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Top 2023 College MLB Draft Prospects

Carson Montgomery Billmitchell

By Carlos Collazo

Baseball America’s 2023 college rankings are compiled in consultation with major league scouts. The list is an attempt to gauge the industry’s consensus on the talent of the draft-eligible four-year players in the country, though plenty will change between now and the 2023 draft.

With recent updates of the 2021 and 2022 classes in the rearview mirror, we now turn our eyes to the 2023 class.

Baseball America readers who followed our 2020 draft coverage will see many familiar names making up the top 50 college players in the 2023 class. The bulk of the reporting for this list comes from our previous draft reporting, and each player is displayed with their 2020 draft reports.

There have been a few tweaks in the order of these players since the draft, thanks to continued feedback from sources within the major league scouting industry. 

Checking in at No. 1 is Florida State righthander Carson Montgomery, who was the highest-rated player in the 2020 draft class to go unselected. Montgomery generated plenty of whiffs with a fastball that looks like a future plus pitch and brings a wipeout slider to the table as well. He should impact the Seminoles’ pitching staff immediately.

Following Montgomery are toolsy outfielders Dylan Crews and Chase Davis, who will bring impact talent to Louisiana State and Arizona, respectively. Crews ranked among the top 60 players in the 2020 draft class before removing himself from the draft, while Davis checked in at No. 55. Both players have a chance to develop into middle-of-the-order bats while providing solid defense in the outfield as well.

South Carolina leads all programs with four players ranked among the top 50—RHP Will Sanders, LHP Jackson Phipps, LHP Magdiel Cotto and C Alek Boychuk—while five programs have three players ranked among the top 50. Those programs are Arizona, Louisiana State, Miami, Stanford and Vanderbilt.

50 Matches
See Full List Expand Collapse All Updated on: 10/19/2020
  1. 1

    Carson Montgomery

    Florida State RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 20.9

    A 6-foot-2, 195-pound righthander committed to Florida State, Montgomery has a loud two-pitch mix featuring a fastball that’s already up to 96 mph and one of the better sliders in the prep class. Montgomery consistently showed an impressive ability to generate whiffs with both pitches, with his fastball up in the zone and his slider at the bottom and below the strike zone. His fastball sits more in the 90-93 range after he settles in, but the pitch comes out of a high three-quarters slot with good angle and features solid running life. His slider flashes plus consistently, with hard and late diving action that routinely fools hitters, though scouts mentioned that the pitch is inconsistent. Some cite a wrist wrap in the back of his arm slot that could lead to the inconsistencies of the breaking ball, which also limits his fastball command. Montgomery can lose the zone at times and his command is more scattered than teams would like from a prep arm with first-round stuff. Additionally, teams will have to project on Montgomery’s changeup, which is firm in the upper 80s with little movement, but could become a reliable third pitch with additional usage. A team that likes his chance to start long-term could take him in the back half of the first, though most of the industry might have him slightly after that range. He could be a tough sign, particularly within a shortened 2020 draft.
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  2. 2

    Dylan Crews

    Louisiana State OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Crews entered the 2020 draft cycle as one of the top hitting prospects in the prep class. As an underclassman he showed impressive power to all fields, to go with electric bat speed and a clean righthanded swing. After the first few weeks of the summer, however, Crews started to struggle, showing significant swing-and-miss and plate coverage concerns. Crews waved over breaking balls on the outer half of the zone and swung through fastballs middle and up that scouts expect the elite prep hitters to handle. At his best, Crews has shown above-average hitting ability with plus raw power, solid-average running ability and good defensive instincts in the outfield. He has a simple load and setup at the plate with some of the quickest hands in the class, and the ability to change games with a single swing. He also has above-average arm strength. Because Crews is more likely to be a corner outfielder at the next level, that puts additional pressure on his bat, and he simply didn’t hit up to the lofty expectations teams put on him over the summer. Teams are skeptical of right-right corner outfield profiles out of high school, and of the 13 players that fit that demographic who’ve gone in the first round since 2010, only two weren’t projected to be center fielders (Alex Jackson, who was drafted as an outfielder and Courtney Hawkins). Crews is committed to Louisiana State and is expected to be a difficult sign. It wouldn’t be at all surprising to see Crews make it to campus, get back to his typical self with the bat and become a first-round pick in three years.
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  3. 3

