork to be an average to above-average defender. His throwing accuracy, footwork and receiving have been inconsistent in the past, but they have gradually improved with experience and made significant gains over the course of this season. He has the strength and toughness to withstand the physical toll of catching and works hard for his pitchers behind the plate. Hendrie’s bat is a bit light, although he showed improved power this season and led SDSU in home runs. His solid barrel control and good strike-zone discipline give him a chance to be a fringe-average hitter. Hendrie’s power still projects to be below-average once he starts swinging a wood bat, but that may be enough with the defense he brings. He is an above-average runner, rare for a catcher, and went 8-for-8 on stolen bases this season.

39. Tyree Reed, OF, American Canyon (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 278)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 180 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Oregon State

Reed starred as the starting center fielder for USA Baseball’s 15U National Team at the WBSC U-15 World Cup in Panama in 2018 and was considered one of the best high school players in the nation as an underclassman. He entered this year considered a potential first-round pick, but he battled injuries throughout the year and struggled when he was on the field. He hit .258 with zero home runs while mostly serving as a DH for his high school team. Reed looks the part at a strapping 6-foot-3, 195 pounds with a powerful lefthanded swing. He’s a good athlete who has above-average raw power, has shown the ability to play all three outfield positions and has flashed above-average arm strength. While Reed’s physical appeal is obvious, he has a lot to improve. He is a below-average hitter with a crude swing and an undisciplined approach that features a lot of chasing outside the strike zone. He has strength and leverage in his swing, but he has yet to prove he can handle good velocity or advanced breaking stuff. Reed has slowed down as he’s filled out and is now a below-average runner who projects to move to a corner, while his arm has become more of a fringy tool. Reed battled a knee injury last summer and a shoulder injury this spring, so the hope is his struggles were a result of his injuries and he’ll return to form when healthy. His pedigree and physique still hold some appeal, but most teams are willing to let him honor his commitment to Oregon State.

40. Mike Peabody, OF, UC Irvine (BA RANK: 284)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 200 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Peabody long stood out for his athleticism but faced questions about how much he would hit. After scuffling during the pandemic-shortened 2020 season, he hit .353/.481/.583 with a team-high eight home runs in the regular season this spring to lead UC Irvine to the Big West Conference title. Peabody is an athletic, lefthanded-hitting center fielder with physicality and tools. He stands 6-foot-4, 200 pounds, is a plus runner, has an average arm and has average raw power. He has a chance to stay in center field and uses his speed better in the outfield than on the bases. Peabody’s tools are evident, but how much he will hit remains a question. He has a long swing that results in too many swings and misses and he doesn’t walk often, although he frequently gets hit by pitches. Amazingly, he had more hit-by-pitches (24) than walks (23) during the regular season this year. Peabody’s tools and improved performance this year have teams interested on the draft’s second day. How much he can cut down on his swings and misses will determine how high he rises.

41. Sean Mullen, RHP, UCLA (BA RANK: 288)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Rockies '18 (35)

A 35th-round pick of the Rockies out of high school, Mullen barely pitched his first two seasons at UCLA before breaking out this spring. He began the year as a midweek starter who pitched in relief on weekends, but he worked his way into the weekend rotation during conference play and led the Bruins in wins (nine), strikeouts (87) and ERA among starters (3.19). Mullen’s fastball sits 88-92 mph as a starter and ranges from 92-96 mph as a reliever. His fastball isn’t exceptional, his mid-80s vertical slider is a dominant pitch he uses liberally. He can land it in the zone for called strikes or bury it for swings and misses. He also has a nascent cutter that shows promise and a low-80s changeup he’ll throw for strikes. Mullen is a good athlete, but his control is below-average. He pitches exclusively from the stretch and has some effort in his delivery, leading most evaluators to project him to relief.

42. Trenton Denholm, RHP, UC Irvine (BA RANK: 293)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Red Sox '17 (26)

A 26th-round pick of the Red Sox out of high school, Denholm was the Big West Conference pitcher of the year as a sophomore and didn’t allow an earned run in 32.2 innings over two years in the Cape Cod League. Teams had high hopes for him heading into both the 2020 and 2021 seasons, but his stuff declined as he battled injuries. After dealing with elbow inflammation and going unpicked in the five-round 2020 draft, Denholm suffered a foot injury at the start of this season and posted a 4.94 ERA while allowing a .298 opponent average against mid-major competition. Denholm is an undersized righthander listed at 5-foot-11, 180 pounds and relies on his command to succeed. His fastball sits 88-90 mph and occasionally touches 93-94 mph. His upper-70s curveball flashes average and his mid-70s changeup is an above-average pitch. Denholm has above-average control, but his command went backward this year and he often got too much of the plate. He allowed 88 hits in 74.2 innings, including 25 extra-base hits. Denholm’s stuff doesn’t leave him much margin for error, so he has to rediscover his previous command. His pedigree gives him a chance to be taken on the draft’s second day.

