League Top 20 Prospects

Appalachian League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports

Electric stuff earns Braves' Julio Teheran the No. 1 spot




FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. Mitch Einertson, of, Greeneville (Astros)
2. Francisco Hernandez, c, Bristol (White Sox)
3. Kyle Waldrop, rhp, Elizabethton (Twins)
4. *Reid Brignac, ss, Princeton (Rays)
5. *Gio Gonzalez, lhp, Bristol (White Sox)
6. Trevor Plouffe, ss, Elizabethton (Twins)
7. Yuber Rodriguez, of, Pulaski (Blue Jays)
8. Brandon Yarbrough, c, Johnson City (Cardinals)
9. Alexander Smit, lhp, Elizabethton (Twins)
10. *Troy Patton, lhp, Greeneville (Astros)
*Has played in major leagues
BURLINGTON, N.C.—Order was restored in the Rookie-level Appalachian League when Danville dispatched Elizabethton in two games to win the title. Those two teams have tussled for supremacy in four of the past five seasons. Only Pulaski's surprise overtaking of the Braves in last year's Eastern Division playoffs broke the streak.

This year's Danville squad brimmed with talent, though No. 1 prospect Julio Teheran had matriculated to low Class A by the time the playoffs rolled around. Had he played in just a few more games, 18-year-old Panamanian catcher Christian Bethancourt (No. 1 on our Gulf Coast League Top 20) would have figured prominently in this ranking.

Two of Danville's first-year pros made a huge impact in the Appy Lague but just missed the cut. First baseman and league MVP Riaan Spanjer-Furstenburg, a 16th-round pick from Nova Southeastern (Fla.), hit .359 to win the batting title, and his strength and knowledge of the strike zone portend a bright future. Lefthander Chris Masters, an 11th-round pick from Western Carolina, led the league with 85 strikeouts in 70 innings and narrowly missed winning the ERA title at 1.42. He expertly spots an 87-92 mph fastball but needs to refine his secondary stuff.

While Danville had four players on our Appy Top 20, Elizabethton featured just one—and he departed the Twins organization before the end of the season. Shortstop Tyler Ladendorf went to the Athletics for Orlando Cabrera at the July 31 trading deadline.

Pulaski's Jharmidy DeJesus, who signed out of the Dominican for $1 million in 2007, seemed a lock for the Top 20 heading into the season. But an injured shoulder forced the 20-year-old to first base, and he batted just .249/.340/.385 while showing spotty pitch-recognition skills.

1. Julio Teheran, rhp, Danville (Braves)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 150 Age: 18 Signed: Colombia '07
Teheran's $850,000 bonus was the largest of any pitcher on the 2007 international market, and Appy League batters witnessed firsthand the explosive nature of the 18-year-old Colombian's stuff. He made his pro debut at Danville in 2008, but shoulder tendinitis capped his workload at 15 innings. Teheran made just seven starts for Danville this season before the Braves promoted him to low Class A. In his final outing, he struck out 11 Burlington batters over eight innings of two-hit ball.

Teheran's overwhelming 92-96 mph fastball sits in the mid-90s even late in games, and he already shows a plus 79-82 changeup with late tail and fade. He repeats his three-quarters slot and arm speed, making his changeup that much tougher. Peak separation between Teheran's fastball and changeup can reach an astounding 15 mph.

While Teheran's mid-70s curveball shows good depth at times, the consistency of the pitch could stand improvement. His confidence on the mound borders on cockiness, but managers were more impressed with his poise and maturity in his second season in the league. He repeats a herky-jerky, two-part arm swing that features a long, stabbing motion in back, followed by a quick motion in front, which adds deception to his delivery.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
7
7
2 1 0 2.68
44
36 17 13 2 7 39 .229
 
2. Jiovanni Mier, ss, Greeneville (Astros)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Drafted: Astros '09 (1)
The 21st overall pick in June, Mier is a classic shortstop defender who shows great instincts and maturity on the field to go with above-average range and arm strength. His quick feet and impressive technique, combined with average speed, make him a rare high school shortstop who projects to stay at the position as a pro. A need for more consistency in turning double plays and in making strong throws on routine plays were the only critiques of Mier's defensive play, but they're not long-term concerns.