    Chase Davis

    Arizona OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 210 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    A toolsy, physical outfielder out of Northern California, Davis has a strong 6-foot-1, 210-pound frame, impressive bat speed, raw power and a big arm. Davis is the type of athlete who jumps off the field quickly in a showcase environment thanks to his tool set. He recorded a 99 mph throw from the outfield at Perfect Game’s National showcase at the start of the summer, and scouting departments voted Davis as the second-best outfield arm in the 2020 class. Additionally, he can show impressive raw power in batting practice. The Arizona commit has also shown the ability to get to his tools during games. He was particularly impressive last fall in Jupiter, where he hit a home run, two triples and a double in six games, showing solid contact and the ability to drive the ball in a game setting. Davis’ swing can get a bit long, which can hurt him, as does his ability to pick up and recognize offspeed offerings. When he stays within himself and times up pitchers, however, he does a lot of damage. Some scouts have given him 70-grade bat speed and love how long he keeps the barrel in the zone. Mechanically, he can get himself into poor positions with a deep, tight bat wrap, but when he launches for contact his bat path is direct with natural loft that helps him get to his above-average power. Defensively, Davis needs continued refinement, but he’s a solid enough runner to develop into at least an average defender in a corner with more than enough arm to fit in right field. Davis has an impressive work ethic and loves to get in the gym, as his physique suggests.
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  4. 4

    Alejandro Rosario

    Miami RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 165 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.5

    Voted by scouts as a preseason second-team All-American, Rosario has an electric right arm, which he uses to fire a fastball that gets up to the 97-98 mph range. Standing at just 6-foot-1, 165 pounds, Rosario is undersized and smaller than most of the prep pitchers in the same talent range in the 2020 class. Despite his size, he has a fairly clean delivery without a ton of effort. In addition to Rosario’s fastball, he has a split-change and a slider which have both shown above-average potential. Rosario was one of the most reliable arms with Team USA’s 18U National Team last summer, throwing 13 innings with a 1.38 ERA, nine strikeouts and two walks. Despite his pure stuff, scouts have some concerns about how everything plays. This spring, scouts noted that he wasn’t missing many bats, which is alarming considering his velocity was still up to 97. There’s not a lot of deception in Rosario’s operation, and scouts wonder how his fastball will play at the next level. They would also like to see more tilt and depth out of his slider, which dives more vertically than horizontally and can often blend into his split change. Both offspeed offerings are in the same 79-84 mph velocity range. Scouts love Rosario’s arm strength and laud his competitive makeup, but with questions about the playability of his stuff and size, teams might be prevented from taking him in a range where he would sign away from his Miami commitment. With a refined breaking ball and more whiffs against his fastball at the next level, Rosario could work himself into a no-doubt first-round talent. For now, he’s just outside that range.
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  5. 5

    Tanner Witt

    Texas 3B/RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.0

    A massive, 6-foot-6, 195-pound two-way player out of Texas, Witt has legitimate pro potential as both a hitter and a pitcher. Offensively, Witt has big power from the right side to go along with decent barrel control, but his bat speed is a tick slow and the path of his barrel can get lengthy. Evaluators believe he’s more power than pure hit tool. He is a third baseman now with plenty of arm strength for the position, but he could already be too big to stick there and might be better served in an outfield corner or at first base. Most teams seem to like his upside on the mound more than his hitting potential, though his father, Kevin, played in the big leagues and is currently a minor league hitting coach. On the mound, Witt is a projection arm with an excellent frame that can still add strength, a clean arm action and solid control. He throws a fastball in the 89-92 mph range mostly, touching a 93 or 94 here and there. His best pitch is a curveball that’s presently an above-average offering and has plus potential. It’s a 73-78 mph breaker with three-quarters shape and massive spin and depth. At the Area Code Games last summer it was in the 2,600-2,900 rpm range. In addition to a fastball/curveball combination, Witt has thrown a changeup in the mid-80s that could become an average pitch as well. Witt is committed to Texas.
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  6. 6

