League Top 20 Prospects

2012 California League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports




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FIVE YEARS AGO
*1. Justin Upton, of, Visalia (Diamondbacks)
*2. Henry Sosa, rhp, San Jose Giants
*3. Chris Tillman, rhp, High Desert (Mariners)
*4. Matt Antonelli, 2b, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
*5. Justin Masterson, rhp, Lancaster (Red Sox)
*6. Carlos Triunfel, ss, High Desert (Mariners)
*7. James McDonald, rhp, Inland Empire (Dodgers)
*8. Chris Nelson, ss, Modesto (Rockies)
*9. Chris Davis, 3b, Bakersfield (Rangers)
*10. Dexter Fowler, of, Modesto (Rockies)
11. Brandon Hynick, rhp, Modesto (Rockies)
12. Wade LeBlanc, lhp, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
*13. Taylor Teagarden, c, Bakersfield (Rangers)
*14. Eric Young Jr., 2b, Modesto (Rockies)
15. Hainley Statia, ss, Rancho Cucamonga (Angels)
*16. Michael Saunders, of, High Desert (Mariners)
*17. Andrew Bailey, rhp, Stockton (Athletics)
18. Kelvin Pichardo, rhp, San Jose Giants
19. Brooks Brown, rhp, Visalia (Diamondbacks)
20. Bubba Bell, of, Lancaster (Red Sox)
Without question, Billy Hamilton was the biggest story to come out of the high Class A California League—and the entire minor leagues—this season. The Bakersfield shortstop set a professional baseball record with 155 steals, won the league MVP award and edged Lancaster outfielder George Springer for the top spot on this prospect list.

The California League lived up to its reputation as a haven for hitters, with teams scoring 5.4 runs per game, easily the highest average among full-season circuits. Position players occupy eight of the first nine spots on this list, with Rancho Cucamonga righthander Zach Lee at No. 5 the lone exception. While elite pitching prospects were few and far between, lefthanders Tony Cingrani (Bakersfield) and Nick Maronde (Inland Empire) rocketed from the Cal League to the majors in their first full pro seasons.

Rancho Cucamonga would have featured the two best pitching prospects in the league if lefthander Chris Reed had logged enough innings to qualify. Another notable Quake who made only a cameo was Cuban outfielder, who hit .327/.407/.423 in 52 at-bats after signing for $42 million.

1. Billy Hamilton, ss, Bakersfield (Reds)
Age: 21  B-T: B-R  Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 160  Drafted: Taylorsville (Miss.) HS, 2009 (2nd round).
Hamilton's off-the-scale speed allows him to steal bases almost at will, beat out plenty of infield singles and get to balls few shortstops can, but there's more to his game too. He got stronger this year and opponents weren't able to knock the bat out of his hands as they could in the past. He knows the strike zone and can drive balls into the gaps.

His arm is strong enough for shortstop, but Hamilton's hands are stiff at times and he needs to be more consistent with his arm slot and with making routine plays. His 25 errors ranked third most among Cal League shortstops despite his promotion to Double-A in July. The Reds eschewed calling him up in September to have him go to instructional league and focus on playing center field, another position where his speed can make an impact.

"He can change the game and take over the game with his speed," Visalia manager Jason Hardtke said. "He just absolutely throws a wrench into everything that you're trying to do. And he's fearless. It doesn't matter what the pitcher's time is—1.1 (seconds) or even below 1.1 to the plate—he takes off."
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
337 79 109 18 9 1 30 50 70 104 21 .323 .413 .439

2. George Springer, of, Lancaster (Astros)
Age: 22  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 200  Drafted: Connecticut, 2011 (1st round).
No Cal League player offered a more electric and complete package of tools than Springer. The 11th overall pick in the 2011 draft, he came to the league with just eight games of pro experience yet finished sixth in hitting (.316) and fifth in both on-base percentage (.398) and slugging (.557). Lancaster's notoriously hitter-friendly Clear Channel Stadium boosted his numbers—he posted a 1.044 OPS there—but his tremendous bat speed and above-average power were evident.

