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Top 2023 College MLB Draft Prospects

Dylan Crews Courtesylsu 2 (1)
Dylan Crews (Courtesy LSU)

After updating our overall 2023 draft rankings Monday, we’re tweaking our class of 2023 college rankings today in order to align with those rankings.

The class is led by Louisiana State outfielder Dylan Crews and Tennessee righthander Chase Dollander, who seem like the running favorites for the top pick in the draft at the moment.

The top five is rounded out by impactful and up-the-middle hitters including Mississippi shortstop Jacob Gonzalez, Florida outfielder Wyatt Langford and Grand Canyon shortstop Jacob Wilson.

The No. 1 team in the country, LSU, leads all programs with seven players ranked on the college top 100, followed by Florida, Miami, Oklahoma State and Vanderbilt with four apiece.

See the full list below, with scouting reports for every player:

100 Matches
See Full List Expand Collapse All Updated on: 2/1/2023
  1. 1

    Dylan Crews

    Louisiana State OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 203 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Crews was a highly-regarded prospect coming out of Lake Mary (Fla.) High, though he ultimately withdrew from the 2020 draft and made his way to Louisiana State, where he immediately became one of the best players in college baseball. Crews set an LSU record with 18 home runs as a freshman, clubbed 22 more as a sophomore and produced an overall line of .356/.458/.677 in his first two seasons. Crews is powerfully-built with a strong, 6-foot, 203-pound frame that supplies him with double-plus raw power. He managed a 108 mph 90th percentile exit velocity mark in 2022 to go with a 74% contact rate. Crews has a solid eye for the strike zone, and chases out of the zone less frequently than he swings and misses overall, with most of his swing-and-miss coming against sliders and changeups. He hammers fastballs, to the tune of a .380/.488/.719 slash line and 86% contact rate in his LSU career, and is equally unfazed by velocity. Crews played right field during the 2021 season before sliding over to center as a sophomore in 2022, and can at least begin his pro career in center with above-average speed and plus arm strength. Most scouts believe he’ll profile as a power-hitting corner outfielder who will hit in the middle of a lineup. He enters the 2023 season as the favorite for the 1-1 pick and might be the best college outfield prospect since Dustin Ackley in 2009.
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  2. 2

    Chase Dollander

    Tennessee RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 192 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    Dollander was an under-the-radar prospect out of high school who began his college career at Georgia Southern, before transferring to Tennessee where he took a massive step forward in control, claimed the Friday starter role and was one of the best pitchers in the country. Dollander became the second Tennessee pitcher since Luke Hochevar in 2005 to win the SEC pitcher of the year award after he posted a 2.39 ERA over 79 innings, with a 35.3% strikeout rate. Listed at 6-foot-3, 192 pounds, Dollander has a clean, fluid delivery with a fast arm and three-quarters slot with little violence or effort. He works with a four-pitch mix, but mostly has dominated batters with his fastball/slider combination. The fastball sat 95-96 mph in 2022 and touched 99 mph at peak, with above-average carry and a shallow vertical approach angle. Those elements help the pitch play up, but his excellent command of the pitch also stands out for an amateur pitcher and he threw it for strikes 76% of the time. He used a mid-80s slider almost a quarter of the time, and it’s a plus pitch with 2,500 rpm spin and 10 inches of horizontal break. Dollander has good feel for a mid-80s changeup, and has a mid-70s curveball that rounds out his repertoire and is used more vs. lefthanded hitters. Dollander is the consensus top pitcher in the class, the best college pitching prospect since Florida lefthander AJ Puk in 2016 and has front-of-the-rotation upside.
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  3. 3