    Drew Bowser

    Stanford SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Bowser had a weekend to remember at the Perfect Game All-American Classic last summer. He raised the most money of any player at the event for Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, won the pregame home run derby and then earned MVP of the game with a double and a walk. Bowser is a smart, mature hitter with big raw power that some evaluators consider plus-plus. He already posts exit velocities near 100 mph and hunts for mistake pitches he can drive. Bowser is an adept offspeed hitter, but his fringy bat speed and long swing leave him vulnerable to velocity and raise concerns about his future hitting ability. He often has to cheat to get to upper-end fastballs and is prone to swinging and missing against them. A shortstop now, Bowser projects to outgrow the position but has a chance to be an above-average defender with a plus arm at third base. Bowser has a strong commitment to Stanford and will be difficult to sign.
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  7. 7

    Enrique Bradfield

    Vanderbilt OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 155 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    The best runner in the prep class, Bradfield has posted sub-6.3 60-yard dash times, which are 80-grade times, and incorporates that speed in all phases of the game. A no-doubt center fielder, Bradfield uses his blazing speed to cover huge swaths of outfield grass, getting to balls in the gap that other fielders wouldn’t dream of catching. He’s more than just a fast runner though, as Bradfield consistently shows advanced route-running ability and has an elite first-step when reading balls off the bat. All of those traits combine to give him elite defensive potential at a premium position, and he also has solid arm strength. There are more questions about the offensive side of his game. Bradfield sets up with a wide stance and has impressive bat-to-ball skills, but he has well below-average raw power and there’s little in his frame to suggest he will ever grow into average power in the future. Instead, he should be a slappy, line-drive hitter who succeeds by putting balls into the outfield gaps, bunting and using his speed to collect extra-base hits and put pressure on the defense. His dynamic speed should be an asset on the bases as well, even at a time when stealing has become less of an emphasis in the major leagues. Bradfield could be a tough sign out of a Vanderbilt commitment, but he has the athleticism and game-breaking running ability that every team covets.
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  8. 8

    Ty Floyd

    Louisiana State RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.9

    An athletic, projectable righthander out of Georgia, Floyd was a two-way player for most of his life and thought of himself as more of a hitter than pitcher until recently. Also a talented basketball player, Floyd doesn’t have a ton of innings under his belt. Because of all those factors, there are more question marks with Floyd but also reasons to think he could take big steps forward by focusing exclusively on baseball. Committed to Louisiana State, Floyd has an explosive fastball out of a quick arm, running the pitch up into the mid-90s with an impressive riding life that gets plenty of whiffs up in the zone. At East Coast Pro last summer, Floyd got 12 whiffs on the pitch in just two innings. He typically sits in the 90-93 mph range, but scouts have noted that his velocity is inconsistent from outing to outing. Similarly, his secondary offerings are inconsistent and don’t project as anything more than fringe-average, 45-grade offerings now. He has thrown a slurvy curveball in the 70-75 mph range that he doesn’t get on top of consistently but has decent spin, and has also thrown an upper-70s changeup, though his release point drops when he throws it. With a lean, 6-foot-2, 180-pound frame, it’s easy to dream of what Floyd could be with a few years of development and training under his belt but teams that want more of a finished product might be more inclined to let him get to campus.
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  9. 9