Springer struck out 131 times in 106 games with Lancaster, showing a tendency to pull off balls and not dial back his approach with two strikes, though the quality of his at-bats improved over the course of the season. Managers rated him the league's best defensive outfielder, as he has athleticism to spare combined with the instincts and first-step quickness to play center field at a high level. His speed and arm are both plus tools.

"He can do everything on the field," Lake Elsinore manager Shawn Wooten said. "He's fast. He can hit for power. He has all the things you look for in an outfielder."
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
433 101 137 18 10 22 82 56 131 28 6 .316 .398 .557

3. Joc Pederson, of, Rancho Cucamonga (Dodgers)
Age: 20  B-T: L-L  Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 185  Drafted: Palo Alto (Calif.) HS, 2010 (11th round).
Pederson jumped from the Rookie-level Pioneer League in 2011 to Rancho Cucamonga and got stronger as the season wore on. He produced 16 homers, 18 steals and a 1.005 OPS in the second half with a swing that reminded one manager of Fred Lynn's. Pederson keeps his hands back and does a good job of putting backspin on the ball, helping his fringy raw power play up.

The son of former big leaguer Stu Pederson, Joc impressed managers with his polished approach despite his youth and his grinder mentality. He can turn on inside fastballs or shoot line drives into either gap. As Wooten put it, "He just looks like a hitter."

While Pederson has decent speed and isn't a burner, he's an effective center fielder thanks to his instincts. He has the arm strength to play on a corner, though he had a harder time tracking balls and taking proper angles when he played left field at Rancho Cucamonga. He also can improve his reads and jumps when stealing bases.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
434 96 136 26 4 18 70 51 81 26 14 .313 .396 .516

4. Kaleb Cowart, 3b, Inland Empire (Angels)
Age: 20  B-T: B-R  Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 195  Drafted: Cook HS, Adel, Ga., 2010 (1st round).
Cowart earned a promotion to Inland Empire after an all-star first-half in the low Class A Midwest League. He held his own with the 66ers, though he wore down in August in his first attempt at playing a full minor league season. While he sometimes struggled to cover outside fastballs late in the year, he has strong hands and showed a feel for driving balls to the opposite field when he was going well.

"I think you're going to see good power as he gets older," Inland Empire manager Bill Haselman said. "He already has it, but he'll probably utilize it more as he gets a little bit older. He's definitely a 20-plus home run guy in the big leagues."

Cowart has an advanced approach at the plate for his age, as his 45 walks in 69 games ranked fourth in the league during that span. Though a below-average runner, he plays an impressive third base, showing good hands and a strong arm.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
263 48 68 15 4 7 49 45 67 5 3 .259 .366 .426

5. Zach Lee, rhp, Rancho Cucamonga (Dodgers)
Age: 20  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 190  Drafted: McKinney (Texas) HS, 2010 (1st round).
His numbers might not jump off the page or seem worthy of the $5 million bonus he received in 2010, but Lee boasts  a deep repertoire and plenty of polish for his age. He fared well as the youngest pitcher to make at least 10 starts in the Cal League this year, even without a truly dominant pitch.

Lee hits his spots well, starting with his fastball that jumps on hitters at 89-92 mph and can reach 94. He can give his heater some cutting action and mix in a sinking two-seamer. Both his curveball and slider rate about average, with his slider a tighter pitch and operating at 81-84 mph. He also features a sinking changeup at 82-83 mph.

A highly rated quarterback recruit who was attending football practice at Louisiana State when he signed, Lee earns high marks for how he competes and attacks hitters. He has averaged just 2.5 walks per nine innings and posted a 3-1 K-BB ratio in two years as a pro.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
2 3 4.55 12 12 0 55 60 31 28 9 10 52 .265

6. Rymer Liriano, of, Lake Elsinore Padres
Age: 21  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 210  Signed: Dominican Republic '07.
The Padres gave Liriano a crack at the Cal League in 2011, but he hit just .127 in 15 games before getting demoted and winning the Midwest League MVP award. He started slowly again this year before hitting .338/.396/.493 in May and June and earned a promotion. Added patience was the key to him unlocking his considerable physical tools.

