Texas Rangers: Top 10 Prospects Chat With Aaron Fitt

Texas Rangers: Chat




Baseball America's Top 10 Prospects lists are based on projections of a player's long-term worth after discussions with scouting and player-development personnel. All players who haven't exceeded the major league rookie standards of 130 at-bats or 50 innings pitched (without regard to service time) are eligible. Ages are as of April 1, 2009.

 Q:  JAYPERS from IL asks:
What are scouts saying about Wilfredo Boscan? Did he make the Top 30?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Hello everyone, and welcome to the Rangers chat. This was a fun list to put together this year, my fourth year doing the Rangers. It's simply amazing to see how much progress this system has made in that time.

Aaron Fitt: To give you a sneak peek at the Rangers top 30 (which will be available in the Prospect Handbook), Boscan came in at No. 11. The Rangers are very high on him, and so were scouts up in the Northwest League this year. The thing that sets him apart for me is his very advanced feel for pitching and command of his fastball, changeup and curveball. He's got very good stuff and projects to add velocity, because he's got a loose, easy arm action and a skinny frame. He's a very exciting prospect.

 Q:  Ben from Leland Grove asks:
Where does Neil Ramirez fit in within their system?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Ramirez came in around 15. His upside is among the highest in this system, with a fastball up to 96 and a chance for a devastating curveball, but there's plenty of risk with him. He needs to improve his delivery, command and feel for pitching. So even though his present stuff is more impressive than Boscan's, for instance, I don't think he's nearly as safe a bet.

 Q:  Jake from Sandusky, OH asks:
With such an overabundance of catchers in the system, which one do you think is the first to be traded, and why?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Well Gerald Laird has already been moved, as expected. The only catcher who I do not see the Rangers moving is Teagarden, whose defense and leadership behind the plate combined with his power potential make for a very nice all-around package. I wouldn't be surprised to see Max Ramirez or Saltalamacchia moved this offseason, but not both. Salty would fetch more in a trade, but the Rangers absolutely will not accept less for him than he's worth, and they shouldn't. There's nothing wrong with heading into the season with multiple quality big league catchers — eventually a team will cave to the Rangers' demands.

 Q:  Jean from Springfield asks:
How would you rate Omar Poveda's overall stuff? Can he hold his own with the arms on the list on any level?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Poveda's best pitch is his above-average changeup that he can throw in any count against righties or lefties. He has added a few ticks to his fastball, sitting in the 91-93 range now instead of the 88-91 range, and his curveball is solid-average. He's one of those quality three-pitch mix guys who projects as a solid No. 4 starter or so.

 Q:  Dustin from Frankston, Tx asks:
You know you are looking at a good system when Max Ramirez barely makes your top 10 prosepcts. Am i wrong in thinking that Max Ramirez would be the top bat in MANY organizations? Even if he doesn't stick at catcher he certainly has the bat in my opinion to stick at dh or 1st.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I think he'd be the top bat in a few systems, but most systems have one or two guys with a similar or better bat (just as an example, I also do the Nationals list, and I'd put Chris Marrero and Michael Burgess ahead of Max in terms of offensive upside, though Max is a better hitter than either of them right now). But your overall point is dead-on: Max Ramirez is very good prospect, with a Victor Martinez-type ceiling, and for him to rank 10th on this list shows you just how good this farm system is.

 Q:  Zack from Ft Worth, TX asks:
With Justin Smoak on the way could Chris Davis become an everyday 3rd baseman? In his limited time playing 3rd last year he looked pretty good.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Davis has played some third base, but he would be below-average at best there at the big league level. I think it's much, much more likely that Smoak eventually takes over at first and Davis moves to DH.

 Q:  Paul from Abilene, TX asks:
What role to you see Kasey Kiker finally settling into? I see him as a nice hard throwing lefty out of the pen? You?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Yeah, I think I'm with you, Paul. He's got the stuff to start, with three quality offerings, but his smallish frame just screams bullpen to me, especially with all the pitching depth in this system now. He can be a very valuable piece out of the pen though, far more than just a left-on-left specialist, because he's got a very good changeup, a quick arm and a fierce competitive streak.