    Yohandy Morales

    Miami SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Morales is a big, physical, toolsy shortstop with big league bloodlines. His father, Andy, played in the majors and Morales likely has the same pure talent to follow in his footsteps. Morales matured physically quicker than most of his contemporaries and showed an impact righthanded bat as an underclassman. Now listed at 6-foot-4, 195 pounds, Morales still has room to fill out and add strength, but he’ll need more refinement in his game to make the most of his impressive tool set. Last summer, Morales showed an ambush approach with a strong tendency to pull the ball and he also struggled significantly with offspeed offerings, swinging and missing out of the zone at a moderate rate. Having his spring season shortened hurt Morales, as scouts were impressed with the growth he showed in his first few games. In those looks, scouts saw a better approach at the plate with a more direct swing, with fewer whiffs and much better contact ability. While the pitching competition wasn’t as consistently strong as he would see on the showcase circuit, South Florida is generally one of the better areas for high school baseball and this season is no different. Morales has plus raw power, but there are questions of how frequently he’ll be able to tap into that. Defensively, he has plus arm strength, though he lacks the foot speed and short-area quickness that teams want to see in a shortstop. He has long actions and a slow exchange at times, which will probably make him a better fit for third base. Morales could be a second- or third-round pick based on his talent upside, but if teams are concerned with the risk he comes with, he could make it to campus at Miami.
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  10. 10

    Patrick Reilly

    Vanderbilt RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Reilly popped up in the fall after a strong showing in Jupiter. He took the mound for six innings, something that’s uncommon at the event, and showed increased velocity on his fastball. His fastball went from sitting at 85-90 mph in July to 90-95 in the fall, topping out at 96, albeit in a small sample size. The increase in velocity was a result of massive gains to his body. At 6-foot-4, 200 pounds, Reilly has the feel of a power righthander and has the potential for a plus fastball if he can keep up the consistency he showed in the fall. In addition to his fastball, he throws a power curveball that has a chance to profile as a 60-grade pitch, and a changeup that is presently behind the other two pitches but could become average. Reilly has better raw stuff than Alex Santos and Jason Savacool, but the key for him is maintaining consistency in the future. A repeatable delivery and an ability to throw strikes could help Reilly continue to profile as a starter. He’s committed to Vanderbilt.
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  11. 11

    Mason Miller

    Florida Gulf Coast LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    An up-arrow prep arm before the 2020 season was shut down, Miller is a 6-foot-3, 200-pound southpaw committed to Florida Gulf Coast who has some of the best natural ability to spin a breaking ball in the entire 2020 class. Over the summer at East Coast Pro, Miller showed a 74-78 mph breaking ball with elite spin rate in the 2,800-3,000 rpm range with tremendous shape and depth. The pitch humped out of his hand early and lacked power and consistent finish at times, but showed hints of a true plus offering. He also showed a fastball in the 86-91 mph range that generated 10 whiffs over three innings at ECP, and this spring his velocity was more 88-92 and touching 93. His fastball has slight running action thanks to a lower, three-quarters slot which can also make his curveball more slurvy. Miller’s control is just average now, but scouts are excited about how well his arm works, the clean action and an athletic body that bodes well for his future development. If Miller is signable, it would be difficult to see him going outside of the third or fourth round, as there aren’t many prep lefties with his body, arm action and breaking ball potential.
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  12. 12

    Jason Savacool

    Maryland RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    Savacool is the second-best prep pitcher in the northeast region behind righthander Alex Santos. Unlike Santos, who already has three above-average pitches, Savacool’s stuff is less loud but it is solid. Savacool pitches from a low three-quarters arm slot with some length in the back of his arm action. His release point is somewhat inconsistent and needs some ironing out, but he has good deception and extension in his delivery thanks in part to a large wingspan that’s bigger than his 6-foot-1 frame would suggest. As far as his pitch arsenal goes, he leads the way with a sinking fastball that sits around 88-93 mph. His sinker is matched with a slider in the 79-81 mph range that is a future above-average offering. Savacool also throws a curveball and a changeup, but both pitches are behind his first two options. At 6-foot-1, 200 pounds, there is less projection to Savacool’s body. Savacool is committed to Maryland, where he could carve out a prominent role and further increase his draft stock in three years if a team doesn’t sign him on his future potential now.
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  13. 13