A righthanded batter, Mier has the quick hands and the coordination to hit for average, though his bat slowed noticeably as the summer wore on. He'll improve offensively as he learns to use the opposite field. With knowledge of the strike zone and few other threats in the Greeneville lineup, he took his walks when pitchers worked him carefully.

Though he projects as more of a gap-to-gap hitter, he did show home run juice to left and center field. He tied for the league lead with six triples, and once he fills out, he could deliver 10-15 homers per year.

Mier models his game after Derek Jeter's, and his natural leadership skills and energy reminded observers of the Yankees captain. And despite his youth and first-year status, Mier served as a vocal leader for Greeneville. Princeton manager Jared Sandberg took note, saying, "I told him, 'You're always smiling. Don't ever stop smiling and having fun playing this game.' "
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
192 32 53 7 6 7 32 30 45 10 5 .276 .380 .484
 
3. Wilking Rodriguez, rhp, Princeton (Rays)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 160 Age: 19 Signed: Venezuela '07
A product of the Rays' renewed effort in Venezuela under director of Venezuelan operations Ronnie Blanco, Rodriguez started slowly as a pro. He spent two years in the Rookie-level Venezuelan Summer League before his ideal pitcher's build—including a powerful lower half—clean mechanics and poise paved the way for his move to the Princeton rotation this year. Though he won only once in 13 starts, his 3.21 ERA ranked ninth in the league.

Rodriguez has the arsenal to pitch near the front of a big league rotation. His quick arm generates fastballs that sit at 92-93 mph and routinely reach 95-96. He imparts good spin on the ball too, allowing him to work down in the zone with a plus 78-82 mph curveball that features late bite and tilt. His power changeup is a bit firm but shows promise.

Like most young flamethrowers, Rodriguez tends to overthrow and his command suffers as a result. At times he falls in love with his curveball, and he'll need to continue learning how and when to set it up.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13 1 6 0 3.21 56
44 24 20 5 12 52 .213
 
4. Matt Hobgood, rhp, Bluefield (Orioles)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 245 Age: 19 Drafted: Orioles '09 (1)
The fifth overall selection in the 2009 draft, he signed for $2.442 million after starring as a two-way player for Norco (Calif.) High. Hobgood debuted in the Appy League, where he reminded one league manager of Curt Schilling with his burly 6-foot-4, 245-pound build. As it did with Schilling, it may take Hobgood a while to harness his quality raw stuff.

Hobgood muscles up on his heavy fastball, which ranges from 90-95 mph, but more than one opposing manager noted his struggle to locate the pitch. The same was true with his high-70s curveball and changeup. His entire arsenal flashed plus potential, even with present erratic command.

With a mature body already, Hobgood probably throws as hard now as he ever will. His clean, repeatable mechanics do lend hope, however, that he'll iron out his command. If he does, he has the potential to be a No. 2 starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
8
1 2 0 4.73
27
32 17 14 0 8
16 .305
 
5. Gabriel Noriega, ss, Pulaski (Mariners)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 170 Age: 18 Signed: Venezuela '07
An instinctual shortstop with the tools to play the position at the highest level, the 18-year-old Noriega impressed managers in his second season in the league. For such a young player, he has an uncanny ability to slow the game down and make all the plays at shortstop. A natural athlete and average runner, he features plus range, actions and arm strength.

Signed out of Venezuela for $700,000 in 2007, Noriega was the best defender in the league. He didn't let bad at-bats affect his glovework and he led Appy shortstops with a .960 fielding percentage.