43. Jesse Bergin, RHP, UCLA (BA RANK: 294)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Bergin prepped at Harvard-Westlake High in Los Angeles, the same school that produced Max Fried, Lucas Giolito and Jack Flaherty, and spent three years in UCLA’s rotation. He entered this spring with big expectations but wasn’t able to meet them in a disappointing season. He went 6-3, 4.24 with 62 strikeouts and 21 walks in 74.1 innings during the regular season and allowed more than a hit per inning. Bergin is big and physical at 6-foot-4, 205 pounds, but his stuff is mostly average. His fastball sits in the low 90s and plays up a bit with his extension. He mostly throws his fastball and will go to his average slider to try and get swings and misses. Bergin’s delivery is stiff and his effortful arm action concerns evaluators. He projects best in the bullpen where his fastball might jump to the mid 90s in short stints.

45. Anthony Susac, RHP, Jesuit HS, Carmichael, Calif. (BA RANK: 295)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 215 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Arizona

Susac looked like potentially one of the top prep pitchers in the class at the Perfect Game National Showcase last summer, but he had elbow surgery in the fall and missed the entire season. His fastball sat in the low 90s when he was healthy and he flashed both a plus slider and a plus changeup. Susac is committed to Arizona and expected to reach campus after missing the season. His cousin and former high school teammate Daniel Susac is a catcher for the Wildcats.

45. Ben Ramirez, 3B, Southern California (BA RANK: 300)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 200 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Cubs '17 (35)

A 35th-round pick of the Cubs out of high school, Ramirez started four years at Southern California while bouncing around to different positions. He settled in as the Trojans’ starting third baseman this spring and hit .304 with 10 home runs and 54 RBIs, all of which led the team. Ramirez is more solid than exceptional. He’s an average defender at third base with an above-average arm and has the versatility to play second base. He makes decent contact from the left side and projects to be a potentially fringe-average hitter. Ramirez’s biggest development this spring was his power increased from well below-average to potentially fringe-average. He doesn’t project to hit enough to be an everyday player, but his increased power gives him a better chance to stick on a big league bench with his defensive versatility. He projects to be taken late on the draft’s second day or early on the third day.

45. Ali Camarillo, SS, Otay Ranch HS, Chula Vista, Calif. (BA RANK: 309)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 165 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Cal State Northridge

Camarillo played for the Giants scout team in the fall and popped up as a draft prospect during the spring. He’s a slick defensive shortstop with a lean, wiry frame and has the range, hands and lateral agility to stick at the position. He has above-average arm strength and projects to be at least an average shortstop. Camarillo is very thin and has a long way to go offensively. He has bat speed and feel for the barrel but lacks the strength to impact the ball. He has room to add weight and strength to his 6-foot, 170-pound frame but projects to always be a defense-first player. He is a below-average runner on the basepaths and may slow down as he gets bigger. Camarillo’s shortstop defense has some teams interested near the back of the top 10 rounds. He is committed to Cal State Northridge.

47. Ryan Higgins, 3B, Fresno State (BA RANK: 316)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Higgins entered the year known as one of the best college hitters in Northern California and lived up to that reputation with a big season at Fresno State. He hit .352 with 11 home runs and 41 RBIs and showed enough to convince evaluators his success will translate to higher levels. Higgins is a strong, physical righthanded hitter at 6-foot-1, 200 pounds. He has a good approach, a sound swing, controls the strike zone and has plenty of bat speed and raw power. His above-average bat speed and natural strength produce long home runs that overcome unfavorable wind conditions or high walls to still get out. He swings hard and will swing and miss like most power hitters, but he makes enough contact to project to be an average hitter who hits 18-20 home runs if he gets enough at-bats. Higgins lacks a position and will have to hit to earn playing time. He is a third baseman by trade but is most likely to end up at first base or DH. He could potentially be below-average but playable in left field. Higgins’ lack of a position complicates his outlook, but his bat has many believers and may push him into the top 10 rounds.

48. Jacen Roberson, OF, Cal State Bakersfield (BA RANK: 319)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 175 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Dodgers '18 (24)

The Dodgers drafted Roberson in the 24th round out of high school after he popped up late in the draft process, but he opted to stick with his commitment to Cal State Bakersfield. Roberson redshirted his freshman season in 2019 and only played in 11 games before the coronavirus pandemic shut down the 2020 season. Given his first chance to play a full season this spring, Roberson hit .282/.366/.542 and led the Roadrunners in runs (30), doubles (10), triples (three) and home runs (seven). Roberson was known as an intriguing but raw athlete in high school and is still fairly raw because he didn’t play many games in college. He is an above-average to plus runner, has a plus arm and has a chance to be an above-average to plus defender in center field with more experience. He has bat speed and average raw power, but his swing path still needs a lot of work for him to be successful against higher-level pitching. Roberson’s athleticism has teams interested toward the back of the top 10 rounds. He needs more reps than a typical college draftee and will be a slow mover.