    TJ Nichols

    Arizona RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 170 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    A converted shortstop, Nichols impressed scouts last summer at the 2019 Area Code Games by showing one of the bigger fastballs of the event. He threw twice during the week and touched 96 on both occasions, sitting in the 92-95 mph range in his shorter outings. He got hit around more than you would expect with that sort of velocity and his strikes were scattered. Nichols showed an inconsistent slider in the 78-81 mph range but flashed solid bite. Nichols has plenty of refining to do, but he has impressive arm strength and a lanky, 6-foot-3, 170-pound frame that can add significantly more weight. Many scouts believe he’ll add 20-30 pounds with a chance to throw 100 mph. He has present reliever risk because of his delivery and strike-throwing concerns, but he's an athletic pitcher and could make strides in the command department as he develops. An Arizona commit, Nichols is talented enough to potentially fit into a two-way role if he makes it to campus, though his pro future is certainly on the mound.
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  14. 14

    Cole Foster

    Auburn SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 185 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Foster is an area scout favorite because he has a refined swing from both sides of the plate and the game never speeds up on him.The Auburn signee is a fringe-average runner, but he maye be able to stay at shortstop because he has an excellent internal clock, solid actions and a strong, accurate plus arm. Foster’s bat is his best asset. He consistently catches up to good velocity and rarely gets fooled. He’s a plus hitter with fringe-average power. It may be tough to convince Foster to forgo his college commitment as a third-to-fourth round pick, but if he does get to school, it won’t be a surprise if he plays his way into being an even higher pick in a few years.
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  15. 15

    Corey Collins

    Georgia C
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 210 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Collins wasn’t seen as frequently over the summer showcase circuit after dealing with injuries, but is a strong, lefthanded-hitting catcher with power potential and solid catch-and-throw ability. A 6-foot-3, 210-pound Georgia commit, Collins is likely hurt by the shortened 2020 season more than most players because scouts simply weren’t able to get as many looks as some of the other notable prep players on the summer circuit. Those who have seen Collins see a catcher with good receiving ability and average arm strength and accuracy. The bat is more of the calling card with Collins at this point, and he’s shown plenty of natural strength, good bat speed and feel for the barrel. Collins has shown a mature, all-fields approach and is a solid runner for a catcher as well. Some scouts believed Collins was a candidate to move up draft boards with a strong spring thanks to his solid all-around toolset, but he is expected to be a tough sign in general and that could make things even more difficult for clubs who are worried about their lack of evaluations.
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  16. 16

    Cam Brown

    Texas Christian RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 210 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Brown checked basically every box you’d like to see out of a prep pitcher last summer. He showed a fastball in the 90-95 mph range, a swing-and-miss slider and a mid-80s changeup—all of which projected as above-average or better offerings with good control and a strong 6-foot-3, 210-pound frame. However, things were different early in the spring before the novel coronavirus shut down the baseball season. Scouts didn’t see the same Brown. He wasn’t throwing any of his offerings with the same ease. His fastball touched 95, but fell off quickly into the upper 80s and the breaking ball backed up as well, with Brown slowing down his arm action on the pitch. Teams have started questioning his athleticism and commented that he got a bit bulkier and stiffer this spring. He got hit much more frequently than he did over the summer, and without time to find his previously above-average stuff, it’s easier to see him getting to campus at Texas Christian. His control remained above-average, but he didn’t have the bat-missing stuff he showed previously. At his best, Brown showed a plus breaking ball with sharp biting action and impressive movement, with 2,500-2,800 rpm spin rate and a plus fastball, but he’ll need to work to reach that level again.
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  17. 17

    AJ Shaver

    Florida State OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 197 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    A 6-foot-2, 197-pound outfielder committed to Florida State, Shaver impressed with his raw power and rhythm at the plate last summer at East Coast Pro. While there, he showed impressive pull side pop and an intriguing bat with above-average bat speed. Scouts continued to be impressed with Shaver early this spring and were able to see him take a jump before the coronavirus shut down the 2020 season. Shaver has an exciting package of tools, including plus running ability, above-average arm strength and raw power. He brings athleticism and strength to the table, and while Shaver still has some room to improve his offensive approach and pure hit tool, some evaluators have been excited with the steps he’s taken in that area to bet on his bat moving forward. With a chance to stick in center field at the next level, his power profiles well and some teams like him in the 3-5 round range.
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  18. 18