    Jacob Gonzalez

    Mississippi SS
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 200 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    Gonzalez was a top-300 prospect out of Glendora (Calif.) High in 2020 who stood out for his multi-sport athleticism and powerful lefthanded swing. He went unselected and made his way to campus at Mississippi, where he’s been the starting shortstop since he stepped on campus, helped lead the team to a 2022 College World Series championship and was also selected to Team USA’s Collegiate National Team in back-to-back years. A strong and physical, 6-foot-2, 200-pound lefthanded hitter, Gonzalez has solid power and has homered 30 times in his first two seasons with Mississippi, with most of those homers going to the pull side. Gonzalez is a patient and selective hitter who pairs a keen eye with solid pure bat-to-ball skills and walked at a 14.4% clip compared to a 10.8% strikeout rate in his first two seasons. Gonzalez started the 2022 season slowly, but even when he wasn’t hitting for average, his on-base ability provided a solid floor of production. Despite his time at shortstop with Mississippi and Team USA, some scouts think he could outgrow the position in pro ball. His above-average arm strength would fit nicely at the hot corner, but Gonzalez has reliable hands and made a number of impressive plays over the summer. It’s likely that whichever team selects him does so as a shortstop and lets him play the position until he’s forced off it. He’s perhaps the best college shortstop prospect since the 2015 class, which had both Dansby Swanson and Alex Bregman.
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  4. 4

    Wyatt Langford

    Florida OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 225 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    Some scouts were intrigued with Langford’s bat out of Trenton (Fla.) High in 2020, but ultimately he wasn’t a highly regarded prospect at the time and made his way to campus at Florida. After pinch-hitting in four games in 2021, Langford stormed college baseball as a sophomore in 2022, where he tied a Gators program record with 26 home runs, led the team in most offensive categories and slashed .356/.447/.719. The 6-foot-1, 225-pound outfielder’s game is centered on his power and hitting ability. Scouts have put 70-grade raw power on his righthanded bat, and his 2022 exit velocity numbers back that up, with a 93.9 mph average and 110.6 mph 90th percentile mark. Langford shows all-fields power in games, and in the SEC has more than handled the fastballs he’s seen, with a .413/.522/.873 line vs. the pitch. He could stand to improve his contact vs. breaking balls on the outer half, and because of that he might be a power-over-hit offensive player in pro ball. A catcher in high school, Langford did serve as Team USA’s emergency catcher in the 2022 summer, but is a prospect as an outfielder. He played left field in 2022 with Jud Fabian handling center, but after showing plus run times during the fall he could give himself a chance to start his pro career in center. Langford stacks up with the best hitters in the class and should be one of the first players selected.
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  5. 5

    Jacob Wilson

    Grand Canyon SS
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 190 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    Wilson is the son of 12-year MLB shortstop and all-star Jack Wilson, who joined Grand Canyon’s coaching staff as an assistant prior to the 2023 season. Wilson, like his father, is a talented shortstop who has been first-team All-WAC in each of his first two seasons with Grand Canyon, with a combined .339/.400/.523 slash line and a microscopic 5.4% strikeout rate. That bat-to-ball ability is the headliner of Wilson’s profile, as the 6-foot-3, 190-pound shortstop has managed a 91% contact rate in his GCU career. He almost never swings and misses generally, but it’s almost impossible to get him to wave through a fastball, and of the 92-plus mph heaters he’s seen Wilson has slashed .410/.467/.528. While Wilson doesn’t project to be a big home run hitter, he did go from four homers in 2021 to 12 in 2022 and with Team USA during the 2022 summer showed surprising pull-side pop with a wood bat. Almost all of his power goes to the pull side in games, and while he has added around 15 pounds, according to his listing at Grand Canyon, from 2022 to 2023, he doesn’t project for much more than 15 or so homers per season. Scouts have praised his defensive ability at shortstop, where he has shown middle infield actions and hands, to go with above-average arm strength. He’s a solid runner who hasn’t impacted the game much at all on the bases, but his outlier contact ability and hit tool has him solidly in the top of the first round.
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  6. 6

    Paul Skenes

    Louisiana State RHP/DH
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 235 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    Skenes put together one of the best seasons that Air Force had ever seen in 2021 as a freshman, when he hit .410/.486/.697 with 11 home runs and also posted a 2.70 ERA in 26.2 innings out of the bullpen. He followed that up with another excellent 2022 season on both sides of the ball, and announced a transfer to Louisiana State for the 2023 season. Skenes is one of the most talented two-way college prospects since Brendan McKay in 2017, and is a legitimate pro prospect as both a hitter and a pitcher. Listed at 6-foot-6, 235 pounds, Skenes is an imposing figure on the mound with an athletic delivery and lower, three-quarter slot. In 2022, Skenes pitched in the 93-94 mph range with his fastball and touched 99 mph at peak velocity, with a pair of solid secondaries in a slider and changeup. His slider parks in the mid 80s with three-quarter shape and occasional hard bite, while his changeup is a mid-to-upper-80s pitch with arm-side fading life. Scouts raved about his stuff during the fall with LSU and believe he has a chance for above-average pitches or better across the board with above-average control. Skenes has caught, played first base and played a bit of outfield as a position player, though most of his at-bats have come as a designated hitter. Offensively, he is a power-driven profile with huge raw power and the ability to drive the ball over the fence to all fields. There’s plenty of chase that comes with his power, and he has a career 21% strikeout rate with Air Force, and his size makes him unlikely to stick behind the plate. With a first base-only defensive profile most likely, it wouldn’t be surprising for most teams to prefer Skenes’ upside on the mound—where he’s one of the most talented pitchers in the class.
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  7. 7