 Q:  Jayson from New Orleans asks:
What can Rangers expect from Thomas Diamond this year after his bounce back year last season from TJ surgery? And is he possibly a future closer in the MLB?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Some Rangers officials have Diamond as high as the 15-20 range in the system, though he's closer to the back of the top 30 in our rankings. The point is, they haven't given up on Diamond. I think he's going to surprise a lot of people in 2009. My gut says he breaks into the big leagues around midseason and becomes a solid contributor, whether in the rotation or the pen. It was encouraging to see his velocity back up to 95 this year, and he's still got that excellent changeup. The only missing piece is the curveball, and if he can tighten that he'll be in business. Is he a future closer? Well, he was a good closer as a sophomore at New Orleans and has that closer makeup and physicality, so it's a possibility.

 Q:  Eric from Austin asks:
In 5 years who will be maning center field for the Rangers? Borbon or Beltre?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I'd go with Beltre, with Borbon in left. Of course, if Beltre fills out more than I expect, I could easily see him in right, with Josh Hamilton shifting to left and Borbon playing center. I think both Borbon and Beltre project as quality center fielders, but Beltre's got a chance to be really special, whereas Borbon's arm holds him back just a bit.

 Q:  Jacob from Texas asks:
Neftali Feliz - starter or closer in the bigs?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Not only a starter, but the rarest of starters: a bona fide No. 1. That kind of talent doesn't come along very often.

 Q:  Kris from Univesity of Texas! asks:
With all the talk about Teagarden, Salty, and Ramirez is it possible that Manuel Pina is the most talented catcher in the Rangers system? Thanks!
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: No. But, Pina is a very strong defensive catcher who really took a step forward with the bat this year. I think he projects as a very good defense-first backup catcher in the big leagues. If the Rangers decide to keep Salty as their catcher of the future instead of Teagarden, the defense-oriented Pina would be a nice complement.

 Q:  JAYPERS from IL asks:
What led you to put Beavan in the Closer's spot on the 2012 lineup card? Also, how close was he to the Top 10?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Mostly it was a numbers game — there's just no room for him in the projected rotation. But I also know some knowledgeable baseball people who think Beavan winds up in the pen, partly because of his questionable secondary stuff, and partly because his ability to pound the strike zone with that heavy fastball, combined with his mean streak and intimidating size, seem tailor-made for the back of the pen.

 Q:  Kyle from Middletown asks:
Do you think that Taylor Teagarden is the best option for the Rangers at catcher?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I'm very high on Saltalamacchia and still believe he'll be an average big league catcher with above-average offensive production... but yes, I would go with Teagarden. It depends what you value in a catcher, but I believe Teagarden is the kind of catcher who could have an incredibly positive impact on a pitching staff with his receiving skills, intelligence and leadership. He reminds me of Jason Varitek from that standpoint, and the Red Sox often give Varitek a great deal of credit for the success of their pitchers during their run.

 Q:  Hsu from Taiwan asks:
Where would Chris Davis have been ranked if he were eligible? Do he have .300/.380/.550 with 50 HRs ceiling? What will happen to him when Smoak is ready? Thanks for the chat.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Davis strikes out quite a bit for a .300 hitter, but then, so does Ryan Howard, and he hit .313 in 2006. I think Davis can be that kind of player. He would have ranked either No. 1 or No. 2 if he were still eligible.

 Q:  Kyle from Middletown asks:
Is Justin Smoak athletic enough to move off of first base? How does his bat compare with Yonder Alonso's?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: No, he's definitely a first baseman, there's no chance he moves elsewhere. But he can be a Gold Glove-caliber first baseman, along the lines of Mark Teixeira. Alonso is a better pure hitter, but Smoak has more power and is a switch-hitter. I love Alonso, but I would rather have Smoak. In my mind, Smoak is a can't-miss star who is destined to hit 40 homers in the big leagues while playing standout defense.

 Q:  Dylan from OKC asks:
What can you tell us about David Paisano? He is a name I am not familiar with in the Rangers system.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Paisano's defense ranks as a 65 on the 20-80 scale, and his arm is at least a 60, maybe 65. This system is loaded with excellent defensive center fielders (from Beltre and Borbon to Craig Gentry and Greg Golson), but for me Paisano is the best of the lot. He also took a step forward with the bat at Spokane this year, though I'm not convinced he'll ever hit enough to be a big league regular, which is why he did not make the top 30.