By improving his selectivity and maintaining an up-the-middle approach, Liriano worked deeper counts and showed potential 25-homer power to all parts of the ballpark. A 55 runner on the 20-80 scouting scale, he stole 32 bases between his two stops this year after swiping 66 in 2011, and that total likely will keep falling a bit as he continues to mature physically. He's a solid defender in right field who gets good jumps and has a strong arm.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
282 41 84 22 2 5 41 21 69 22 7 .298 .360 .443

7. Miles Head, 3b, Stockton (Athletics)
Age: 21  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 215  Drafted: Whitewater HS, Fayetteville, Ga., 2009 (26th round).
The Cal League's toughest out during the first half, Head led the circuit in all three slash categories when he was promoted to Double-A in June. He consistently puts together quality at-bats, not chasing bad balls and barreling up pitches in all parts of the strike zone with a short, compact swing. He doesn't have as much raw power as some of the other hitters on this list, but it's enough for him to profile on a corner.

"He's a hitter," Bakersfield manager Ken Griffey Sr. said. "He'll hit probably 20, 25, 30 home runs. He'll hit you a high average. Doesn't miss very many pitches. I don't care what you're throwing—fastball, slider, changeup—it doesn't matter. You leave it out over the zone, he'll hit it."

The Red Sox had played Head at first base, but the Athletics moved him back to third base, his high school position, after acquiring him in the Andrew Bailey deal last December. He has the hands and arm strength to make the routine play, but he's a well below-average runner with limited range.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
267 57 102 23 6 18 56 23 55 3 0 .382 .433 .715

8. Kyle Parker, of, Modesto (Rockies)
Age: 22  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 200  Drafted: Clemson, 2010 (1st round).
After missing five weeks when a pitch hit him on the left wrist in the second game of the year, Parker bounced back to slug 23 homers and lead the Cal League with a .415 on-base percentage. He slugged 19 homers in 67 second-half games, a binge made more impressive by the fact that Modesto's Thurman Field favors hitters less than most of the league's parks.

Parker has the raw power to be an annual 25-homer threat, and he should be able to get to that power with the improvements he made in his second full pro season. He shortened his swing, enabling him to handle inside pitches better, and he developed more discipline. He consistently works his way into hitter's counts, then takes walks or punishes pitchers if they challenge him.

A starting quarterback at Clemson, Parker has a strong arm and is a serviceable defender. Though he has below-average speed, he moves around better in right field than his meager stolen-base total (one in three attempts) might suggest.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
390 86 120 18 6 23 73 66 88 1 2 .308 .415 .562

9. C.J. Cron, 1b, Inland Empire (Angels)
Age: 22  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 235  Drafted: Utah, 2011 (1st round).
The Angels made Cron the 17th overall pick in the 2011 draft on the strength of his bat and he didn't disappoint in his first full pro season. He made the jump to high Class A, led the minors with 123 RBIs and topped the league with 271 total bases while playing through a torn labrum in his right shoulder that required surgery in late August. Modesto manager Lenn Sakata compared him to Billy Butler, though Cron projects to put up bigger home run numbers.

Cron has tremendous power but doesn't sell out to get to it, making him more than just a one-dimensional hitter. He goes up to the plate with a plan, fouls off tough pitches and uses the opposite field when appropriate. His ability to handle breaking pitches improved as the season went on, though there are also some reservations about whether he can catch up to quality fastballs.