An aggressive righthanded batter with a lean frame, Noriega connected for his first four pro home runs this season—including an opposite-field shot against the Twins—but he profiles as a bat-control, gap hitter in the big leagues. As such, he'll need to cut down his swing and focus on situational aspects of hitting. He did improve his average by 73 points in his second season with Pulaski.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
206 27
64 14 2 4 26 16 60 8 6 .311 .360 .456
 
6. David Holmberg, lhp, Bristol (White Sox)
B-T: R-L Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 220 Age: 18 Drafted: White Sox '09 (2)
The sixth prep lefty taken in the 2009 draft, Holmberg went to the White Sox in the second round. Brought along slowly as a pro, he won his final two starts for Bristol because they were the first two in which he completed five innings.

Six-foot-4 and a bit soft-bodied, Holmberg has room to grow stronger and improve upon his present high-80s velocity. He sits at 86-88 mph and touches 90 from a straight overhand delivery, which aids him in getting good plane to the plate.

Quick hand speed enables Holmberg to spin quality 12-to-6 curveballs with above-average break and depth. He mixes in a plus changeup and throws an occasional slider. His secondary stuff and precocious feel for locating his pitches and for changing speeds marks him as a future mid-rotation candidate, particularly if he adds a few ticks to his fastball.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
7 2 2 0 4.73
40
40 26 21 5 18 37 .256
 
7. John Lamb, lhp, Burlington (Royals)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 195 Age: 19 Drafted: Royals '08 (5)
A fifth-round pick in 2008, Lamb signed for $165,000 days after the draft but he didn't take the mound for the Royals until this June, when he served as Burlington's Opening Day starter. He didn't pitch as a Laguna Hills (Calif.) High senior, missing the season after doctors discovered a fracture in his left elbow following a car accident in which his car was struck from behind.

Lamb looked recovered, needing just six starts before earning a promotion to the Rookie-level Pioneer League. Burlington manager Nelson Liriano praised Lamb for his confidence, poise and willingness to challenge hitters. With a physical 6-foot-3 frame, a fluid delivery and three solid pitches, he's the prototype lefthanded starting pitching prospect.

Lamb works both sides of the plate with his 88-91 mph fastball, touching 93 on occasion and mixing in a curveball and changeup that flash plus potential. He tends to rely on his fastball, a good sign for a young pitcher, but he'll learn to use his secondary offerings more as he moves up. He figures to sit in the low 90s and show more consistent tilt on his breaking ball as he matures.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
6
6 2 2 0 3.95
27
24 14 12 4 9 25 .238
 
8. Robert Stock, c, Johnson City (Cardinals)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Drafted: Cardinals '09 (2)
Stock skipped his senior year of high school to attend Southern California a year early, meaning that after three collegiate seasons he's still just 19. Many teams preferred Stock as a righthanded pitcher, especially given that he hit .262 in 465 career college at-bats, and as he showed a quality fastball and two other pitches as a Trojans junior. Nevertheless, the Cardinals made him a second-round pick and committed to him as a catcher. He wanted to stay behind the plate, and the early returns in pro ball were positive.

An intelligent player, Stock knows the strike zone and uses the whole field. His strong lefthanded swing already produces occasional plus pull power, and he can drive the ball into the left-field gap. Stock works from a standstill batting stance, so the Cardinals want him to improve the load in his swing to help him get going and provide balance and rhythm.

Reviews of Stock's defense were mixed. Some liked him as an average big league catcher, but others thought he'd fit best at first base. Stock's arm ranks as average to plus and his transfer and feet are quick, and he threw out 29 percent of basestealers. His blocking ability is less refined, but Elizabethton manager Ray Smith, who caught professionally for 10 seasons, praised Stock for his energy level and take-charge attitude behind the plate.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
149 25 48 9 2 7 24 11 28 0 1 .322 .386 .550
 
9. Cesar Puello, of, Kingsport (Mets)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
With the caveat that there are questions about his makeup, Puello's potential for five major league average tools affords him the benefit of the doubt for now. Signed by the Mets for $400,000 out of the Dominican Republic in 2007, he's a strong athlete with a solid 6-foot-2, 195-pound build and loose actions. He stole 15 bases in 20 attempts this season, and his plus speed rates as his best present tool.