 Q:  Dave from Frisco, TX asks:
Who has a bigger upside? Derek Holland or Martin Perez?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Tough question. One scout in the Northwest League this year did say Perez's arm action and repertoire reminded him of a young Johan Santana, but it's not fair to comp anyone to Santana. I suppose if everything breaks right, he could be that kind of impact player, but I can't help but worry a bit about Perez's long-term durability due to his size. Holland throws harder and is a bit bigger, so I think he's got a little more upside. Can't go wrong either way, though.

 Q:  Greg from Oakland asks:
Do the Rangers have best system in baseball?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I believe they do, yes. Oakland's is outstanding too, but I'll take Texas.

 Q:  Jon from Peoria asks:
Where does Greg Golson rank now that he's in the Rangers system? How does he compare with Beltre and Borbon?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Golson landed in the mid-20s. He actually trumps Beltre and Borbon in athleticism (which is saying something), defense and arm strength. He's faster than Beltre and has more power than Borbon. But I just don't believe in his bat. I see Golson as a quality fourth outfielder, a stellar defensive replacement and pinch-runner who can start now and then and provide some power, but won't ever get on base enough to be a regular.

 Q:  Kyle from Middletown asks:
Do you think the Ranger's system will still be one of the (if not the) best in baseball after it graduates Andrus, Feliz, Teagarden, Ramirez and Holland to the big leagues within the next year or two? It seems like the system has really good depth at all levels.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: It's amazing that this is even open for discussion, because most elite farm systems always take a dip after graduating their top-tier guys. I do believe Texas will drop a bit in the rankings after those top guys graduate, but they've got elite prospects in the making at the lower levels, with guys like Boscan, Neil Ramirez, Wilmer Font, Joe Wieland and maybe even Robbie Ross. Those guys will jump into elite status as those other players graduate, and Texas will remain among the top few farm systems in the game, barring a series of major trades.

 Q:  Mike R. from Lockport, N.Y. asks:
Where does Cristian Santana now stand ? Position and future ?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Santana had a very disappointing year, hampered by a bad hamstring injury, but he's still got an intriguing athletic package that reminds some Rangers officials of Raul Mondesi. He's got a plus arm, power potential and some speed, and he's adjusting to life in the outfield. If he can improve against breaking balls, he could take off. Remember, he's still just 19.

 Q:  Jake from Maryland asks:
How many major league at bats do you see Max Ramirez getting this year (and at what position)?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: If he stays with the Rangers, I think he gets around 350 ABs between catcher, first base and DH. If he winds up elsewhere (Florida? San Francisco?) I think he gets 500 ABs behind the plate. But I don't know that that would be the best thing for the pitching staffs at either of those places. He's really not a very good defensive catcher.

 Q:  Dustin from Texas asks:
Who just missed the list? I would imagine players like Beavan, Hurley, and Boscan were all close although I don't see how you could take Max Ramirez off.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Congrats to Dustin for guessing 11-13 (though in the wrong order). Now I'd better stop giving away Handbook secrets so I don't wind up in Jim Callis' doghouse!

 Q:  Jon from Peoria asks:
What do you make of the year that Renny Osuna had: Just an older guy who had success in the MWL or a legit prospect?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: He's an interesting sleeper who even garnered some top 30 love from at least one Rangers official I spoke with. He projects as a utility player who can play three infield positions and handle the bat pretty well. He does a good job making consistent contact and can drive the ball to the gaps. Not a bad player, and I suspect he'll move quickly in 2009.

 Q:  Warren from Texas asks:
Where in the Top 30 would you rank Fabio Castillo? A couple of years ago the Prospect handbook said he was ready to breakout, but that does not seemed to have happened. What happened to slow his development? Thanks for the chat!
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Castillo wound up missing the top 30 this year, which is a serious drop for a guy that the Rangers believed was poised for a major breakout a year ago. He's still a prospect — he's strong as an ox with a 91-95 mph fastball — but he had a rough year. He needs to improve do a better job keeping his front side closed in his delivery, which he struggles to repeat. He's had a lot of trouble with his breaking ball, though it showed some promise in instructional league, sitting in the 82-83 range. Castillo will remain in the bullpen and could be a power reliever down the road, but he's still a long ways off. And I'm wary of guys with shaky deliveries and shaky feel for pitching.