    Timmy Manning

    Florida LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 175 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Manning has one of the better and more consistent breaking balls in the 2020 prep class, a mid-70s bender with tremendous depth and impressive spin in the 2300-2600 rpm range. He shows tremendous feel for landing the pitch in the zone or burying it below hitters’ knees for swings-and-misses and can backdoor the pitch to righthanders as well. It’s a real hammer, with two-plane break at times and impressive 1-to-7 shape. While his curveball stacks up with most, Manning’s fastball currently sits in the 87-91 mph range, and because of that some teams are wary of signing him into pro ball right away. The pitch has solid running life at times, but it too frequently dips into the upper 80s. Manning has also shown a changeup in the 79-82 mph range that he throws with good arm speed, but the pitch is fairly straight and fringy for now. Manning is listed at 6-foot-2, 175 pounds and if he makes it to campus at Florida and adds more power to his fastball and more physicality to his frame, he could easily shoot up draft boards.
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  19. 19

    Carlos Perez

    Miami C
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 195 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.5

    Perez is one of the better catch-and-throw backstops in the country, with every scout who’s seen him praising his defensive work. A 6-foot-2, 195-pound Miami commit, Perez has gotten plus defensive evaluations thanks to impressive hands and above-average receiving and blocking ability to go along with plus arm strength. That arm has looked like a no-doubt plus arm at times, but this spring it was more in the average to above-average range. Either way, the strength is in the tank, it’s just a matter of Perez letting it loose on a consistent basis. While most scouts are confident in the defensive side of his game, there are more concerns about the quality of Perez’s hit tool. He has power potential with plenty of strength in his frame and more room to add physicality as well. He’ll show consistent contact and impact ability in batting practice with good bat speed, but there are some timing issues that have appeared in games that could limit him getting to his power. Perez had a chance to continue climbing draft boards this spring by hitting consistently and giving teams more confidence in his offensive game. If they are too scared of the bat, he could get to Miami and try and prove he’s a legit prospect on both sides, but teams are still in on him as a defender in the 3-5 round range.
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  20. 20

    Ryan Hagenow

    Kentucky RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-5 | Wt: 208 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    A projection righthander with a physical 6-foot-5, 208-pound frame, Hagenow has a lot of ingredients for scouts to like. He showed good progress from the summer into the fall with his fastball velocity, throwing an 87-90 mph heater at East Coast Pro before touching 93 later in the year at Jupiter. The pitch has some arm-side running action and he has a good feel to land it and his secondaries for strikes. The Kentucky commit also throws a slider and a changeup, both of which are more average offerings now but have shown flashes of above-average potential at times. His slider is in the 81-83 mph range with 10-to-4 movement and solid depth when he hits on it, while his changeup is in a similar velocity band with sinking action and good arm speed. He lacks any real plus tool to carry him at the moment, but he checks a lot of boxes as a long-term projection arm and could add strength and begin throwing harder in the not-too-distant future. Hagenow fits somewhere in the 3-6 round range for most teams if signable.
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  21. 21

    Jace Bohrofen

    Oklahoma OF
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 195 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    An Oklahoma signee, Bohrofren is one of the better power prospects in the high school class. He has plus raw power and an average arm with a quick release that fits in either corner outfield spot, and he can even play center in a pinch. But a team willing to draft and sign him out of high school is taking a chance that his noisy setup and leverage-based lefty power will be able to play against more advanced pitching. Few doubt Bohrofren’s ability to get to 20-25 home run power as he matures, but his bat does not stay on plane in the strike zone for very long and his bat speed is average at best, which is why a number of scouts see him as a below-average hitter—one whose pitch recognition should allow him to post solid on-base percentages. Bohrofren has a good frame and is an average runner with some twitchiness. He likely makes it to Oklahoma, although his power potential fits in the fourth round if he proves signable.
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  22. 22