    Brayden Taylor

    Texas Christian 3B
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 165 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    Taylor possesses one of the most keen batting eye’s in the 2023 draft class, and is a savvy hitter with plenty of contact ability and on-base skill. Taylor was an All-American as a freshman in 2021 and one of the most productive hitters in the Big 12 in 2022, and between both years has hit .319/.450/.574 with 25 home runs, 25 doubles and a 19.1% walk rate compared to a 15.8% strikeout rate. A smaller corner infielder listed at 6-foot-1, 180 pounds, there is some question about the sort of impact Taylor will have in pro ball with a wood bat, but in terms of advanced hitting approaches and confidence in hit tool quality, Taylor is near the top of the class. He has an exceptionally strong eye at the plate and rarely swings at pitches out of the zone, with just a 13% chase rate in his TCU career and a 91% in-zone contact rate. Most of his power has gone to the pull side, and his exit velocities are just modest, with limited future physical projection. Taylor has hammered fastballs, but could stand to improve his results against 92-plus mph velocity and his production vs. spin. Taylor has played all over the infield but the bulk of his innings have come at third base, and despite some playing time at shortstop during the 2022 fall, is expected to man the hot corner in 2023 once again. He’s a solid, if not flashy, defender at the position.
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  8. 8

    Enrique Bradfield

    Vanderbilt OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 160 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    Bradfield has tormented batteries with his blazing speed since his prep days with American Heritage High in Plantation, Fla., where he ranked as the No. 66 player in the 2020 class. Since getting to campus at Vanderbilt, he’s lived up to his reputation as a dynamic, disruptive speedster and lockdown center fielder who hit a combined .327/.433/.456 with 93 stolen bases. Bradfield is a throwback player in the best sense of the phrase, and will earn Juan Pierre comps thanks to his contact ability and speed-driven game. The lean, 6-foot-1, 160-pound lefthanded hitter has a level bat path that’s conducive to line drives and ground balls. He has a great understanding of the strike zone and walked more than he struck out in his first two seasons and made contact at an 85% clip. While he projects as a well below-average power hitter, going from a single home run in 2021 to eight in 2022 could indicate he’ll occasionally be a threat to sneak a ball over the fence to the pull side. As his batted ball profile indicates, he should find more success by keeping the ball low with grounders, line drives and bunts and using his wheels. He’s a legitimate 80-grade runner who expertly deploys that speed on the bases—he has a 94% success rate with a thirst to steal—and his range alone should make him a plus-plus defender despite a fringy arm. Bradfield isn’t a typical prospect, but he’s a potential Gold Glove winner and stolen base champion.
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  9. 9

    Matt Shaw

    Maryland SS
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-11 | Wt: 185 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    A highly-competitive middle infielder, Shaw started his career as the everyday second baseman for Maryland in his 2021 freshman season before sliding over to the everyday shortstop job in 2022 where he hit .290/.381/.604 with 22 home runs and 11 doubles. Following that, Shaw blitzed through the Cape Cod League with Bourne, and ranked as the No. 1 prospect after leading the league in hitting with a .360/.432/.574 line and five homers. Shaw is a shorter infielder listed at 5-foot-11, 185 pounds, but he is more than capable of putting a charge into the baseball with snappy-quick hands and more all-fields power than you might expect. Shaw starts with a closed off batting stance and features a large leg kick to get started, but that has allowed him to create all-fields power and plenty of his 2022 home runs went to the opposite field. Shaw’s approach can be a bit aggressive at times, and he’ll need to improve his ability to drive breaking balls, but over the summer he was productive vs. all pitch types outside of swinging and missing at elevated fastballs a bit too frequently. Shaw is a better base runner than his above-average pure speed would suggest, and he went 21-for-24 (87.5%) in stolen bases on the Cape. Shaw has just fringy actions and range at shortstop and could slide back to second base in pro ball without more improvement. His offensive ability makes him a first round talent, wherever he winds up defensively.
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  10. 10