 Q:  chuck from pittsburgh asks:
How close was Tommy Hunter to making the list?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Hunter was in the teens. He doesn't have the upside of a lot of these guys we've talked about (Boscan, N. Ramirez, etc.), but he's a very safe bet to be a innings-eating No. 4 or maybe even No. 3 starter. He's a bulldog — I love his makeup, and I believe he'll be much better in the big leagues than he was in 2008. He's working hard on improving his changeup, and his power slurve will be a plus pitch. He couldn't command the breaking ball in the majors this year, which is a big reason he struggled.

 Q:  nikpin from Dallas asks:
Where do you see the recent additions of Guillermo Moscoso & Greg Golson ranking in your top 30? And what do you make of Carlos Melo?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I already discussed Golson, and I think Moscoso will slide into the list in a similar spot. I largely dismissed Moscoso when doing the New York-Penn top 20 last year because he was very old for the league and his best pitch was an 89-90 mph fastball, so I was shocked to see the kind of season he had in 2008. His fastball has so much movement and he commands it so well that he was able to dominate in the lower minors, but I wonder if he'll have enough secondary stuff to succeed in the big leagues. I also worry about his history of shoulder troubles. Melo, to me, is the real prize of the Laird trade. Our international guru, Ben Badler, tells me Melo has a 95-96 mph fastball and a very high ceiling. You know he must — not many Dominican Summer League players are involved in trades.

 Q:  Don from Rosemont, IL asks:
Who do you like more and why: Hosmer or Smoak?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I've always been in the Smoak camp. I've spoken with scouts who didn't love Hosmer's swing, even as good of a hitter as he is, and who questioned his pitch recognition. He also isn't as good defensively as Smoak. For me, Smoak and Brian Matusz were the two can't-miss guys in this draft. There's more risk with Hosmer, and I don't really see a higher ceiling than you'd get with Smoak.

 Q:  Scott from Irving, TX asks:
Any reason given to why Blake Beavan's velocity dropped a bit last year?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Part of it had to do with his delivery. The Rangers tinkered with it some this year, trying to get him to throw more downhill and not drop his arm slot, and it took him some time to get comfortable with the adjustment. It was also a matter of building up strength to endure a full season. He added 15 pounds by the end of instructional league, and the Rangers saw him climb back into the 93-95 range during short stints this fall. Really, it was a great season for Beavan to learn how to pitch and succeed without his best stuff — the Rangers were very pleased with his development, particularly his increased maturity. Nobody in the organization is particularly worried that his velocity won't come back.

 Q:  Wes from Dallas asks:
What do you see the Rangers doing with Michael Young when Andrus is ready?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: The two (non-trade) options are either move him to third or move him to second and slide Kinsler to third. Myself, I see Young at third. One thing is certain: Andrus is the shortstop of the future, and Young will eventually have to move to accommodate him.

 Q:  Bryan from San Francisco asks:
What are the Rangers feelings on Joe Wieland? What type of ceiling does he have and how quickly do you think he'll move? Thanks!
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: The Rangers love Wieland — by this time next year, he could be in the top 10. I really believe he'll take off in 2009. He's ultra-projectable and already throws in the 90-93 range, but I suspect he'll add velocity before it's all said and done. He's a strike-thrower with an advanced feel for pitching, and his curveball projects as a second plus pitch. His feel for pitching at a young age, easy arm action and projection are similar to Martin Perez and Wilfredo Boscan. That's an impressive wave of pitching talent at the lower levels of the system.

 Q:  Travis from Austin, TX asks:
Where does Marcus Lemon rate in the Rangers system? Lemon seems to have average tools but plays above them. Thanks.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: His makeup is his best attribute — as you said, he does play above his rather modest tools. He fits as a utility player down the road, which is why it was encouraging to see him play second base and show promise there in instructs this fall.