A catcher at the start of his college career, Cron made the transition to first base in 2011 after hurting his shoulder. He's a well-below average runner but moves well for his size. While he's still learning his new position, he shows the ability to pick low throws out of the dirt.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
525 73 154 32 2 27 123 17 72 3 4 .293 .327 .516

10. Andrew Chafin, lhp, Visalia (Diamondbacks)
Age: 22  B-T: R-L  Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 205  Drafted: Kent State, 2011 (1st round supplemental).
For the first two months of the season, Chafin was one of the Cal League's best pitchers, going 3-0, 2.91 with 77 strikeouts in 59 innings. For the next two, he was one of its worst, posting a 1-6, 10.26 record and completely losing the strike zone. Sent to the bullpen to work out his control problems and limit his innings in his first full pro season, he closed his season with three strong starts and wound up leading the league in strikeouts per nine innings (11.0) and opponent average (.241).

When he's going well, Chafin operates with a 90-94 mph fastball that features cutting action at times, and he also can mix in a two-seamer with run and sink. His nasty slider is his best pitch, and he gained confidence in his changeup by season's end. His mechanics aren't smooth and detract from his command and control, leading some scouts to project him as a reliever.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
6 6 4.93 30 22 0 122 112 74 67 12 69 150 .234

11. Tony Cingrani, lhp, Bakersfield (Reds)
Age: 23  B-T: L-L  Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 200  Drafted: Rice, 2011 (3rd round).
A reliever when he came out of Rice, Cingrani has been a revelation since the Reds converted him to starting last summer. He began his first full pro season by making 10 dominant starts for Bakersfield—he didn't permit more than two earned runs in any of them—and finished it in the big leagues. He led the minors with a 1.73 ERA.

Cingrani exudes confidence on the mound, pitching off his above-average fastball. His heater works primarily at 91-93 mph and can reach the mid-90s. It has some late life and he doesn't hesitate to pitch inside.

Cingrani can locate his fastball and his changeup to both sides of the plate. The changeup is his main secondary pitch and fades away from righthanders, whom he held to a .170/.213/.265 line in the Cal League. His slider lags behind his other offerings, though it improved this year to the point where more scouts believe he can remain a starter.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
5 1 1.11 10 10 0 57 39 13 7 2 13 71 .187

12. Chris Owings, ss, Visalia (Diamondbacks)
Age: 20  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 5-10 Wt.: 180  Drafted: Gilbert (S.C.) HS, 2009 (1st round supplemental).
After hitting .246/.274/.388 playing a full year in the Cal League in 2011, Owings ripped up the circuit in his second try and earned a midseason promotion. He did a better job of hanging in against breaking pitches that fooled him a year ago, when he looked for fastballs too often. He still handles fastballs well, but his improved approach helps him do a better job of staying inside balls and using the whole field.

Owings has great hands at the plate, generating enough bat speed to give him close to average power despite his modest size. He hit 17 homers this year combined between Visalia and Double-A Mobile, and Hardtke said Owings has the potential to reach the 20-mark down the road.

Owings was one of the best defensive shortstops in the league, and managers rated him as having its strongest infield arm. He doesn't have flashy speed, but his range plays up thanks to his instincts. He could top out around 20 steals annually once he improves his skills on the bases.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
241 51 78 16 2 11 24 13 63 8 3 .324 .362 .544

13. David Holmberg, lhp, Visalia (Diamondbacks)
Age: 20  B-T: R-L  Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 219  Drafted: Port Charlotte (Fla.) HS, 2009 (2nd round).
Holmberg struggled after being promoted to Visalia in July 2011, but he breezed through the Cal League this year en route to a June promotion to Double-A at age 20. His polish on the mound belies his youth, as he shows a feel for mixing his fastball, slider and changeup.

The changeup sticks out as Holmberg's best offering, showing sinking action in the low 80s. He commands the changeup well and has the confidence to use it in any situation, throwing it for strikes or as a chase pitch. It helped him limit Cal League righthanders to a .199 average.