    Hurston Waldrep

    Florida RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Waldrep drew some interest from Georgia area scouts out of high school in 2020, but he made it to campus at Southern Mississippi, where Waldrep first pitched out of the bullpen but transitioned to a starting role in 2022 and struck out 140 batters in just 90 innings—good for the eighth-most strikeouts of any Division I arm. Waldrep transferred to Florida following the 2022 season and also showed some of the best pure stuff in the country with Team USA over the summer. Listed at 6-foot-2, 210 pounds, Waldrep attacks hitters with electric arm speed, but plenty of violence and movement in his delivery. He uses his lower half efficiently and features drop-and-drive action as he fires to the plate, with a deep and long arm stroke that turns into an artificial, over-the-top arm slot that comes by way of significant tilt. He finishes his delivery with noticeable head whack and recoil. Waldrep gets plus carry on a fastball that sits around 95 mph and has touched 99-100, and pairs it with excellent breaking stuff. His go-to breaking ball is a mid-80s slider that has earned double-plus pitch grades and generated a 55% miss rate in 2022 and he also has a plus, 12-to-6 curveball in the low 80s. Waldrep rounds out his repertoire with a mid-80s changeup that falls off the table at times. While there’s reliever risk, given his delivery and fringy command, there’s plenty of upside here as well.
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  11. 11

    Rhett Lowder

    Wake Forest RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 200 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    While Wake Forest has become a pitching factory in recent years, Lowder became the first player in program history to be named ACC pitcher of the year after a 2022 season where he posted a 3.08 ERA in 99.1 innings, with a 25.1% strikeout rate. He followed that up with a dominant showing for Team USA’s Collegiate National Team, where he was one of just two pitchers to make multiple starts during the Honkbalweek Haarlem competition in the Netherlands. Lowder is a large and physical righthander listed at 6-foot-2, 200 pounds who works with an up-tempo windup and throws from a lower, three-quarter slot. He works with a three-pitch mix that includes a fastball in the 92-94 mph range as well as a mid-80s changeup and low-80s slider. Lowder’s fastball has solid running life and touched 97 mph in 2022, and he pounded the zone at a 73% rate with the pitch in 2022 in order to set up quality secondaries. He used his slider and changeup more than half the time and those pitches are his go-to swing-and-miss offerings. Lowder’s changeup features significant fading and diving life, which pairs well off his fastball shape and he used the pitch to generate a 39% miss rate in the 2022 season. His slider features spin rates in the 2,500 rpm range, and generated misses at a 34% rate in 2022. Lowder has a safe starter profile and is one of the best pitchers in the class.
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  12. 12

    Yohandy Morales

    Miami 3B
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 209 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.8

    Morales was a talented and toolsy high school prospect who ranked as the No. 77 overall player in the 2020 draft class. He made it to campus at Miami, where he split time as a shortstop and third baseman during his 2021 freshman season before sliding over to full-time third base duties in 2022. Between his two seasons with Miami, Morales has hit .308/.380/.594 with 29 home runs and 30 doubles. Listed at 6-foot-4, 209 pounds, Morales is a large and athletic righthanded hitter with a power-driven profile. He takes big swings from the right side and starts his swing fairly quiet in both his upper and lower halves, before starting his swing with a bit of a hand hitch and firing a lengthy swing through the zone. Morales does impressive damage on contact and has shown all-fields power, with impressive exit velocities including a 91.6 mph average in 2022. With that power comes some swing-and-miss and chase tendencies, as Morales has struck out at a 21% rate with Miami, compared to a 10% walk rate. Those strikeouts come from both swinging at pitches out of the zone and swinging and missing more generally, and at times Morales seems to struggle identifying breaking balls—which leads to getting out on his front half and swinging on pitches out of the zone. An average runner, Morales is a solid defensive third baseman with good mobility, athleticism and plus arm strength from the hot corner.
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  13. 13

    Will Sanders

    South Carolina RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-6 | Wt: 215 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.3