49. Ruben Ibarra, 1B, San Jose State (BA RANK: 327)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-5 • Wt: 290 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Ibarra is massive at 6-foot-5, 290 pounds, but his performance was so loud this spring that high-level decision-makers came away impressed more often than not. Ibarra is a giant slugger who hit .381 with 14 home runs for San Jose State this spring. He has average bat speed, is enormously strong and showed a good feel for the strike zone with more walks (28) than strikeouts (24). Ibarra is a well below-average runner, but he’s surprisingly athletic for his size and plays a perfectly fine first base. He was a three-sport standout in high school who excelled in basketball and football in addition to baseball. Ibarra’s size naturally leads to expectations he’ll be a DH, but others think he can stick at first. Ibarra’s power, performance and surprising athleticism have teams interested late on the draft’s second day or early on the third day. He is a redshirt junior and could be used as a money-saving pick.

50. Billy Cook, OF, Pepperdine (BA RANK: 329)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 100 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Cook drew significant draft interest last season but went unpicked in the shortened five-round draft. He got off to a slow start in 2021 and missed five weeks after he suffered an oblique injury and Pepperdine paused its season due to Covid-19 protocols, but he went on a tear after he returned and led the West Coast Conference with 17 home runs. He hit .450 with 12 home runs in the final month of the season. Cook is tremendously strong in his 6-foot-1, 200-pound frame and shows above-average power that has a chance to be plus. He muscles up on every swing and makes extremely hard contact when he connects. Cook’s swing can get long and he will tinker with different stances and approaches. He has flashed the ability to hit good pitching, but his swing creates questions about how much contact he will consistently make at higher levels. Cook is a good athlete who is an above-average runner with an average arm in the outfield. He primarily played center field at Pepperdine and has a chance to stick there if he can improve his routes and reads with experience. Cook’s power and athleticism have teams interested in taking a chance on him at the end of the draft’s second day or early on the third day.

51. Tim Tawa, SS/OF, Stanford (BA RANK: 331)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 191 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Tawa was an all-state quarterback in addition to being a baseball star at West Linn (Ore.) High and won Gatorade State Player of the Year in both sports. He arrived at Stanford as a top recruit and started all four years for the Cardinal, but he suffered frequent injuries and hit just .267.318/.438 in his college career. Tawa’s best trait is his versatility. He’s a capable defender at shortstop, second base and center field and has the arm strength to play third base. He has flashed some wiry strength and feel for the barrel at the plate, but he’s never been healthy enough to have sustained success. His latest injuries this spring were lower back tightness and a recurring hamstring strain. Tawa’s defensive versatility interests some teams on the draft’s third day. He needs to stay healthy and prove he can hit to rise.

52. Bryan Woo, RHP, Cal Poly (BA RANK: 340)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Woo wasn’t widely known in high school, but he showed such promising stuff in the Alaska League the summer after he graduated that teams tried to sign him as a nondrafted free agent. He stuck with his commitment to Cal Poly and spent three seasons bouncing between starting and relieving for the Mustangs. Woo’s stuff ticked up this spring to make him one of the fastest risers on the West Coast, but he suffered an elbow injury in mid April and had Tommy John surgery. Woo’s fastball sits 91-95 mph as a starter and 94-96 mph as a reliever out of a loose, clean delivery. He’s a good athlete and still has room to add strength and throw harder, with some evaluators predicting he will touch 100 mph in the future. Woo’s fastball has been hittable at times, but when he locates it to his arm side, it gets under righthanded hitters’ hands and leaves them largely helpless. His slider is developing and began flashing above-average shortly before he got hurt. Woo was used heavily at Cal Poly and will need to rehab after surgery, but teams are interested in his arm strength and athleticism and see him as an intriguing buy-low candidate.

53. Alonzo Tredwell, RHP, Mater Dei HS, Santa Ana, Calif. (BA RANK: 341)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-7 • Wt: 225 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Tredwell is physically huge at 6-foot-7, 225 pounds and was considered one of the best players in the draft class as an underclassman, but he had Tommy John surgery in January 2020 and has barely pitched the last two seasons. His fastball sat in the low 90s with life and he flashed an average slider and changeup the last time he pitched extensively. Tredwell is also a power-hitting first baseman who generates loud contact from the left side, but his future is on the mound. He is committed to UCLA.

54. Josh Alger, RHP/1B, Roseville (Calif.) HS (BA RANK: 345)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 170 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Alger has some of the best pure arm strength in the high school class but also has a long injury track record. He had Tommy John surgery as an underclassman, missed the summer showcase circuit after injuring his knee playing basketball and had shoulder surgery this spring. Alger has filled out his projectable frame and was up to 97 mph this spring before getting hurt. He is committed to UCLA and will likely reach campus.