Holmberg's fastball sits mainly at 90-91 mph, though it can hit 93 and he can give it cutting action. His slider shows promise but is clearly his third option. He's sound mechanically and methodical on the mound, moving the ball around the strike zone and setting hitters up effectively.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
6 3 2.99 12 12 0 78 62 31 26 6 14 86 .209

14. Domingo Santana, of, Lancaster (Astros)
Age: 19  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-5 Wt.: 228  Signed: Dominican Republic '09.
Santana cuts an imposing figure at the plate with his physical, 6-foot-5 frame. He shows not only tremendous power to all fields but also signs of becoming a complete hitter. Though he benefited from playing at the launching pad that is Clear Channel Stadium, he was just as productive on the road (.300/.374/.521, 11 homers) as he was in Lancaster (.304/.396/.553, 12 homers).

Resisting the temptations of his home park, Santana made strides in his approach. He toned down his aggression from early in the season and did a better job of staying up the middle. He learned that with as much strength as he has, he doesn't need to sell out to try to hit home runs.

Santana is still a work in progress defensively but has the tools to be an asset in right field. His arm is strong enough for him to stay at the position. He's an average runner.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
457 87 138 26 6 23 97 55 148 7 1 .302 .385 .536

15. Leon Landry, of, Rancho Cucamonga (Dodgers)/High Desert (Mariners)
Age: 22  B-T: L-R  Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 185  Drafted: Louisiana State, 2010 (3rd round).
Landry endured a disappointing 2011 season in low Class A, hitting .250/.307/.360 in his first full year as a pro, but he learned from the experience and came back strong in 2012. He won the Cal League batting title (.341) and also topped the circuit in triples (18) and extra-base hits (65). Along the way, he moved from the Dodgers to the Mariners in the Brandon League deal at the trade deadline.

His batting stance is somewhat unorthodox, as he holds the bat very low a la Eric Davis, yet Landry is a good high-ball hitter. He can get his bat around on quality fastballs and has the strength in his wrists and forearms to put up decent home run totals. While he has a knack for barreling balls up, he does struggle with quality breaking stuff at times.

Landry doesn't have blazing speed but he runs well enough and his instincts make him a quality center fielder. His lone below-average tool is his arm. He's a capable basestealer, though the Mariners worked with him to be more aggressive after acquiring him.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
449 88
153 34
18 13
76
19 66
27 11
.341 .371 .584

16. Nick Maronde, lhp, Inland Empire (Angels)
Age: 22  B-T: B-L  Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 205  Drafted: Florida, 2011 (3rd round).
Though Maronde was a reliever his last two seasons in college, the Angels chose to develop him as a starter this year, his first full pro season. The only things that slowed him down were elbow and back issues that necessitated him being shut down in May and June. When he returned in July, he allowed just one run in four starts before moving up to Double-A and ending the season in Los Angeles' bullpen, becoming the fourth player from the 2011 draft to reach the majors.

Maronde's fastball velocity varies, dipping into the high 80s at times, but he's capable of working in the low 90s and touched 94 mph when he came out of the big league bullpen. His fastball command is outstanding, as evidenced by his walk rate (1.7 per nine innings) in the minors. His slider is his go-to secondary pitch and is a plus offering at its best, though it can get flat and sweepy.

Maronde's changeup shows flashes of being a decent third pitch, though it isn't helped by the fact that it comes in at the same low-80s velocity as his slider. He gets high marks for his quick tempo and aggressive style on the mound, though his arm action worries some scouts.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
3 1 1.82 10 10 0 59 40 13 12 4 14 60 .183

17. Donn Roach, rhp, Inland Empire (Angels)/Lake Elsinore (Padres)
Age: 22  B-T: R-R  Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 200  Drafted: JC of Southern Nevada, 2010 (3rd round supplemental).
In early May, the Angels traded Roach to the Padres in the deal that sent Ernesto Frieri to Los Angeles. While Frieri became a mainstay of the Angels' bullpen, Roach dominated the minors' most challenging circuit for pitchers. He was a prolific ground-ball artist in the Cal League, racking up a 3.8 groundout/flyout ratio.