    A projection righthander out of high school, Sanders ranked as the No. 200 prospect on the 2020 BA 500 thanks to a lanky, 6-foot-5 frame and an upper-80s fastball that scouts expected to be much firmer in just a few years. The projection proved accurate, as Sanders packed on strength to a frame now listed at 6-foot-6, 215 pounds, and pitched with a mid-90s fastball that touched 98 mph in 2022. After splitting time as a reliever in his 2021 freshman season, Sanders was a full-time workhorse starter in 2022, when he posted a 3.43 ERA over 89.1 innings. Sanders works from a deliberate windup with a more compact arm action than you might expect given his long levers, and throws from a three-quarter slot with downhill angle thanks to a high release point. His fastball sits in the 92-94 mph range with solid carry and he uses the pitch to generate whiffs at the top of the zone, but his secondaries have all been more consistent swing-and-miss pitches for him in college. Sanders’ go-to secondary is a mid-80s changeup he used nearly 25% of the time in 2022, which dives down and out of the zone to his arm side. Scouts have critiqued Sanders’ feel to spin a breaking ball, though he’s had success with both a mid-80s slider with short-cutting movement and a low-80s curveball with more depth and three-quarter shape. Sanders has solid control, but has allowed a high rate of home runs with South Carolina.
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  14. 14

    Brock Wilken

    Wake Forest 3B
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-4 | Wt: 225 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.1

    Wilken ranked as the No. 354 prospect in the 2020 class out of high school, when scouts saw him as a power-hitting righthander who had a chance to develop 70-grade power in the future. Those evaluations were prescient, as Wilken now stands 6-foot-4, 225 pounds with 40 home runs over two seasons with Wake Forest, and some of the biggest raw power in the draft class. Wilken tied the Wake Forest freshman home run record in 2021 with 17 homers and finished second in the program’s single-season home run record book when he popped 23 in 2022. As was the case in high school, Wilken is a power-over-hit offensive profile, who is capable of doing plenty of damage in whatever park he’s playing in. He has produced standout exit velocities and managed nearly a 109 mph 90th percentile exit velocity in 2022, but that power comes with questions about his pure hitting ability. Wilken has never hit over .280 in either of his two seasons with Wake Forest and he’s struck out at a 21.4% clip compared to an 11.4% walk rate, while swinging and missing frequently against both sliders and changeups. Defensively, Wilken has some tools that could play well at the hot corner, including fine hands and one of the better infield arms in the class, which is at least a plus tool. His lateral mobility is a bit of a question, and Wilken projects to be a well below-average runner as well.
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  15. 15

    Cole Carrigg

    San Diego State SS/OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-3 | Wt: 190 | B-T: B-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    One of the most versatile players in the country, Carrigg has played all over the diamond for San Diego State, including shortstop, second base, third base, catcher, left field, center field and even a few innings on the mound. After hitting .348/.419/.486 in his first two seasons with San Diego State, Carrigg ranked as the No. 4 player in the Cape Cod League, where he continued to play all over the field with Yarmouth-Dennis, but looked excellent in center field. Listed at 6-foot-3, 190 pounds, Carrigg is still coming into his strength and has mostly been a singles and doubles switch-hitter, with modest exit velocities and raw power. While Carrigg has solid bat-to-ball skills with a contact rate at 82% with San Diego State, he needs to chase less frequently out of the zone and improve his swing decisions. Carrigg has struck out at a 13.4% rate overall with SDSU, but walked at just an 8.8% clip and he looked overly aggressive at times in the Cape Cod League as well. While there’s room for improvement offensively, Carrigg could be an impactful defender at a number of positions relatively quickly. An above-average runner, he showed impressive instincts and covered plenty of ground in the outfield in the Cape, and is praised for his defensive potential at shortstop and even catcher as well. Carrigg has super-utility potential and perhaps more power upside on the way given his projectable frame.
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  16. 16