Puello starts with an unconventional stance—one manager likened it to him sitting in a chair—but he has a pure, righthanded line-drive stroke. The ball comes off his bat well, and he already has natural power to left field. As he learns to use the opposite field, he'll be more effective at the plate.

An aggressive player by nature, Puello showed an undisciplined approach at the plate, and some league observers questioned his maturity. His mindset works well in right field, where Puello charges balls with abandon and likes to show off his plus arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
196 37
58 10 0 5 23 10 51 15 5 .296 .373 .423
 
10. Juri Perez, rhp, Greeneville (Astros)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 150 Age: 19 Signed: Venezuela '07
Perez doesn't necessarily look the part of a top pitching prospect—not with his 5-foot-11, 150-pound frame or his short arms. Batters quickly put to rest that misconception, as his potent fastball-changeup mix proved too much for them to handle.

Greeneville manager Rodney Linares credited Perez with having the best changeup in the league. Thrown with deceptive arm speed, it bottoms out as it reaches the plate. Batters seldom put the changeup in play, driving up Perez's pitch counts.

With a fastball that ranges from 88-93 mph and sits at 91, Perez is more than a one-trick pony. With the savvy and poise to mix his primary weapons, he needs only to refine his below-average curveball, which he resists throwing at this stage, to profile as a mid-rotation starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
15
8 3 1 0 2.79 52
43 22 16 7 19 60 .219
 
11. Trayce Thompson, of, Bristol (White Sox)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Drafted: White Sox '09 (2)
Though his average plummeted to .188 after he finished the season in an 0-for-18 skid, Thompson's athletic bloodlines were obvious. His father Mychal, a 6-foot-10 center, was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1978 NBA draft and spent 12 years in the league. The younger Thompson, a second-round pick in June, excited Appy League observers with raw physicality (he's 6-foot-3 and 195 pounds), tremendous bat speed and big-time power potential.

As evidenced by Thompson's zero home runs, four walks and 33 strikeouts, those tools didn't translate into immediate results. Scouts questioned his baseball instincts as an amateur, and he struggled to identify and hit breaking balls with his long swing.

Thompson did earn high marks for his intensity level, plus arm strength and above-average speed. In time, he could become an asset in center field.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
85 8 16 3 1 0 10 4 33 2 0 .188 .247 .247
 
12. Tyler Ladendorf, ss, Elizabethton (Twins)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 210 Age: 21 Drafted: Twins '08 (2)
Ladendorf may have been the league's best player during the three weeks he spent with Elizabethton, batting .410/.500/.721. But in two stints in the Midwest League, both before and after the Twins traded him to the Athletics for Orlando Cabrera, he hit just .232/.298/.316 over 50 games. That's a concern for a 21-year-old, second-year pro whom Minnesota popped in 2008's second round after he led national junior college hitters with a .542 average.

Ladendorf didn't miss many fastballs in the Appy League, and he showed an ability to work counts in his favor so that he could be aggressive. He trusts his hands and already shows an aptitude for using the whole field.

Muscular, with a mature body, Ladendorf is an average runner who moves well in the field. He's a consistent if not especially rangy shortstop with sure hands. His arm is average and his quick release should help him stay at shortstop.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
61 18 25 7 0 4 17 11 7 1 0 .410 .500 .721
 
13. Steve Baron, c, Pulaski (Mariners)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Drafted: Mariners (1s)
The first pick in the supplemental first round in June, Baron signed for $980,000 and gave up a Duke scholarship. He skipped over the Rookie-level Arizona League to make his pro debut in the Appy League, where he impressed with observers his outstanding defensive tools. But he also hit .179 and demonstrated that his bat will have to catch up to his glove.

