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State Report: Minnesota

Jim Callis -Premium Content

The state of Minnesota hasn't had a first-round pick since Glen Perkins in 2004, but Mike Kvasnicka has a chance to end that drought this spring. Kvasnicka helped Minnesota win the Big 10 Conference regular-season and tournament titles, and he and his teammates occupy six of the top seven spots on the state prospect list.<br/>

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State Report: Virginia

Nathan Rode -Premium Content

The 2009 draft was an uncharacteristically down year for Virginia, but this year will be different. The college crop is arguably the best the state has seen in a decade, with five players in the Top 200. The high school prospects still aren't back to the caliber seen in the early 2000s.<br/>

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State Report: Georgia

John Manuel -Premium Content

This might turn out to be the best year for Georgia in draft history, which is saying something for a state that has produced seven first-rounders the last two years—eight if you count Leesburg native Buster Posey, who signed out of Florida State. The last year with similar talent is 2002, which saw a pair of first-rounders (Jeremy Hermida, Jeff Francoeur), three second-rounders (Jonathan Broxton, Brian McCann and unsigned Micah Owings) and other big leaguers such as seventh-rounder Matt Capps and unsigned juco product Nick Markakis. Multiple scouts said Georgia's high school class was the best in memory and could produce up to 20 players in the first 10 rounds of the draft, depending on signability.

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State Report: Colorado

Conor Glassey -Premium Content

The last time Colorado had two high school players drafted in the top 10 rounds was 2005. This year's class is actually a little better. In 2005, righthander Kyle Winters (Marlins) and outfielder Reid Engel (Red Sox) both went in the fifth round. Colorado's top prospect this year, Kevin Gausman, came into the year as one of the top 20 high school players in the class. Although he slid a little during an inconsistent spring, he could still go anywhere from the first to the fourth round—if he doesn't slide because of signability.

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State Report: Lower New England

Aaron Fitt -Premium Content

UConn had its best season in decades, carrying an otherwise weak crop in Connecticut and Rhode Island. The Huskies set a school record for victories and will make regionals for the first time since 1994. The team's top two pro prospects are underclassmen who are not draft-eligible (outfielder George Springer and righthander Matt Barnes), but they also have a solid group of veterans led by Mike Olt.

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State Report: Upper New England

Aaron Fitt -Premium Content

Upper New England—which includes Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont—is traditionally thin, but the talent in the region has never been shallower than it is this year. Since 2006, when the three-state area produced a pair of Top 200 talents in Jeff Locke and Garrett Olson, Upper New England has been a one-star area every year. Franklin Pierce righthander Jose Macias is the only player with a chance to be drafted in the top 15 rounds. Only Macias and Dartmouth senior lefty Robert Young are likely to sign pro contracts this year.

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State Report: New Jersey

Aaron Fitt -Premium Content

One Northeast talent evaluator put it succinctly: "It's the worst year in the history of New Jersey. It's awful." In the last decade, New Jersey has produced talent more consistently than any other state in the Northeast, and in the last five years it has produced such blue-chippers as Rick Porcello, Todd Frazier, Anthony Ranaudo, Jason Knapp and Mike Trout. This year, no prospect in the state came close to cracking the Top 200, and the usually solid prep crop is downright barren.

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State Report: Massachusetts

Aaron Fitt -Premium Content

Boston College continues to carry the banner for the Bay State, which has a pair of Top 200 talents for the second year in a row. In 2009, the Eagles produced the No. 4 overall pick in Tony Sanchez and a supplemental first-round pick in Mike Belfiore. This year, the top prospect in Massachusetts again plays for BC, but lefthander Pat Dean won't follow Sanchez and Belfiore as a first-round pick, projecting instead as a third-rounder.

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State Report: Florida

John Manuel -Premium Content

Scouts knew the top players coming into the season in Florida. They knew the state was top-heavy in the high school ranks, and the college talent turned out that way too. But the short talent list in college allowed scouts to focus on the state's high school class, which turned out to be quite deep, even with a dropoff after the top six or seven players.