55. Nick Brueser, 1B, Stanford (BA RANK: 353)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 212 • B-T: R-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Brueser won the High School Home Run Derby at Petco Park during 2016 All-Star Weekend, including hitting a home run that reached the third deck of the Western Metal Supply Co. Building in left field. He struggled in limited playing time during his first three seasons at Stanford, but he broke out in a big way this spring. Brueser led the Cardinal with a .321 batting average and finished second on the team with nine home runs heading into the College World Series. Brueser is a big, 6-foot-3, 212-pound slugger who has plus raw power to his pull side. He generally uses an inside-out swing to hit the ball the other way to right-center, but his strength gives him a chance to tap into above-average power in games. Brueser will swing and miss and he struggles against elevated fastballs in particular. He is a good athlete who is a potentially plus defender at first base and should be playable in the corner outfield spots. Brueser is an appealing senior sign candidate with his power and athleticism. He projects to be taken late on the draft’s second day or early on the third day.

56. Matt Rudick, OF, San Diego State (BA RANK: 367)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-9 • Wt: 170 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Rudick played for USA Baseball’s 15U National Team in high school and had a productive four-year career at San Diego State. He hit over .300 in each of his first three seasons, hit well in the Cape Cod League before his junior year, won MVP of the San Diego League last summer and finished his college career by batting .410 this spring. Rudick lacks big tools, but he can hit. He consistently puts the bat on the ball from the left side, almost never strikes out (he struck out nine times in 178 at-bats this season) and takes an advanced, mature approach. He is mostly a singles hitter and possesses little power, but he knows who he is and doesn’t try to do too much. He is a pest at the top of the order who wears pitchers out and sets the tone for his team. Rudick played center field for the Aztecs but projects to move to left field with his fringe-average speed and average arm. He is a candidate to be taken as a senior sign on the draft’s third day.

57. Wyatt Young, SS, Pepperdine (BA RANK: 368)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-7 • Wt: 160 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

The 5-foot-7 Young stood out for his instincts and advanced feel for the game as a high schooler in Hawaii, but he needed to prove himself in college before teams were ready to invest in him. He did his part by batting .318 over three years as a starter in Pepperdine’s middle infield and hit .338 in the Cape Cod League before his junior year. Young is a supreme contact hitter with a short, handsy swing from the left side. He has an aggressive approach and doesn’t walk much, but he stays in the strike zone, rarely swings and misses and has a chance to be an average hitter simply because he puts the ball in play so often. Young has well below-average power and hit only four home runs in three years at Pepperdine. He occasionally lifts the ball into the gaps for doubles, but he’s primarily a singles hitter who uses his excellent bat control to direct the ball through holes in the defense. Young is a fringe-average runner and with below-average arm strength projects to be a second baseman long term. His instincts help him position himself well and make plays he otherwise might not be able to. Those who like Young see an instinctive player who makes a lot of contact from the left side and has a track record of playing above his tools. Others see an undersized second baseman with little power or speed and have limited interest.

58. Myles Emmerson, C, Cal Poly (BA RANK: 372)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Other college catchers on the West Coast entered the year with more hype, but Emmerson steadily outperformed most of them on both sides of the ball and became a scout favorite as the season progressed. He hit .312 for the Mustangs, finishing second on the team behind only top 2022 draft prospect Brooks Lee in hits, runs and doubles, and impressed defensively behind the plate. Emmerson briefly played shortstop at Cal Poly and is a good athlete for a catcher. He is a quiet receiver with soft hands, has good footwork, is flexible and doesn’t take pitches off. He has above-average arm strength and is accurate throwing from all angles. Emmerson has a contact-driven swing and tries to shoot the ball up the middle of the field. He has well below-average power and didn’t hit a single home run for the Mustangs this spring, but he has a chance to be an average hitter with his approach and contact ability. Emmerson is one of the oldest players in the draft and just completed his fifth year at Cal Poly. His defense and contact skills have teams interested in him as a senior sign candidate.

59. Zach Pettway, RHP, UCLA (BA RANK: 376)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 210 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Pettway spent four years in UCLA’s rotation and was the Bruins’ Opening Day starter as a sophomore and junior. He entered this year expected to be one of UCLA’s top pitchers, but his stuff regressed and he had his worst season. He went 2-5, 4.89 as the Friday night starter for the Bruins and got worse as the season went on. Pettway succeeds more on deception than stuff even when he’s going well. His fastball sits at 87 mph and touches 91 at its best and plays up with elite extension, and his stop-and-start delivery disrupts hitters’ timing. But at the end of this season his fastball averaged 85 mph and topped out at 89, leading to lots of hard contact and short, ugly outings. Pettway’s above-average changeup is his best secondary. His low-70s breaking ball is a below-average offering. Pettway has the command to work the corners and avoid the middle of the plate, but at his current velocity, his stuff is hittable even when he locates his pitches. Pettway needs to return to his previous velocity to have success moving forward. He is a senior sign candidate for an analytically-inclined team who likes his extension and past performance.

