The page you are looking for does not exist or has moved

Sorry, the page you're looking for is either like Sidd Finch and does not exist, or like Josh Hamilton and has moved. Where would you like to go instead?

BaseballAmerica.com Home

The latest news from our top sections:

Majors, Minors, Stats, Draft, College, High School, International or Viewpoint

Pioneer League Chat With Alan Matthews

Moderator: Alan will begin taking your questions at 2 p.m. ET. Please limit your questions to Pioneer League players and teams.

 Q:  Bill Dictus from Madison, WI asks:
Sean Rodriguez and Brian McFall both struggled during their time at Low-A. McFall barely put the ball into play their and now he is hammering the rookie level pitching. Is their that big of a jump from rookie to low class A?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Good afternoon/morning. Welcome aboard. Let's get it started. There is a considerable difference in the depth of talent from most low Class A leagues to Rookie-leagues. However, the PL was very strong this season, hence upwards of 45 players who drew consideration for a spot in our rankings. That made the struggles of McFall and Sean Rodriguez difficult to determine. Rodriguez has exceptional skills but only average to slightly above-average tools so he is going to have periods of slumps throughout his career, like many players. McFall improved his approach when he went down. For both, they gained confidence, so the move down, while it might not have been a big change in terms of pitchers they were facing, they had improved attitudes and therefore flourished.

 Q:  Bill Dictus from Madison, WI asks:
Billy Butler came out of nowhere his senior year in high school to draw huge comparisons to big time players and got himself drafted in the first round. How is it that a player goes so unnoticed for his junior year in high school and then emerges as a first round draft pick?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Actually, Butler was ballyhooed as early as his sophomore season at Wolfson High in Jacksonville. He played alongside Matt Bush, Chris Valiaka, C.J. Bressoud, Jeff Manship and other top players with Team USA's junior national squad in the summer of 2003 and was considered the best power bat available in the draft even before the calendar turned to 2004.

 Q:  Rob from Toronto asks:
Why is Seth Smith getting no love, way down at #10? On your 2004 NCAA preseason All-American team, you pegged Smith as a top 3 outfielder and said no other college position player had Smith's upside (although he was very raw). Sure he struggled in his final year at college, but is his dominance in Rookie ball not a sign that he's finally starting to turn the corner, turning his potential into productivity?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Smith is somewhat of an enigma. He does have great upside, and we might discover that we too conservative in our rankings this season. I can't wait to see him get a full pro season under his belt, and experience in instructs this offseason and other pro tutelage could unhinge his potential. He has some holes, and he is raw, which made some of the more polished players better bets as higher picks on this year's list.

 Q:  Bill Dictus from Madison, WI asks:
We all seen how J.P Howell made collegiate hitters look sick with his nasty curveball. On a major league scout scale what does his curve grade out to. Can we expect that he can make major league hitters look like he made hitters look in college?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: He has a nasty breaking ball, indeed, It probably rates near 60 on the 20-80 scouting scale, but he had a tendency to bury it out of the strike zone too often. You see, for Howell, who pitched at a high college level at Texas, he learned early in rookie ball that the young, inexperienced hitters he was often facing would chase the breaking ball, especially behind in the count. To his defense, it's wise not to throw it in the zone and risk having it hammered, but that does not necessarily equate to good development. He needs to throw it for strikes more often and we'll see how he fares against more seasoned competition next year. Hopefully the Royals challenge him with a role in the Carolina League at Wilmington to begin, but we'll have to wait and see.

 Q:  Tom from San Francisco, CA asks:
Will Cory Dunlap give James Loney a run for his money?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Best question thus far. Dunlap and Loney are not similar players but do share one common above-average tool: hitting for average. This should be an interesting develop to watch int he coming years. Clearly, the Dodgers like Loney to develop into their everyday first baseman within the next 2 seasons. Dunlap is not as advanced defensively and Loney projects to hit for more power.