 Q:  Joseph from Fort Worth, TX asks:
Over/Under, 7 1/2 Ranger Prospects in the BA Top 100? Thanks for the chat.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I'll take the over.

 Q:  nikpin from Dallas asks:
Beyond Andrus do you see anyone else in the system(Vallejo,Lemon,etc) projecting as a possible big league shortstop?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Besides Andrus, the only guy that I really see having a chance to be an everyday shortstop is Leury Garcia, and he's very young and very far off. But unlike Vallejo and Lemon, he's got legitimate shortstop tools, with a plus-plus arm and plus-plus speed that translates into excellent range. He has earned the nickname "Furcalito", which gives you some idea of his tools. He's also a switch-hitter with some strength in his swing. There's some talk Garcia could start 2009 in low Class A, and he could be a breakout prospect. Very interesting tool set.

 Q:  DJ from Cape Coral asks:
Whats the report on LHP Richard Bleier? Was he close to the top 30?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: He wasn't too far removed from the 30, and I dare say he would have been in most other teams' top 30s, but there is just too much depth in this system. He's got a lively 89-91 mph fastball that runs and sinks away from righthanded hitters, and his hard, slurvy breaking ball is promising, as is his changeup. Another guy that could put himself on the map in 2009.

 Q:  walter from Plano, Texas asks:
Julio Borbon Next Oddibe McDowell, Rico Carty, Gabe Kaplar, Gary Matthews, Laynce Nix or Torrie Hunter(Texas resident)
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Johnny Damon.

 Q:  walter from Plano, Texas asks:
Is Smoak a better player than Chris Davis? I am not sure what else Chris can do to prove himself defensively and at the plate. I am also sure Chris with his defensive tools and arm would be wasted as a DH.What does SMOAK bring to the table that Chris can't...besides switch hitting.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Davis has a plus arm but is not a plus defender — more like average. Smoak will be at least a plus defender, and maybe plus-plus.

 Q:  Eric from Schaumburg, IL asks:
Aaron, thanks for the chat. What are your thoughts on young arms Neil Ramirez and Wilmer Font? It's ridiculous how much talent the Rangers have beyond the Top 10!
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Already addressed Ramirez, but Font is one to keep an eye on. Some Rangers officials already regard him as one of their top 10 prospects. He's just a huge, incredibly physical righthander who ran his fastball up to the 98-100 range after finally getting healthy this year. He throws it downhill, and it will be an 80 pitch if he can improve his command of it. If he can improve his secondary stuff, Font can be a superstar.

 Q:  Phil from Chandler, AZ asks:
Is Teagarden higher rated than Max Ramirez solely on defense? Or do you see Teagarden developing more plate discipline to go along with that power.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: It's mostly defense — nobody thinks Teagarden will be a better offensive player than Max Ramirez. But don't forget, Teagarden drew 75 walks in 475 plate appearances in 2007. He's a patient hitter who will post a solid OBP even if his batting average is on the low side, and he'll give you some power. There's more than enough offense to go along with his stellar defense/intangibles.

 Q:  Joe LeCates from Easton, MD asks:
Hey Aaron, thanks for the chat! I was a bit surprised to see Golson touted as the best athlete in the system over Beltre. How close is the gap between the two?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: The gap is fairly close, Joe, but in the end the consensus went with Golson. He's a freak of an athlete — he was widely regarded as the best in his draft class. He has explosive speed and strength. The only thing stopping him from being a true five-tool star is that pesky hit tool.

 Q:  Matt from Tempe, AZ asks:
What would you make out of Smoak's performance in the AFL? Is his falling in the draft to Texas an bigger steal (over Alvarez and Alonso)?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: It was a small sample size in the AFL, but it just further backs up what we already knew — that Smoak is an advanced hitter with a serious impact bat. I can't express enough how much of a coup it was for the Rangers to get him at 11.

 Q:  OCD SS from Brooklyn asks:
Given all the rumors flying between the Rangers and Red Sox about a trade of pitching for catching, can you give us an idea of where Michael Bowden and Daniel Bard would fall on this list?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I speak only for myself and not for Jim Callis, who is our Red Sox prospects expert. But I would rank both those guys in the 8-13 range on this list. Gun to my head (and without talking to anyone about those Sox prospects), I'd put Bowden at 9 between Main and Borbon, and Bard at 12 between Boscan and Beavan.