60. Christian Robinson, OF, Stanford (BA RANK: 382)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 211 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Padres '17 (27)

Robinson was a 27th-round pick by the Padres out of Viera (Fla.) High and one of Stanford’s top recruits to get to campus, but he spent his first two seasons as a part-time player for the Cardinal and scuffled in his first season as a full-time starter in 2020 before the coronavirus pandemic shut down the season. He finally clicked this spring as a senior and hit .308 with six home runs and 36 RBIs during the regular season as Stanford’s starting right fielder. Robinson has a strong 6-foot-2, 212-pound frame and huge raw power, but he has struggled to get to it in his career. He’s tinkered with his swing a lot and found success this season after he lowered his hands and became less stiff and rotational in his swing. He posts huge exit velocities and has the promise of tapping into more raw power from the left side. Robinson is a good athlete who can play all three outfield positions. Whether he can continue improving his swing and tap into his power will determine his future outlook.

61. Marcos Castanon, 2B, UC Santa Barbara (BA RANK: 411)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Castanon fell under the radar in high school playing in talent-rich Southern California, but he frequently outperformed more high-profile players and set his school's record for most career hits. He continued that trend as a four-year starter at UC Santa Barbara and hit .412/.508/.742 this spring through the Gauchos’ regional opener despite missing almost two months with a broken hand. Castanon is a strong 6-foot, 195-pound infielder who just plain hits. He has solid bat speed, controls the strike zone and has a natural feel for the barrel. He crushes fastballs, stays on breaking balls and drives the ball with authority from center to left field. He began tapping into power more this year and hit a career-high eight home runs in only 25 games. There are no doubts about Castanon’s bat, but finding a position for him is challenging. He is a below-average runner, has a below-average arm and has poor range at second base because he doesn’t move well laterally. He has a thick build with a strong lower half and projects to slow down more with age. Castanon’s bat fits in the top-10 rounds, but his defensive limitations make him a Day Three draft candidate for most teams. He is a fourth-year junior considered likely to sign.

62. Noah Cardenas, C, UCLA (BA RANK: 441)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Cardenas entered the year considered one of the top catchers in the draft class after a strong summer with the Santa Barbara Foresters in the California Collegiate League, but he regressed in the spring and struggled mightily on both sides of the ball. He hit just .252 with five home runs for the Bruins and drew critical reviews of his defense. At his best over the summer, Cardenas showed an above-average to plus arm, was an excellent blocker and was active behind the plate in working for his pitchers. During the season, however, his arm was average, he had careless drops and his effort behind the plate drew scathing reviews from scouts. Cardenas has shown the ability to be an above-average catcher in the past, so teams hope he can return to that previous form. Cardenas’ strike-zone discipline also regressed from the summer to take away one of his best offensive traits. He has below-average bat speed and little power, so his offensive value is dependent on him cutting down on his strikeouts and drawing more walks. Cardenas’ past performance and a general lack of catching depth have some teams still interested in drafting him near the end of the draft’s second day, although most teams now consider him a Day Three talent.

63. Gabriel D'Arcy, OF, JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. (BA RANK: 466)
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 220 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Arkansas

D’Arcy supplied the power on a loaded JSerra (Calif.) High team that included top draft prospects Cody Schrier, Gage Jump and Eric Silva. He impressed while playing for the Brewers’ scout team in the fall and solidified himself as one of Southern California’s top prep power prospects this spring. D’Arcy is a physical 6-foot-3, 220-pound righthanded hitter who hits balls a long way. He is strong in his frame and has the power to drive balls out to any part of the park. He makes loud contact when he connects, but he still has holes in his swing that he’ll need to close at higher levels. D’Arcy has days where he turns around velocity, stays on breaking balls and makes solid contact to all fields, and other days where he swings and misses at everything. He moves well for his size and posts average run times. D’Arcy is committed to Arkansas. His physicality and power give him promise, but his inconsistencies as a hitter have most teams leaning toward letting him go to college.

64. Anson Aroz, C, Placer HS, Aubrun, Calif. (BA RANK: 473)
Source: HS • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 185 • B-T: B-R • Commitment/Drafted: Oregon

Aroz stood out at the Area Code Games last summer and became a favorite of both coaches and scouts. He maintained that interest with an excellent senior spring for Placer (Calif.) High, batting .515 and playing strong defense behind the plate. Aroz is a switch-hitting catcher who is a bit undersized at 5-foot-11, 185 pounds, but shows promising tools on both sides of the ball. He is a good athlete who is a polished receiver and has above-average to plus arm strength behind the plate. He has a loose, flexible body and the potential to be an above-average defender. Aroz has a good swing and a feel for contact from both sides of the plate and power from the left side. His ultimate power output may be limited by his size and strength, but he has a chance to hit enough for a catcher. Aroz is committed to Oregon and will require a sizable bonus to sign. Teams like his talent but aren’t sure they can buy him out of his college commitment.