 Q:  Rich from Sikeston, MO asks:
Alan...thanks for chatting. Can you predict how quickly a 1st year player can get to the big leagues after seeing them in rookie ball? For example, how quickly could Blake DeWitt get to the majors, and how does he project? Does Andy LaRoche and the possible re-signing of Adrian Beltre slow his path to LA down, or do you see one of LaRoche or DeWitt switching positions?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: No, you really can not make the prediction and make it accurately, but it's fair to say at least 3 years and perhaps as many as 5 or 6. DeWitt has a great approach and that should help him move fast. I don't think the Dodgers will re-sign Beltre, but that is just mt personal opinion, opening the door for LaRoche and DeWitt to compete for a spot there down the road.

 Q:  Mike from Boston asks:
Knowing what you now know, if they re-held the 2004 draft today where would you pick Chris Nelson?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: I believe he went in the proper slot. I know what you're getting at, at least I have a hunch, but I don't believe he was a better pick than Bush at No. 1. Nelson was the next position player taken, albeit eight picks later at No. 9, but Bush has a chance to be a solid everyday player, despite his poor judgement off the field this summer.

 Q:  Jon from Peoria asks:
How do Sean Rodriguez and Josh Leblanc compare to the other middle infielders the Angels have in their system? Do you expect both to be at Cedar Rapids next year?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Rodriguez appears to be headed for a position change. Above all else, his best attribute is a remarkable feel for the game. He grew up around it and loves to be on the field. His knowledge combined with his tool-set and the depth the organization has created up the middle make him a candidate to move behind the plate. The Angels planned to work him out as a catcher in instructs this offseason. Interestingly, it was Toussaint, not LeBlanc, who drew most of the praise from scouts and managers while compiling this list. LeBlanc played with Toussaint at Southern and the Angles drafted him in the sixth round, whereas Toussaint went in the 13th. I don't believe LeBlanc will push older, more advanced Alberto Callaspo off second base (We believe Callaspo will move back to second base soon, after this year's trial at short).

 Q:  Elroy Buster from Richmond VA asks:
What are your thoughts on Justin Orenduff?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Like most college pitchers in their first season, he was tired. Consider that Orenduff, the Dodgers' third pick (first-round, supplemental) began workouts in January and was pitching in games by March, there's no wonder he was out of gas by the time the Pioneer League season was in full swing. His fastball touched 94 mph but most often sat around 89-90, which was down from his performances with USA Baseball's college national team last summer and @ Virginia Commonwealth. He has potential to develop into a starter in the big leagues. Let's wait and see how he throws next spring when he has time to rest.

 Q:  Mike from Boston asks:
No Tyler Pelland despite his making the All-League team? How close did he come to making the list and why did you leave him off?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Pelland did not qualify. Otherwise, he would have landed somewhere in the 6-10 range. One of the pitchers the Reds received from Boston in exchange for Scott Williamson last summer, Pelland has a nasty fastballchangeup combination. He throws a four-seem fastball and a two-seemer. The four-seamer touches 94 mph and the two-seamer has plus movement and sits near 90-91 mph. He has an excellent changeup and a developing braking ball that is picking up spin and angle. He struggled at Dayton to begin the season and was clearly ahead of hitters at this level. He's one to watch.

 Q:  Tami from Anaheim, CA asks:
How does the selection process work for the Pioneer League top 20 prospects? and Are there any other prospects who deserve to be mentioned but weren't? Thank you.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: As with all of our minor league rankings, position players must have at least one plate appearance per league game scheduled and pitcher must have at least 0.1 of an inning per league game scheduled. Relievers need to have at least 20 appearances at a short-season level like the PL. There were a number of good choices that failed to make the cut. and too many to mention here. Helena's Grant Richardson tore the league up, although he was a senior sign out of Washington State this year. I love Demetrius Banks, a lefty with Great Falls with a power, low-90s fastball and a good hook to go along with it. His teammate, Donny Lucy also drew consideration for the top 20 but barely missed the rankings. He is athletic and mobile for his size, handles the bat well and hits tape-measure shots in batting practice. Missoula's Jaen Centeno is a toolsy outfielder with a good arm and plus speed that should be watched and the Osprey boasted a pair of live arms in Don Julio and Emmanuel Duran who could develop into promising pitchers with refinement of their mechanics and secondary stuff.