    Maui Ahuna

    Tennessee SS
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 170 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Ahuna is a Hawaii native who comes from a strong baseball tradition and was part of a banner year for Hawaiin prep prospects in 2020. He earned an All-Big 12 honorable mention after his 2021 freshman season with Kansas and then broke out massively in 2022 by hitting .396/.479/.634 with eight home runs and 16 doubles as a sophomore. Following the season, Ahuna played with Team USA and announced he would transfer to Tennessee for his 2023 junior season. A small and lean, 6-foot-1, 170-pound shortstop, Ahuna stands out for his hitting production and slick defensive work at shortstop. Ahuna starts his swing with a big leg kick, and has excellent bat speed from the left side with a clean and uphill bat path. That whippy bat speed could translate into more power as Ahuna packs on strength to his slender frame, but currently he’s more of a singles hitter who will occasionally grab some extra bases by driving a ball into the gaps and legging out a double or triple. Ahuna has hammered 92-plus mph fastballs in his career, which should help his hitting chops translate nicely to the SEC, where he should see even more velocity. There is some swing and miss in Ahuna’s game, particularly vs. breaking balls. Scouting directors voted Ahuna the best defensive infielder in college and he excels at shortstop thanks to plus speed and quickness, impressive actions, good body control and plus arm strength.
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  17. 17

    Tanner Witt

    Texas RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-5 | Wt: 215 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21

    Witt ranked as the No. 92 prospect out of high school in the 2020 draft class and was a two-way player at the time, though scouts largely preferred his upside as a power-armed righthander. Witt did log 14 plate appearances in his freshman season with Texas, but he mostly focused on pitching out of the bullpen, where he posted a 3.16 ERA over 57 innings. A transition into the starting rotation in 2022 was cut short after just two appearances, when Witt was scratched for elbow tenderness and eventually had Tommy John surgery that ended his season just 11 innings in. Witt has a fantastic pitcher’s frame at 6-foot-5, 215 pounds and works out of an athletic and well-controlled delivery before firing towards the plate with a three-quarters slot. When healthy, Witt has shown a fastball that sits in the 92-93 mph range and touches 97. His primary secondaries have been a mid-70s, 12-to-6 hammer curveball with great depth and finish, as well as a low-80s changeup that he showed good feel for early in 2022. Witt will also throw a firmer breaking ball, a low-to-mid-80s slider, though the pitch was solidly behind his curveball when scouts last saw him. Witt showed impressive feel to establish his fastball for strikes and has been a strong strike thrower in his brief college career, though entering the 2023 season Witt doesn’t have much track record as a starter and teams will have plenty of questions about his stuff post-surgery.
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  18. 18

    Cade Kuehler

    Campbell RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 205 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.2

    After splitting time as a starter and reliever for Campbell during the 2021 season, he moved into a full-time starting role as the team’s Saturday starter behind supplemental first-rounder Thomas Harrington in 2022. Following a strong sophomore season, Kuehler was invited to Team USA, where he pitched in two relief appearances for the Collegiate National Team in the Netherlands. A 6-foot, 200-pound righthander, Kuehler features some deception and moving parts in his delivery, which includes an overhead windup, as well as a high leg kick and hip turn before attack hitters with a compact arm action and three-quarter slot that looks higher at times given the tilt in his finish. Kuehler has a deep pitch mix and threw five separate offerings in 2022. He largely pitches off a fastball/slider/curveball trio, with his heater sitting in the 93-95 mph range and touching 98, with elite induced vertical break over 21 inches. Kuehler’s go-to breaking ball is a mid-80s slider in the 2,400 rpm range that generated a 46% miss rate in 2022. He uses his low-80s curveball more often vs. lefthanded hitters, and the pitch features more top-down movement. Finally, Kuehler will also break out a low-to-mid-80s changeup and a mid-to-upper-80s cutter. Kuehler can be a bit scattered with his control overall and has posted a walk rate north of four batters per nine in his first two seasons with Campbell. If he can improve that area of his game, his fastball life and deep arsenal could intrigue teams in the first round.
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  19. 19

    Tommy Troy

    Stanford 2B
    Notes:

    Ht: 5-10 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.5

    Scouts liked Troy as a polished, steady performer coming out of high school somewhere in the 4-5 round range, but with a strong Stanford commitment he got to school and has shown pure hitting ability and defensive versatility. Troy has hit .297/.359/.532 with Stanford over two seasons, with 17 home runs and 21 doubles, while logging time at second base, third base, shortstop and left field. He played both middle infield positions for Cotuit in the Cape Cod League in 2022, where he ranked as the No. 2 prospect in the circuit after hitting .310/.386/.531. A 5-foot-10, 197-pound righthanded hitter, Troy has a compact and tight swing that’s geared for hard-hit line drives with solid bat speed. He hammers fastballs and has done almost all of his extra-base damage vs. that pitch type, with an OPS over 1.000 against fastballs in his time with Stanford, with no problems catching up to 92-plus mph velocity either. Troy has shown a tendency to be an aggressive hitter, however, and he’ll chase out of the zone frequently vs. all pitch types, with plenty of swing-and-miss tendencies vs. breaking stuff and offspeed offerings. Troy doesn’t have the sort of power typically associated with productive free swingers, so he’ll either need to add strength to a frame that’s not super projectable, or refine his offensive approach. Troy is a solid runner who should stick up the middle in some capacity, though his actions and OK arm strength make him a most-likely fit at second.
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  20. 20

    Kyle Teel

    Virginia C
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 190 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    One of the most athletic players in the 2020 draft class, Teel was a standout high school prospect who would have ranked among the top 100 players in the class had he not withdrawn from the draft at the time. After reaching campus at Virginia, Teel split time as an outfielder and catcher in his 2021 freshman season before taking over as the everyday catcher in 2022. He’s hit .305/.409/.481 with 15 home runs in two seasons with the Cavaliers, and also served as Team USA’s catcher during the summer. Listed at 6-foot-1, 190 pounds, Teel has solid bat speed from the left side and has shown all-fields power in college, with aggressive swings and plenty of moving parts in his operation. There’s a significant hand hitch in Teel’s load that gives evaluators pause and could create issues with timing and consistently getting on plane, though in general Teel has shown a solid understanding of the strike zone. He’s walked at a 12.6% rate and struck out at a 14.2% rate, and in 2022 walked more frequently than he struck out, and doesn’t expand the zone at a high rate, with solid bat-to-ball skills as well. Teel has a few carrying tools behind the plate between his athleticism and plus arm strength, but he’s been a rough receiver at times and needs to refine the finer details of catching to stick at the position. He’s a great runner for a catcher and solid-average overall in the speed department.
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  21. 21

    Jack Hurley

    Virginia Tech OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-0 | Wt: 185 | B-T: L-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Hurley was one of the more productive run scorers on Virginia Tech’s 2021 team as a freshman, but he made a significant jump forward as a hitter during his 2022 sophomore season, when he slashed .375/.452/.664 with 14 home runs and 23 doubles for one of the better offensive teams in the country. Hurley parlayed that performance into a roster spot with Team USA over the summer, and is now positioned as one of the top all-around outfield prospects in the class. Hurley has a lean 6-foot, 185-pound frame that still has room to layer on more strength, but has already shown all-fields home run power and solid exit velocities. He is an aggressive hitter with an aggressive swing, which features a deep leg kick/toe tap hybrid in his lower half and has a fair amount of head movement throughout the swing. Hurley likes to swing the bat, and does so often, frequently chasing out of the zone and whiffing at a reasonably high clip against all pitch types. He has a career 24% strikeout rate compared to a 10.4% walk rate with Virginia Tech. His approach and pure contact ability don’t indicate a future above-average hitter, but he has solid power and is a plus runner who can play all three outfield positions. Limited to left field in deference to Gavin Cross in 2022, Hurley has more than enough athleticism for the position and his plus throwing arm is an asset as well.
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  22. 22

    Juaron Watts-Brown

    Oklahoma State RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 180 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Watts-Brown was a standout, multi-sport athlete in high school who excelled at baseball, football and basketball. He began his college career at Long Beach State, but redshirted in 2021 to recover from an arm injury he sustained in football. When he returned to the mound in 2022, Watts-Brown was named a Freshman All-American and his draft stock exploded over the summer when he showed improved velocity and some of the best all-around pitching upside during the summer in the Cape Cod League. Listed at 6-foot-3, 190 pounds, Watts-Brown is a good mover on the mound with a repeatable delivery that features a longer arm stroke in the back and a three-quarter slot. His fastball ticked up from 90-91 mph in the spring to 92-93 mph over the summer, and the pitch has been up to 95 regularly. His fastball has plus vertical break, but his best bat-misser is a low-80s slider that has plus potential with hard and tight spin. Watts-Brown also throws a low-80s curveball with top-down shape and will infrequently use a low-to-mid-80s changeup that he has thrown with good arm speed. He’s been a fringy strike thrower in college with better feel for his slider than his fastball. Watts-Brown was one of the biggest up-arrow college pitching prospects of the offseason, and after transferring to Oklahoma State has a chance to solidify himself as one of the better starting pitchers in the class with a solid four-pitch mix and stuff trending in the right direction.
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  23. 23