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State Report: Louisiana

Jim Callis -Premium Content

It hasn't taken Paul Mainieri long to return Louisiana State to the elite of college baseball, as the Tigers make their second straight trip to Omaha in Mainieri's third season in Baton Rouge. LSU has four of the state's top six prospects, leading a deep group of college players from the state. Louisiana contributes its usual strong crop of high school players, with Tigers recruits Zack Von Rosenberg and Brody Colvin standing out as potential sandwich picks.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Ohio

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Ohio normally supplies a few intriguing high school players in the first 10 rounds, but that has not been the case for the last couple of years. The strength this year comes from the college crop, though only Ohio's Marc Krauss looks like a good bet for the first five rounds.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Oklahoma

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Per capita, Oklahoma may have the most pitching prospects in the nation this year. Lefthanders Andrew Oliver and Chad James could be first-round picks, and three more southpaws—Ashur Tolliver, Austin Kirk and Tyler Lyons—could go by the end of the fourth round. There are plenty of righthanders as well, with electric but erratic Garrett Richards making a late push toward the first round.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Illinois

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Eastern Illinois dominated the Ohio Valley Conference regular season, but stumbled in the conference tournament and got left out of NCAA regional play. The Panthers will show their strength in the draft with two of the best prospects in Illinois, including lefthander Tyler Kehrer, who should go in the first five rounds, and outfielder Brett Nommensen, the state's top position player. Pitchers are more prevalent than hitters in Illinois this spring.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Indiana

Jim Callis -Premium Content

This is shaping up as one of Indiana's strongest draft years ever. Hoosier State colleges haven't produced a first-rounder since Ball State outfielder Brad Snyder in 2003, but should have two this year in Indiana righthander Eric Arnett and Notre Dame outfielder A.J. Pollock.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Missouri

Jim Callis -Premium Content

The Show-Me State boasts two of the best righthanders in the entire draft, but where—of even if—they'll go in the first round remains uncertain. Missouri's Kyle Gibson ranked fourth on our Top 200 Prospects list before coming down with a stress fracture in his forearm. Jacob Turner is the consensus best high school righty in the nation, but he gave pro teams pause with a reported $7 million asking price.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Arkansas

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Arkansas reached the College World Series for the first time since 2004, but most of the Razorbacks' best prospects (righthander Brett Eibner, third baseman Zack Cox, first baseman Andy Wilkins, lefthander Drew Smyly) aren't eligible for the draft. Ace lefthander Dallas Keuchel is the only player in the state with a chance to go in the first five rounds, though the Hogs do boast the top three college prospects and have commitments from the three best high schoolers.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Iowa

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Junior colleges dominate the prospect landscape in Iowa. Des Moines Area CC righthanders Mitch Mormann and Patrick Cooper are the Hawkeye State's top talents, though it's Iowa Western that has made three consecutive appearances in the Junior College World Series.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Kansas

Jim Callis -Premium Content

For the first time ever, all three of the state's Division I programs (Kansas, Kansas State, Wichita State) earned NCAA regional berths. The college talent in Kansas drops off quickly, however, after righthander A.J. Morris, who pitched the Wildcats to the first regional appearance in school history. The state's strength is high school righthanders who can work in the low 90s, led by potential first-rounder Garrett Gould, Tanner Poppe and Kurt Giller.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview

State Report: Nebraska

Jim Callis -Premium Content

Nebraska's two NCAA Division I programs offer little in the way of draft talent this year. Nebraska had a losing record for the first time in 12 years as sophomore-eligible righthander Mike Nesseth's inconsistency symbolized the team's struggles. The Cornhuskers have commitments from the top two high school players, and neither should be drafted high enough to turn pro at this point.

Draft | #2009#Draft Map#Draft Preview