 Q:  Patrick from Milwaukee, WI asks:
I know Mr. Simpson touched on this on Monday, but do you feel the Padres took the wrong prep SS with the #1 overall pick? I remember reading in BA that some teams considered Nelson to be the top player available, and after watching him play in the AFLAC game, plus his incredible spring comeback after TJ surgery, it seemed clear that he was the better player. Were the Padres duped into making a hasty decision by going for the local guy? It's one thing to not go for guys like Weaver, Drew & Neimann because of money, but it's almost like they didn't even do their homework.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: I touched on this in an earlier question along the same lines. No, I don't think the Padres made a poor pick in Bush under the circumstances and I can assure you they were aware of Chris Nelson and his tool-set. The one thing I think is prudent when voicing opinion on the Padres selection is to remember less than a week before the draft, their ownership began influencing which way they were going, and that put their scouting staff in a tough position.

 Q:  Darren from Eugene, OR asks:
Next year at this time could we be talking about Billy Butler in same way as we're talking about Ian Stewart right now?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: I don't see it. Butler is a good hitter, but his swing is unorthodox and scouts questioned his maturity. An aspect of Stewart's development that screams recognition is his good makeup and work ethic. Butler is young, so he has plenty of time to tone down his attitude and get himself in good shape, but my personal opinion is that he doesn't have the upside of an Ian Stewart and he certainly is not the player at third base Stewart is.

 Q:  Mookie from Massapequa asks:
What is Chris Nelson's upside, I have heard comparisons to BJ Upton, Is this kid that good?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Upton? Not sure I would go that far. To me, B.J. Upton is going to be a all-star year in and year out beginning here in about two seasons. Nelson has potential to be a solid everyday shortstop in the big leagues. He can flat-out hit and his arm is well above-average. The fact he rebounded from Tommy John surgery in September of 2003 and was back with his high school team taking ground balls by March speaks to his work ethic, as well.

 Q:  Sean from Irvine, CA asks:
I saw Andrew Toussaint made top 20. What's the opinion on his college teammate Josh Leblanc? Anthony Whitttington pitched pretty well in AZL, but totally fell apart after the promotion to pioneer league. What is the word on him? Any other provo pitcher worth keeping an eye on?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: I touched on LeBlanc earlier . . . Whittington is hard to figure out. This kid has a live arm and coming out of a West Virginia high school in 2003, we expected his development to be gradual. Granted, he's had just over a year in pro baseball but his lack of control is a concern. His mechanics need to be improved but once he harnesses his delivery, he could really come on strong. Bill Edwards was a bright spot for Provo, but failed to qualify for our list. He has good stuff and a projectable body.

 Q:  Fred from Pa. asks:
What kind of a name is Chukars? And who were the best Chukars to not make the list?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Ahh, the Chukars! We love the Chukars here and they are a 10-inch, stocky, ground-dwelling quail with short, rounded wings and a short, thick, red bill. Find that information on another website with baseball scouting reports alongside, we dare ya. As far as their players not to make the list, well, they were loaded this year. Another good draft by Kansas City, in my opinion and a couple guys who were considered for the list but missed the cut were Mario Lisson, a toolsy shortstop, and Matt Campbell, a supplemental first rounder this year from South Carolina who failed to meet the minimum innings pitched total.

 Q:  Ron Anderson from Phoenix asks:
No players from the Missoula Osprey (Diamondbacks affiliate) made the list. Did any come close?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: As I mentioned earlier, Jaen Centeno and righthander Don Julio were close to mkaing our list. Centeno has tremendous upside with good wheels, a live if inaccurate arm and tracks down everything in the outfield. He has some holes at the plate but is young, at 20 and in just his second season professionally. Emmanuel Duran touched 97 mph in the Pl this year and is another arm to look out for in the Diamondbacks system.

 Q:  Patrick from Milwaukee, WI asks:
Thanks as always for taking our questions. Were there any Brewer prospects that just missed the cut? It seems like it's been a long time since the Brewers weren't well represented in the Pioneer League top 20 prospect list. Where do players like Charlie Fermaint, Robbie Wooley, Steve Sollmann, Grant Richardson & Josh Brady fall? I realize the final 3 are older college guys, which definitely hurt their standing when stacked up against younger, more athletic players.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Fermaint really struggled this season after landing in the top 10 of our league prospect rankings in 2003 in the Rookie-level Arizona League. He's young, however, and turns 19 next month so we're not giving up on him. Like a lot of young players, he needs to improve his plate discipline and cut down on his strikeouts. I like Wooley a lot and he just missed the list. He touches 91 mph and really blossomed this summer with his understanding of how to pitch. His slider and changeup need a little work. Righthander Josh Baker was drafted out of Rice and certainly didn't get quite as much attention as he might have elsewhere because he was behind the Owls' big three. He has a nice arm & needs to add consistency, as he misses his spots too often. He was held to 60 or 65 pitches in each of his outings to perserve his arm. He has a good slider and challenges hitters.