Baron shut down the running game, flashing a plus-plus arm and leading Appy catchers by throwing out 54 percent of basestealers. He called his own game in high school and had no trouble running a pro pitching staff at age 18. He has soft hands, and blocks and receives the ball expertly.

The Mariners see Baron as a rhythm hitter with the strength to hit for good power for the position. A focus on defense capped his offensive ceiling in his debut, and his initial exposure to advanced secondary pitches disrupted his timing. Many scouts question whether he'll ever hit for average, but a catcher with his defensive acumen will be given time to cultivate his offensive skills.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
106 12 19 6 0 2 13 7 38 0 0 .179 .241 .292
 
14. Ty Morrison, of, Princeton (Rays)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 170 Age: 19 Drafted: Rays '08 (4)
Morrison's amateur career took him from Virginia to Hawaii and finally to Oregon. He added Princeton, W.Va., to his itinerary after signing as the Rays' fourth-round pick in August 2008. He played in 10 games in his pro debut and headed back to Princeton this year after a terrific showing in extended spring training.

Morrison's bat slowed as the season progressed into the long summer months, but at his best he flashes pull power from the left side. He profiles as a top-of-the-order hitter, so continued refinement of his already strong batting eye and bunting ability will be a priority. With broad shoulders and a 6-foot-2 frame, he has room to fill out and add strength, which he began to do this spring.

He's a fast-twitch athlete and plus runner, which translates into both above-average range in center field and excitement on the basepaths, where he stole 20 bases in 25 attempts. Morrison's arm ranks as a tick below-average.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
225 34 61 9 2 3 18 27 61 20 5 .271 .365 .369
 
15. Santos Rodriguez, lhp, Bristol (White Sox)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-5 Wt.: 185 Age: 21 Signed: Dominican Republic '06 (Braves)
The White Sox acquired Rodriguez and three other prospects when they traded Javier Vazquez to the Braves in December 2008. Though Chicago intended to try Rodriguez in the rotation, they instead assigned the 21-year-old to Bristol and kept him in a relief role, marking the third straight season in which he worked in a Rookie ball bullpen. He worked four scoreless innings with eight strikeouts at low Class A Kannapolis after the Appy season ended.

Rodriguez features a plus-plus fastball during most outings, topping out at 97 mph and sitting at 95 with late movement. The pitch features incredible plane by virtue of his 6-foot-5 height, and Appy Leaguers struggled to lift the pitch, going homerless during his 27 innings. He throws a changeup with above-average arm speed that neutralizes righthanders.

Despite his arm strength, Rodriguez still walks too many batters to rank as a surefire relief prospect, though his control improved as the season progressed. He also doesn't have a usable breaking ball at this point, as his slider doesn't consistently show enough tilt to be graded even as fringe-average.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
19
0 2 0 4 1.33
27
18 5 4 0 17 42 .189
 
16. Tyler Stovall, lhp, Danville (Braves)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 180 Age: 10 Drafted: Braves '08 (2)
Typically, a pitcher who walks a league-high 56 batters in 52 innings wouldn't merit mention on a Top 20 list. However, Stovall struck out more than a batter per inning, kept the ball on the ground and allowed only one home run all season. A second-round pick in 2008, he signed for $750,000 and then endured an uneven debut in the Gulf Coast League.

With an 89-91 mph fastball, a plus curveball and an advanced changeup, Stovall has swing-and-miss stuff and held lefthanders to a .147 average. His natural athleticism ought to aid him in working through his control issues, which will entail streamlining a max-effort delivery. At this stage, he also tends to rely too much on his curveball at the expense of fastball command.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12 3 2 0 3.12
52
36 22 18 1 56 57 .202
 
17. Mycal Jones, ss, Danville (Braves)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-10 Wt.: 165 Age: 22 Drafted: Braves '09 (4)
Jones' unconventional path to pro ball meant that he debuted as a 22-year-old despite being drafted out of junior college. After two years at North Florida (one a redshirt) and a third spent academically ineligible, Jones transferred to Miami Dade CC for the 2009 season.