    Steven Ondina

    Florida International SS
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-8 | Wt: 156 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    One of the top Puerto Rican prospects in the 2020 class, along with outfielder Mario Zabala, Ondina was a third-team member of the 2020 preseason All-Americans, as voted on by scouting directors. He was rated the third-best defensive infielder in the class as well, behind shortstops Ed Howard and Milan Tolentino. His glove work is his best attribute. He plays very low to the ground, which allows him to eat up bad hops and transfer quickly on throws. His first step is quick and he also has huge arm strength, throwing one ball 97 mph across the infield at Perfect Game’s National showcase. He’s also a solid runner who should provide enough range to stick at the position. The questions with Ondina are with his bat and his impact ability. Listed at just 5-foot-8, 156 pounds, Ondina lacks any power currently and doesn’t project to add much in the future either. He has quick hands at the plate and has shown an ability to spray low line drives into the gap. He doesn’t have the elite running ability or bat-to-ball skills that undersized recent shortstops like Xavier Edwards possessed, but teams more comfortable taking smaller players could still be intrigued enough with his defensive upside at a premium position in the 3-6 round range. Those who have more questions about his bat might prefer to let him prove his offensive chops at Florida International.
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  23. 23

    Grayson Hitt

    Alabama LHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 170 | B-T: R-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    A projectable 6-foot-3, 170-pound lefthander, Hitt was something of a helium prospect early this spring before the shortened 2020 season prevented teams from seeing him. After throwing a fastball in the 87-89 mph range last summer at East Coast Pro, Hitt’s velocity increased to the 89-93 mph range this spring. On top of that he showed an above-average curveball in the mid-to-upper-70s that has solid diving action and shape that varies. While Hitt’s control is below-average at the moment, scouts love his athleticism and the ease to his operation and believe he has plenty of room for refinement and added power thanks to his projectable frame. Also a talented wide receiver, Hitt had 1,101 receiving yards and 18 touchdowns for Houston High last fall. There was a reasonable amount of scouting heat on Hitt early this spring, so it wouldn’t be surprising to see him get taken in the top five rounds, but he has an Alabama commitment to fall back on as well.
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  24. 24

    Ryan Bruno

    Stanford LHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 185 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.5

    Bruno’s pure arm talent, handedness and athleticism could have made him a day one consideration, but given the shortened season and his previous control questions that could be a hard sell for teams. Last summer Bruno showed a lively delivery out of a 6-foot-3, 185-pound frame that had plenty of room for more weight, and slung fastballs in the 94-95 mph range at his best. However, the control of that pitch—along with his entire arsenal—was well below average and some evaluators have said that Bruno’s control questions are among the biggest in the prep class, at least among prospects in Top 300 consideration. There’s effort to his delivery, with head-whacking action in his finish and an arm that will fly out of sync frequently. He’s shown three secondaries, including a curveball in the 75-78 mph range, a slider in the low 80s and a changeup in the 81-83 mph range. All those pitches are in nascent stages, as Bruno struggles to get on top and land them consistently, and because of that scouts have had difficulty grading them with any real conviction. His control will need to improve significantly before scouts know what they are really dealing with and they weren’t able to watch him enough this spring to see if he had taken those steps. Because of that, Bruno could make it to campus at Stanford, where he’ll look to refine his game and start tapping into his lofty potential.
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  25. 25

    Will Sanders

    South Carolina RHP
    Video
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 195 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    A projection righthander with a lanky, 6-foot-6, 195-pound frame, Sanders is a pitcher who most scouts see a lot of upside with in the future but are still waiting on him to tap into it. His stuff is mostly fringe-average at best now, but scouts love the indicators he’s shown with his athleticism and a body that should add plenty of strength and muscle in a few years. His fastball sat in the 87-90 mph range for the most part last summer, and he’s run the pitch up to 92 mph at his best. He’s also shown some feel to spin a slurvy breaking ball in the 77-79 mph range that has potential to become an above-average secondary. Sanders has also shown some promise with a 78-80 mph changeup that might wind up being his best pitch, a swing-and-miss secondary he’s shown exceptional feel for at his age. While most scouts and teams are excited to see what Sanders will be in a few years, most also would prefer to let him reach campus at South Carolina, unless he was signable somewhere in the middle of day two. If he was to sign, Sanders would be a slow-mover through a minor league system as he adds the necessary physicality to his frame.
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