 Q:  Mike from Boston asks:
J.P. Howell ate hitters alive in the top tier of college competition. Then he went to a hitters'league in the pros and ate hitters alive there. Yet he's only 18th on this list. Is he just going to be one of those guys who, because of his velocity/size, isn't going to inspire much confidence from scouts until he someday makes it to the majors and eats hitters alive at that level?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Howell could take his plus breaking ball to the big leagues and be a good fourth or fifth starter. Yes, he is generously listed at 6-foot-1 and he will always have to fight that stereotype, but more teams are shedding their disdain for smaller pitchers these days and he'll stuff will dictate how far he goes. I project him as a middle reliever, perhaps a situational lefthander down the road.

 Q:  Jon from Peoria asks:
Any chance Steve Sollmann can be a top of the order guy in the majors?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Sollman was the Brewers 10th-round pick in the 2004 draft out of Notre Dame. He is long on skills and grit but short on tools. I don't project him as an everyday big leaguer but he drew comparisons to Marcus Giles for his line-drive stroke and has great leadership qualities as well. He could overachieve his way to a reserve role as a utility player in the majors.

 Q:  David from Las Vegas, NV asks:
What is your take on the 4 Rockies prospects that made the pioneer list? Where do you think they profile in the future and where they what league will each be sent to next year? Thanks
 A: 

Alan Matthews: I can only guess at this point where these guys will begin their next minor league season. A lot will be said of their performances this fall as well as how they do next spring. It appeared Deduno was ready to jump to Tri-City this summer but the Rockies were patient with him. It's not out of the question that all three players (Deduno, Nelson, Morales) report to low Class A Asheville next season.

 Q:  mj from memphis tn asks:
i read reports earlier that B.J.Syzamski was a projected 1st rounder and there was surprise that the yankees and other teams let him slide to the 2nd round and now hes not a top 10 prospect is he legit or not do the reds have any legit prospects in the pioneer league thanks for you're time mike
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Szymanski was really limited with a quadriceps strain. He is a legitimate five-tool player who was difficult to rank in this league because of his health. He should open next season at Dayton and has impact-type player potential. He will need to refine his approach at the plate and it will be interesting to watch him develop his tools into playable baseball skills. Outside of lefty Tyler Pelland, whom we've discussed already, and Craig Tatum, who came in at No. 20 on our list, Paul Janish also is an intriguing player. He has deft skill at third base and shortstop with a superb arm. He reminds many of Astros infielder Adam Everett. Can he pitch? We could find out one day in the not-so-distant future if his bat can't catch up to his glove. He had a sub 2.50 ERA in high school and reportedly threw 93-94 mph off the mound in workouts.

 Q:  Mike from Boston asks:
If Craig Tatum couldn't hit in the Pioneer League, then what are his chances now that his career is headed toward sea-level? Is that arm of his good enough to warrant a try on the mound?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: He is well above-average defensively and that fact helped his cause greatly when we evaluated the league. His swing is long but it's not out of the question that he could hit .250 in the big leagues. While that's not going to blow you away, mix in his catching skills and the impressive way he handles staffs and you have yourself a serviceable backstop.

 Q:  Jon from Peoria asks:
What will be Brian McFall's long-term position?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Me moved from first base to the outfield this season and projects best as a left fielder. He has a good aptitude and picked things up quickly after the position switch, so I believe he'll handle left field without too much trouble. He has average speed that plays well in the outfield because he showed a good ability to read the ball off the bat.