65. Alex Williams, RHP, Stanford (BA RANK: 476)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 208 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Williams had Tommy John surgery in March 2020 shortly before the season shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. He returned this spring and slowly worked his way back by starting in Stanford’s bullpen before moving into the rotation in late April. He got progressively stronger as the year went on and capped his return with a dominant start in the Super Regionals, throwing a two-hit shutout with 10 strikeouts against Texas Tech to send Stanford to its first College World Series since 2008. Williams lacks big stuff but makes up for it by filling up the strike zone and mixing his pitches to keep hitters off-balance. His fastball averages 90 mph and touches 94 and his slider is an average pitch that induces weak contact. He was previously known for those two pitches, but his 79-81 mph changeup with arm-side drop became a swing-and-miss offering this year to help him average a strikeout per inning. Williams ties everything together with above-average control and has an innate feel for pitching that helps everything play up. He showed his durability by topping 100 pitches in back-to-back starts during the NCAA Tournament. Williams will have to prove he has enough stuff to succeed in pro ball, but his performance at the end of the year has teams willing to give him a shot.

66. Jack Winkler, SS, San Francisco (BA RANK: 489)
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Winkler long impressed with his defensive ability at shortstop but failed to hit for most of his college career. His bat finally came around this spring and he hit .307/.382/.505 with seven home runs, 39 RBIs and 23 stolen bases for San Francisco, all career highs. Winkler is a solid all-around player and a quality defensive shortstop. He is a steady defender with a tall, lean frame and an excellent glove that picks up everything hit in his area. He has solid range with his above-average speed and makes all the plays he should. He projects to be at least an average defender at shortstop and has the athleticism to potentially move around the diamond in a utility role. Winkler has a good swing and average raw power but has struggled with consistency at the plate. His improvements this spring give him a chance to be a below-average hitter with enough power to be a threat. Winkler projects to be a potential utilityman if he can maintain his offensive improvements from this season. He is in the mix to be selected on the draft’s third day, although a few teams have expressed interest earlier.

67. Tyresse Turner, INF/OF, Southern California
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-10 • Wt: 170 • B-T: B-R • Commitment/Drafted: Marlins '19 (38)

A 38th-round pick of the Marlins out of high school, Turner didn’t put up loud numbers this spring as a draft-eligible redshirt freshman but intrigues as an athletic switch-hitter who can play multiple positions. He is a plus runner who played second base, center field and left field in college and is capable of playing all of them in pro ball. His plus speed and athleticism play on the basepaths and helped him go 19-for-22 in stolen bases in only 40 games this season. Turner is a patient hitter who finds ways to get on base, including frequently being hit by pitches, and lets his speed work on the bases. He is a stronger hitter from the right side, but is very thin and has well below-average power. He mostly drops singles in front of outfielders and is able to leg out doubles and triples when he pulls balls down the line. Turner is still young and has time to add strength to his frame. His speed and defensive versatility have teams interested in taking him if he makes himself signable.

68. Charlie Saum, C, Thousand Oaks (Calif.) HS
Source: HS • Ht: 5-11 • Wt: 180 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Stanford

Saum is one of the best defensive catchers in the class and helped lead Thousand Oaks (Calif.) High to the CIF section championship game this year. Undersized but athletic at 5-foot-11, 180 pounds, Saum is a good athlete behind the plate who has soft hands in receiving, gets out of the crouch quickly and shows an average, accurate arm that could tick up as he gets stronger. He has the requisite intelligence and leadership skills for the position and projects to be at least an above-average defender. Saum has solid contact skills at the plate and stays up through the middle of the field. He added some strength and power this spring, but he still projects as a below-average hitter with below-average power whose defense will carry him. Saum is committed to Stanford and will require a sizable signing bonus. His natural defensive abilities give him a chance to be a high pick out of college in three years.

69. Dennis Boatman, RHP, Sacramento City JC
Source: JC • Ht: 6-5 • Wt: 225 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Boatman jumped on radars when he beat Matt Manning in a playoff matchup as a high school sophomore. He began his college career at UCLA but transferred back home to Sacramento (Calif.) City JC and went 2-0, 2.17 with 33 strikeouts and five walks in 29 innings for the Panthers this spring. Boatman is a big righthander at 6-foot-5, 225 pounds and has lots of raw arm strength. His fastball sits 93-94 mph and touches 96 out of his big frame. His slider is a fringy offering that shows good shape but not much spin. Boatman has fringy control, although he showed an improved ability to limit his walks this spring. Interested teams are banking on his slider improving in player development to help him become a power-armed, two-pitch reliever. He is in the mix to be taken on the draft’s third day.