Batting second and playing every day for a strong Danville club enabled Jones to lead the league with 50 runs scored. A 70 runner on the 20-80 scouting scale, he stole 19 bases in 23 attempts and tied for the league high with six triples. He also showed enough gap power to crack 28 extra-base hits, third-best in the league.

Though not overly physical (he's listed at 5-foot-10 and 165 pounds), Jones is a quick natural athlete and polished defender with solid range and hands. His arm rates as average for the position, even with a max-effort throwing motion.

A righthanded batter, Jones hit just .258 in his debut, doing little to assuage those who question how much he'll hit with wood. He exudes confidence and has a strong knowledge of the strike zone, which could lead to higher averages as he makes better contact. Those who like Jones see his ceiling as a top-of-the-order hitter who could fit at shortstop or second base.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
244 50 63 18 6 4 27 26 55 19 4 .258 .337 .430
 
18. Jonathan Meyer, 3b, Greeneville (Astros)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Drafted: Astros '09 (3s)
A shortstop and natural righthanded hitter at Simi Valley (Calif.) High, Meyer began switch-hitting prior to his senior year. After drafting him in the supplemental third round this year, the Astros shifted Meyer to third base and had him focus on batting from the right side only. He struggled in his debut, especially facing breaking balls from righties, as he tended to sell out for home runs.

A high-energy player, Meyer has the strong hands, bat speed and the gap power to hit as he moves up, though he may never be a significant home run threat. He led the league with 36 walks, displaying uncanny patience for a high school player.

On defense, Meyer has the first-step quickness and range to profile as a plus defender at third base. He touched 92 mph off the mound in high school and also spent time at catcher, so he has more than enough arm for third. He's not much of a runner but has average speed underway.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
221
27
42 9 3 3 27 36 69 1 0 .190 .301
.299
 
19. Cody Rogers, of, Princeton (Rays)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Drafted: Rays '09 (7)
A quick-twitch athlete who spent two years at Panola (Texas) JC, Rogers has the potential to have four fringe-average or better tools. He had committed to attend Texas A&M before the Rays signed him for $125,000 as a seventh-round pick in June.

Though skinny at 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, the lefthanded-hitting Rogers has strong hands and wrists that generate average power to his pull side. He has a natural feel for hitting and knows the strike zone. He bats from an open stance, which can leave him susceptible to pitches away, and his bat slowed in August.

A plus runner, Rogers stole 14 bases in 15 attempts and tied for the league lead with six triples. Though he has the range to play center field, a below-average arm may limit him to left.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
198 33 60 7 6 6 37 20 54 14 1 .303 .364 .490
 
20. Brett Oberholtzer, lhp, Danville (Braves)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 190 Age: 20 Drafted: Braves '08 (8)
An eighth-round pick in 2008, Oberholtzer saved his best Appy League start for last when he threw a complete-game five-hitter against Elizabethton in the first game of the playoff finals. He ranked fourth in the league with a 2.01 ERA, showing exquisite control by walking just six hitters and permitting only one homer in 12 starts.

Still projectable at 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds, Oberholtzer has a fastball that ranges from 86-92 mph with natural tailing life. He pitches aggressively, and his unusual, herky-jerky arm action adds deception. His curveball and changeup both rate as average, and he'll go to his secondary stuff even when behind in the count.

Oberholtzer fields his position and holds runners well, and just seven baserunners attempted to steal on him in 67 innings. Though he lacks a knockout pitch, the sum of his abilities gives him a chance to pitch at the back of a big league rotation.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12 6 2 0 2.01
67
46 17 15 1 6 56 .191