 Q:  Eric from Fort Lauderdale asks:
I was surprised to see Elbert and Blake Johnson on the list. They both seemed to really struggle with the transition. Are we still scouting potential here? Or does the stats not really count in rookie ball?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Yes, potential is certainly a big part of these lists, especially at the lower minor league levels. We're talking about kids who are fresh out of high school with Elbert and Johnson, and a lot of the time they were facing older, four-year college hitters. We do take a look at stats, but quite honestly, in the Rookie-level PL, they are only a minor factor on determining status. Johnson and Elbert have a long way to go in terms of their development but they have live arms, good makeup, and at least one well above-average pitch already.

 Q:  NoNeckWilliams from Louisville asks:
What are your thoughts on White Sox middle infielder Adam Ricks? He put up decent numbers, but didn't make the list. Does his age work against him?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Yes, age worked against Ricks on this list. We look at a players experience relative to the league he's playing in and Ricks is a product of a major Division-I program at Miami. Personally, I prefer to see players with that level of experience spend less than a couple months at this level, and move on to a high level. That said, Ricks is was considered one of the more professional hitters at Great Falls. He's a switch-hitter, can play second, short and third and the White Sox are going to take a look at him catching in instructional league. He has good baseball instincts. He could be a Mike Lavallier type if he works out behind the plate.

 Q:  Tami from Anaheim, Ca asks:
How does the selection process work for the Leauge's top 20 prospects? And were there any players that should have been listed that weren't? Thanks
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Scroll up for the criteria needed to qualify, as I have already answered this one, but there are a number of good players we had to cut from the top 20. A couple I have not mentioned are Alcides Escobar of Great Falls. He has 6.4 speed in the 60 and could hit for power, an attractive combination. I think a converted guy, Justin Barnes with the Helena Brewers could be a guy to keep an eye on, as well. He played third base last year but was moved to the mound and throws strikes. He worked in and out with no problem, had a good rhythm in his delivery, worked quick, very confident.

 Q:  Martin P. from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
How fast do you see Chris Nelson moving thru the minors? Do you think he could be in The Show by early 2007?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: That would not be out of the realm of possibility, although he was a high school draft so he will need time to work through the typical growing pains. He's not flawless at short, either. He has a tendency to allow the ball to get a little deep in on his body without keeping his hands out in from when fielding ground balls. Be patient. He'll get there and he'll be fun to watch.

 Q:  William from Florida asks:
Just wondering where you get your information from about the players in each league. Also, have you seen the dodgers new pitching prospects and what were your thoughts? I have heard great things are to come from Elbert and Johnson.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: We interview each manager in the league, several of the pitching coaches and hitting coaches as well as pro scouts. Also, we spend a lot of time watching amateur baseball including high school baseball showcases and good college matchups across the country so we are building files on these players early on in their careers. Check out some of the earlier responses to find more on the Dodgers' PL arms. Again, Logan White (a former PL "prospect" himself) and the Dodgers had a good draft and Elbert, Johnson and Orenduff were all sent to Ogden out of the draft this year.

 Q:  Tom from East Granby, CT asks:
What do you think of Tom Collaro of Great Falls and do you expect his plate discipline to improve? If he did so, he would be an awesome young prospect, and one of the top ones at the lower levels. Also, do you think there are any sleepers in this league that were left off of the Top 20? Thanks a lot. You are THE MAN!
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Collaro has good potential as a power hitter. "He hits the ball as far as anyone I've ever seen in the minor leagues, you can't hit it much farther than this guy," one manager said. He's an average runner with a plus arm but it might take more than time to plug the holes in his swing. He was not a good two-strike hitter but did make some adjustments this season. He needs to remain patient and read pitches out of the pitchers' hand earlier and better.

 Q:  Dave Tierney from Michigan asks:
Did Ogdens Jordan Pratt get any prospect consideration despite his lackluster season? How does Scott Elbert and Blake Johnson compare to Chad Billingsley, Mike Megrew, and Chuck Tiffany. Out of those 5, who has the highest ceiling?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Not much love for Pratt. Some scouts liked his stuff but he has yet to put the whole package together after struggling in 2003 at Ogden. I believe that Billingsley has the highest ceiling. That's a loaded question and I'm short on time. I rank them: 1. Billingsley 2. Elbert 3. Tiffany 4. Megrew 5. Johnson

 Q:  Justin from Texas asks:
what position will butler be when he gets the position big leagues?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: If he gets to the big leagues, it will be as a first baseman. He could improve his body and become a servicebale first baseman but he could also wind up as a DH.