    Jake Gelof

    Virginia 3B
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 195 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.4

    Gelof is the younger brother of former Virginia third baseman and current A’s prospect, Zack Gelof. Now following in his elder brother’s footsteps, Jake has been a productive and powerful corner infielder for the Cavaliers. His 2022 sophomore season was spectacular, as he hit .377/.477/.764 with 21 home runs, set a program record with 81 RBIs, set another program record with five multi-homer games and finished with the second-best slugging percentage in the ACC. A powerfully-built 6-foot-1, 195-pound righthanded hitter, Gelof has strength and bat speed, with a swing that features a few moving parts, including a pre-pitch bat wiggle, a leg kick and a front side that tends to open up to the pull side. Gelof does seem to be a bit of a pull-happy hitter, and most of his home run damage has gone over the left field fence, but he does have the raw power to leave a ballpark to the opposite field as well. His power comes with swing-and-miss tendencies, as Gelof has a 20.4% strikeout rate for his career with Virginia, and also struggled with strikeouts during the summer in the Cape Cod League and with Team USA’s trials roster. Gelof is a limited athlete with below-average running ability, but he has solid arm strength that could keep him at third base with more improvements. He’s a workmanlike defender at the position now who could eventually move to first base or an outfield corner depending on his defensive progress.
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  24. 24

    Teddy McGraw

    Wake Forest RHP
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-2 | Wt: 210 | B-T: R-R
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.7

    McGraw missed his senior season in high school after having Tommy John surgery, but stepped into a prominent role for Wake Forest as a freshman out of the bullpen, where his 4.42 ERA was the lowest of any freshman on the team. In 2022, McGraw moved to the starting rotation, where he posted a 4.08 ERA over 70.2 innings, but continued to struggle with shaky control. A solidly-built, 6-foot-2, 210-pound righthander, McGraw operates with a fairly simple delivery that features a full arm circle in the back, a lower, three-quarter slot and a bit of head whack in his finish. He throws a sinking fastball, which allowed him to generate a 62% groundball rate in 2022—a boon for any pitcher who calls David F. Couch Ballpark home. The fastball sits in the 93-95 mph range and has touched 98. McGraw’s go-to secondary is a low-to-mid-80s slider which features solid three-quarter shape and plenty of horizontal movement, with spin rates in the 2,800 rpm range. The pitch generated a 36% miss rate in 2022 and also drove ground balls at a 52% rate. McGraw’s third offering is a mid-80s changeup with heavy sinking action that—you guessed it—also induces plenty of ground balls. McGraw has the makings of an old school workhorse type back-end starter, but he’ll need to improve control that has been solidly below-average in order to do so.
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  25. 25

    Chase Davis

    Arizona OF
    Notes:

    Ht: 6-1 | Wt: 217 | B-T: L-L
    Commit/Drafted: Never Drafted
    Age At Draft: 21.6

    Davis was a toolshed prospect coming out of high school who boasted standout physicality and athleticism as well as plus arm strength and raw power potential. After checking in as the No. 55 prospect in the 2020 class, he was one of the highest-ranked players to make it to campus but had to wait until his 2022 sophomore season to get an everyday role. When he did, he hit well, with a .289/.414/.583 line that included 18 home runs and 13 doubles, as well as an invitation to Team USA’s trials roster following the season. With a chiseled, 6-foot-1, 219-pound frame, Davis is capable of putting a charge into the baseball and his bat speed, strength, exit velocities and all-fields power indicate a player with a chance for plus juice. To this point, Davis’ power has come with swing-and-miss questions. He has a 68% contact rate in his Arizona career and has struck out at a 24% clip, though his swing decisions and overall zone control are solid, with a 19% chase rate and 16.3% walk rate. His swing features a steep bat wrap behind his head and he also has a sizable leg kick that can disrupt his timing, especially when he is late to get his front foot down. An above-average runner, Davis probably could play center field in a pinch, but he profiles as a good defensive corner outfielder with plus arm strength that could fit nicely in right.
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