 Q:  Joe LeCates from Easton, MD asks:
Because of his inability to draw walks, coupled with what could be 25+ HR power, does Beltre profile better as say a 3, 5, or 6 hitter as opposed to hitting his customary leadoff?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: He certainly profiles more as a middle-of-the-lineup hitter than a leadoff man. Probably a No. 5 or No. 6 hitter until he improves his selectivity.

 Q:  Hsu from Taiwan asks:
Do we have any 3B prospect whose name isn't Whittleman worth watching? what's there ceiling? Thanks for the chat.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Matt West appeared on our Northwest League top prospects list and should be worth following. He needs to improve his footwork on throws across the diamond and do a better job against breaking balls at the plate, but his ceiling is a Jeff Kent-type player at second or third. That, of course, is a long way off and far from a safe bet.

 Q:  JAYPERS from IL asks:
Could the 2010 Rangers become the next 2008 Rays?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I could see that. Right now, I see 2011 as a more likely time for the Rangers to make that kind of leap, but then again, everyone saw 2009 as a more likely time for the Rays' leap, and they were a year ahead of schedule. The same could happen with the Rangers.

 Q:  Jean from Springfield asks:
Which hitter/pitcher are TX's biggest sleepers at this time?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: I want to mention Corey Young's name. He's a lefthander out of Seton Hall who will move quickly in a relief role thanks to a lively fastball up to about 90 and a good, hard curveball. He just needs to fine-tune his fastball command, but he projects as a left-on-left reliever and maybe even a bit more. The Rangers love this guy. As for hitters, let me throw another mid-rounds college guy from the 08 drat out there: outfielder Joey Butler out of New Orleans. He's strong and athletic with a strong arm and good speed, and he has a good feel for a strike zone, which makes up for the fact that his swing isn't the prettiest in the world. The Rangers think he could be a Brandon Boggs type player, though not a switch-hitter.

 Q:  Sean from London England asks:
I know that the projected line-ups have been reduced to silliness but obviously you do not think that Chris Davis can stick at a 3rd or left field (and thus Michael Young is projected at 3rd in 2012). Davis is slotted in as the 2012 DH. Where does that leave Max Ramirez who is blocked at C, DH, and 1st? Is he destined for a trade? If so, what position is he likely to stick at.
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: You are correct, I don't see Davis as a third baseman or left fielder. If he's not at first base, I think he'll be a DH, and Smoak will be the better first baseman. I don't see Ramirez in the system down the road. I also don't see Ramirez as a true everyday catcher, more of a Ryan Garko-esque catcher/first baseman/DH type.

Aaron Fitt: I've got time for one or two more...

 Q:  Dustin from Frankston asks:
Where does Jose Vallejo fall in the rankings? I have a strong feeling he could become an average to above average major leaguer given his plus speed and defense, but feel that he may be stuck behind several rangers players and prospects (kinsler, young, andrus, duran, arias and others). Seems like an ideal trade chip to me that could net some serious returns. What are your thoughts on him?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Vallejo reminded some Cal League managers of Jose Reyes, so I guess your best-case scenario is he's that kind of explosive player. Personally, I think he's more of a speedy super-utility type, with maybe a Chone Figgins ceiling. He landed in the teens on this list.

 Q:  Ben from Leland Grove asks:
Did 2008 draft picks Robbie Ross and Tim Murphy make your top 30? Seems as though lefties aren't a rare commodity in this system. Which one ranked ahead of the other, and why?
 A: 

Aaron Fitt: Both made the top 30, in the 20s. Ross has the higher ceiling but was not overly impressive after signing — he did not show the kind of explosive stuff scouts saw from him this spring in high school. Murphy is a safer bet but doesn't have as much upside. Expect Murphy to fly through the system next year thanks to his competitiveness and quality fastball-curveball attack. He lacks a quality changeup and I see him as a reliever at the major league level, but his curveball eats up lefthanded hitters.

Aaron Fitt: OK everyone, that's all for today — thanks for all the great questions. I enjoyed chatting with you as always. Enjoy the rumor-mongering out of Vegas this week.