 Q:  Eric from Kansas City asks:
As a Royals fan, it is great to read that they had the most (5) prospects on this list. Their system is finally starting to get some nice depth. Many of us don't know much about Luis Cota yet, what quality of stuff does he have other than the big fastball? Who does he remind scouts of? Thanks.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Cota's best secondary offering is a hard-biting slider.

 Q:  Blake Guyer from Madison, WI asks:
In the future who projects to hit for more power, higher average; between Blake DeWitt and Billy Butler?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Butler probably has better raw power while DeWitt would project to hit for a higher average currently.

 Q:  Ron Diersing from South Bend, IN asks:
Bobby Mosby showed alot of power, but struck out alot, what does he project as? Also is Tyller Pelland project as a starter or is he better suited for relief work? Should we be concerned about his performance at Dayton?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Mosby's lone present above-average tool is hitting for power. He could improve his approach and develop into a prospect and with his power, he'll have a chance to as he advances through the minors. I wouldn't write him off anytime soon. Pelland could be a good middle-of-the-rotation starter. He has a nice compact frame, a fastball that sits between 91-94, a good breaking ball and a plus change, When he started in Dayton, he didnt have the success some people thought he would have and he seemed to let it all domino-effect on him. One bad pitch followed another and he began to doubt himself a little, I believe. Also, he was throwing across his body and he got himself on line at Billings and had much more success. He was able to hit the cross corner and he stopped cutting his curveball off.

 Q:  Eric from Kansas City asks:
Billy Butler mashed the entire season in this league. He won the RBI and batting crowns. It has also been stated that the Royals will move him to 1B for next year. If he was a firstbaseman here, would he have ranked higher on the list since his defensive shortcomings would have been less of a factor? Does Billy the Kid profile as a player who can hit 40+ homeruns while hitting .320+ or more like .290+? Thanks for these great chats!
 A: 

Alan Matthews: We've spoken a lot about Butler, who is a very intriguing player, indeed. Obviously, a player is going to have to hit for well above-average power if he is going to qualify as a prospect at first base, Butler does not have as much value if he can not play third base. While Butler has plus power potential, I am not sold he will hit for that .320 number you tossed out.

 Q:  Ben from Milwaukee asks:
How close were Josh Baker and Robert Wooley to making the list? Will any of Baker, Wooley, and Wahpepah start in high A next year?
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Baker was not as close as Wooley but both were in the next 10. I would assume they would both have a chance, especially Baker, to compete for a spot in High Desert's rotation next season but it's more likely they'll open the campaign in Beloit.

 Q:  Chad from Jackson, Miss asks:
2 Questions if you don't mind; why do the Rockies draft so many hitters and why do you think Seth Smith hit like he always has the day he signed, I wish he hit like that for Ole Miss this season but I am happy for Seth.
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Quite honestly, Colorado drafted three pitchers in the first 10 rounds this year and at least early on, it doesn't appear to have been a banner year for pitching in the draft. That would explain why they leaned toward hitters in the early rounds. Nine of their next 13 picks, from rounds 10-23, were pitchers. The simple answer for Smith is he was completely focussed on baseball once he signed with the Rockies and he was also healthy. Furthermore, he was freed from the pressures of being a high-profile college player in his draft year.

 Q:  Kirk from Los Angeles asks:
Why is the Pioneer league so "hitter friendly?" Has it always been that way. The Dodger top draft picks were just mediocre in Ogden this summer
 A: 

Alan Matthews: Be careful when evaluating players, especially at the lower level of the minors, based on stats. Many of the Pioneer League cities are in areas of high elevation, making the ball carry well.

Moderator: Thanks so much for all of your questions. Aaron Fitt will be in the chat room tomorrow to discuss the New York-Penn league.

Page Not Found - BaseballAmerica.com
The page you are looking for does not exist or has moved

Sorry, the page you're looking for is either like Sidd Finch and does not exist, or like Josh Hamilton and has moved. Where would you like to go instead?

BaseballAmerica.com Home

The latest news from our top sections:

Majors, Minors, Stats, Draft, College, High School, International or Viewpoint