Roach lives off his devastating sinker, which sits in the low 90s and tops out at 94. He routinely pitches deep into games getting quick outs with the sinker. When he does go deeper in counts, he turns to his tumbling splitter to get swings and misses.

Roach does have a third pitch, a downer curveball in the mid-70s. He doesn't go to the curve much, usually employing it early in counts on his second or third trip through the order. He's a good athlete with a clean delivery and a feel for moving the ball around the strike zone.
W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
10
1
1.94 14
13
0 88
77
26
19 2
14
73
.231

18. Brad Miller, ss, High Desert (Mariners)
Age: 22  B-T: L-R  Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 185  Drafted: Clemson, 2011 (2nd round).
Miller earned renown around the league for his discipline and toughness at the plate. Though scouts have concerns about a bat wrap in his swing, he has outstanding bat-on-ball ability and spraying line drives all over the field. He seldom swings at balls outside the strike zone and is unafraid to go deep in counts, perpetually taxing pitchers.

Though Miller did much of his slugging at home—which is typical for High Desert hitters—he has a strong, wiry frame that could produce close to average power in time.

"He can drive the ball the other way. He can pull the ball. You think you make a pretty good pitch on him and he's barreling the ball up and still driving it," Wooten said. "He just has a solid approach."

Errors have plagued Miller going back to his college days and he made 31 in 97 Cal League games (though 22 did come at High Desert, which has a notoriously poor playing surface). He has plus speed and range and gets to balls some shortstops don't, but he also has to do a better job of reading hops and getting in the right position. An inconsistent release point at times negates his adequate arm strength.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
410 89 139 33 5 11 56 52 79 19 6 .339 .412 .524

19. Cory Spangenberg, 2b, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
Age: 21  B-T: L-R  Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 185  Drafted: Indian River (Fla.) JC, 2011 (1st round).
Playing his first full year in high Class A, Spangenberg hit a respectable .291/.333/.388 in the first half. After a concussion sidelined him for six weeks, he batted just .224/.303/.267 after the all-star break while struggling to regain his timing and rhythm.

Early in the season, Spangenberg tried too much to hit balls the other way and left himself vulnerable to being busted inside. After making some adjustments, he showed he can hit balls hard in different parts of the strike zone. He won't hit many home runs, but he has enough gap power that defenses can't play in too much.

Spangenberg isn't the smoothest defender and has a below-average arm, but he has a knack for getting in the right positions to make all the plays at second base. He's a well above-average runner, capable of getting from home plate to first base in 4.0 seconds. He's a capable bunter and projects as a threat to swipe 40-50 bases annually once he learns the nuances of basestealing.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
384 53 104 12 8 1 40 26 72 27 9 .271 .324 .352

20. Joe Panik, ss, San Jose Giants
Age: 21  B-T: L-R  Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 190  Drafted: St. John's, 2011 (1st round).
Overcoming a slow start, Panik hit .337/.400/.438 in the second half. He utilizes an open setup with a compact swing, producing line drives from gap to gap. He was the toughest batter to strike out in the league, whiffing only once every 11.2 plate appearances.

Aside from his hitting, none of Panik's other tools are very loud, but he earns praise as a solid all-around player. He won't hit many home runs and his speed is only fringy, so he won't be a big threat on the bases. He's not flashy at shortstop, but he's a reliable and intelligent defender who makes all the routine plays.

Managers rated Panik the league's best defensive shortstop and his .972 fielding percentage topped the league at the position. He has an accurate throwing arm, but its strength is borderline for the position, an issue that dates back to labrum surgery he had after his freshman year at St. John's. Opinions are mixed as to whether he'll be able to stick at shortstop in the long term or have to move to second base, where he'd still have value as a lefthanded-hitting middle infielder.
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
535 93 159 27 4 7 76 58 54 10 4 .297 .368 .402