70. Jamal O'Guinn, 3B, Southern California
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 220 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

O’Guinn showed an intriguing mix of power and patience throughout his time at Southern California but never quite put it all together. He went unpicked in the shortened five-round draft last year and hit just .262 with eight home runs for the Trojans this spring. O’Guinn is a big, powerful righthanded hitter at 6-foot-4, 220 pounds. He stays within the strike zone, draws walks and flashes plus power, but he doesn’t use his lower half well in his swing and struggles to get to his power consistently. O’Guinn is decently athletic for his size and played both third base and right field for the Trojans. He has plus arm strength, although his accuracy can be iffy. O’Guinn’s swing needs significant work, but his on-base skills and raw power have teams willing to take a flyer on him.

71. Luke Jewett, RHP, JSerra Catholic HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 195 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

Jewett entered the year expected to form a fearsome pitching trio with top draft prospects Gage Jump and Eric Silva at JSerra (Calif.) High, but he had a platelet-rich plasma injection before the season and spent the year as a position player only. He is committed to UCLA and expected to reach campus after not pitching this season.

72. E.J. Andrews, OF, Fresno State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Pirates '18 (36)

Andrews popped up late in the draft process as a prep and was drafted by the Pirates in the 36th round out of storied Long Beach (Calif.) Poly High. He stuck with his commitment to Fresno State and blossomed as a junior this spring, batting .325/.430/.524 with nine home runs and 29 RBIs. A long, lean athlete in high school, Andrews has filled out and now has a strong, physical body. He’s matured in his game and posted nearly as many walks (32) as strikeouts (37) this spring for the Bulldogs while setting a career high in homers. Andrews played center field in college but projects to fit in left field in pro ball now that his body has filled out. He has the bat to profile at the position if he can continue making positive gains.

73. Mike Jarvis, SS, San Diego State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 5-10 • Wt: 170 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: San Diego State

Jarvis is one of the oldest players in the class as a redshirt senior but has enough tools to be a senior sign. He hit .367 with 16 stolen bases as San Diego State’s leadoff hitter this spring. Jarvis is a plus-plus runner with an above-average arm. He has the athleticism and instincts to play all over the diamond, including shortstop, and shows just enough contact ability to potentially stick as a utilityman. He’s a fringe-average hitter who will sneak in some doubles and triples and hit the occasional home run. Jarvis has a chance to be taken on the draft’s third day or on the second day as a senior sign. His brother, Luke, played at Auburn and was drafted by the Marlins in the 25th round in 2018.

74. Eldridge Armstrong, 3B, Oaks Christian HS, Westlake Village, Calif,
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R •Commitment/Drafted: San Diego State

Armstrong sat 87-88 mph in the fall playing for the Brewers scout team, but he experienced a small velocity uptick in the spring to boost his stock. Armstrong now pitches at 89-91 mph and touches 93. He has some pure arm strength to work with and could continue adding velocity as he matures. Armstrong also plays third base but isn’t a very natural hitter. His future is on the mound and he is likely to end up honoring his commitment to UCLA.

75. Alfredo Ruiz, LHP, Long Beach State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 200 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Ruiz is a 6-foot lefthander with a long track record of performance. His fastball sits 89-90 mph and touches 93 and his changeup is a swing-and-miss pitch. Ruiz has some deception with a crossfire delivery and low arm slot, although that slot doesn’t allow him to throw a quality breaking ball. He has a slider he rarely uses and mostly relies on his fastball and changeup. Ruiz has fringy control. He projects as a lefthanded reliever who generates reverse splits with his fastball and changeup and has a chance to be selected on the draft’s third day.

76. Jacob Palisch, LHP, Stanford
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 190 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Palisch impressed in the Cape Cod League in 2019 but barely pitched the last two seasons for Stanford. He had labrum surgery last summer and missed the start of this season recovering before returning to pitch in the Cardinal’s bullpen. He went 2-0, 3.86 with 29 strikeouts and 11 walks in 34 innings. Palisch’s stuff has regressed since his standout summer in the Cape. His fastball sits 87-88 mph and is flat while his slider has backed up to become a slurvy pitch in the upper 70s. Palisch’s interest is derived solely from what he showed in the Cape two years ago when he reached the low 90s with a more powerful slider. Teams are open to taking a flyer on him on the draft’s third day to see if his previous stuff comes back the farther he moves away from surgery.

77. Cameron Leonard, RHP, UC San Diego
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

Leonard led remote Hemet (Calif.) High to its first CIF championship in more than 40 years, starting and winning the championship game as a sophomore. He spent his first two seasons at UC San Diego bouncing between starting and relieving, moved into the starting rotation as a junior and took over as the Friday night starter for the Tritons this spring. Leonard’s 4.70 ERA and 35 strikeouts in 74.2 innings this season weren’t inspiring, but teams see raw ingredients to work with. He stands a strong 6-foot-4, 205 pounds and has arm strength with a fastball that sits 89-91 mph and touches 93-94. Leonard’s fastball is a four-seamer but has natural two-seam movement, and he showed intriguing potential when he started throwing a two-seamer for teams in draft workouts after the season. His mid-80s slider is an average pitch when paired with a two-seamer and his changeup has a chance to be average. Leonard throws lots of strikes and draws early-count contact to pitch deep into games. Some teams think Leonard is a diamond in the rough who will take off once he drops his four-seamer and starts throwing two-seamers. He is in the mix to be taken on the draft’s third day.

78. Mason Molina, LHP, Trabuco Hills HS, Mission Viejo, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 200 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Texas Tech

Molina emerged as one of the most polished prep lefthanders in the draft class led Trabuco Hills to the CIF-Southern Section Division 2 championship game this spring, where he pitched a complete game against a loaded Thousand Oaks (Calif.) High team that featured top draft prospects Maxwell Muncy, Roc Riggio and Charlie Saum. Molina's fastball sits 87-91 mph and he backs it up with a pair of quality breaking balls. His low-80s slider gets in on righthanders quickly to tie them up and he can drop his mid-70s curveball in for strikes on both sides of the plate. Molina has a strong, durable build capable of logging innings. His present stuff is a little light, but his polish and pitch mix have teams interested. He is committed to Texas Tech.

79. Shane McGuire, C/1B, San Diego
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 195 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

The younger brother of Blue Jays catcher Reese McGuire, Shane served as San Diego’s primary catcher the last three seasons and showed promise with the bat, although his performance never quite matched expectations. He hit .278 with six home runs for the Toreros this season while catching on Fridays and Sundays and playing first base on Saturdays. McGuire shows flashes of being an average hitter with average power from the left side. He has some natural feel to hit and can drive home runs to his pull side. He primarily projects to be a doubles hitter with occasional home run pop, although he’s often underwhelmed compared to projections. McGuire is a well below-average runner with a thick lower half and is limited to catcher and first base defensively. He doesn’t do anything exceptional behind the plate, but he does everything just enough to be a potentially average defender. His footwork, receiving and arm are all average and give him a chance to stick at catcher. McGuire slimmed down to get in better shape this year and will have to maintain his body moving forward. He has a chance to be taken on the draft’s third day.

80. Connor Kokx, OF, Long Beach State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

81. Gavin Ochoa, RHP/OF, Casa Grande HS, Petaluma, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Long Beach State

82. Damon Keith, OF, California Baptist
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 195 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

83. Travis Adams, RHP, Sacramento State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 197 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

84. Kaden Moeller, LHP/1B, Damien HS, La Verne, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 185 • B-T: L-L • Commitment/Drafted: Long Beach State

85. Caleb Ricketts, C/OF, San Diego
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 205 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

86. Zac Presno, C, Fresno State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 210 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

87. Andre Granillo, RHP, UC Riverside
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-4 • Wt: 245 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

88. Cameron Magee, SS, Canyon HS, Anaheim, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 186 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Arizona State

89. Evan Yates, RHP, Martin Luther King HS, Riverside, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 180 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Cal State Fullerton

90. Chad Castillo, OF, California Baptist
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 205 • B-T: L-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

91. Josh Randall, C, Capistrano Valley Christian HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 210 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Arizona

92. Jason Brandow, OF, Cal State Fullerton
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 215 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Pirates '18 (22)

93. Bryce Grudzielanek, 3B, Torrey Pines HS, San Diego
Source: HS • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: UCLA

94. Marshall Hunt, RHP, Sacramento City JC
Source: JC • Ht: 6-3 • Wt: 200 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

95. Jalen Smith, OF, UC Davis
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-0 • Wt: 180 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

96. Konrad Bohnert, RHP, Carlsbad (Calif.) HS
Source: HS • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 180 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: San Diego State

97. Kohl Simas, RHP, San Diego State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

98. Max McGwire, 1B, Capistrano Valley HS, Mission Viejo, Calif.
Source: HS • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Oklahoma

99. Jonathan Clark, RHP, San Jose State
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-1 • Wt: 190 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: Never Drafted

100. Hunter Hargett, RHP, Point Loma HS, San Diego
Source: 4YR • Ht: 6-2 • Wt: 185 • B-T: R-R • Commitment/Drafted: San Diego State

Trent Palmer (Mike Janes Four Seam Images)

Baseball America Prospect Report—September 16, 2021

Trent Palmer throws his second no-hitter of the season, Matt McLain hits his second professional home run and more.

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