League Top 20 Prospects

New York-Penn League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports





FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. *Nolan Reimold, of, Aberdeen
2. *Chris Volstad, rhp, Jamestown
3. *Wade Davis, rhp, Hudson Valley
4. *Eduardo Nunez, ss, Staten Island
5. *Radhames Liz, rhp, Aberdeen
6. *Jacoby Ellsbury, of, Lowell
7. *Jed Lowrie, ss/2b, Lowell
8. *Garrett Olson, lhp, Aberdeen
9. *Jacob McGee, lhp, Hudson Valley
10. *Tyler Greene, ss, New Jersey
11. *Gaby Sanchez, 3b/1b, Jamestown
12. Luis Soto, of, Lowell
13. *Clay Buchholz, rhp, Lowell
14. *Michael Hollimon, ss, Oneonta
15. Welinson Baez, ss, Batavia
16. *Jensen Lewis, rhp, Mahoning Valley
17. Ryan Patterson, of, Auburn
18. Kevin Whelan, rhp, Oneonta
19. Nick Webber, rhp, New Jersey
20. *Bobby Parnell, rhp, Brooklyn
*Has played in major leagues
Baseball America's League Top 20 lists are generated from consultations with scouts and league managers. To qualify for consideration, a player must have spent at least one-third of the season in a league. Position players must have one plate appearance for every league game. Pitchers must pitch 1/3 inning for every league game, and relievers have to have made at least 20 appearances in full-season leagues and 10 in short-season ones.

The short-season New York-Penn League featured plenty of young, raw prospects with significant upside, but very few sure things. There was no clear-cut No. 1 prospect this summer like Ryan Westmoreland, Jason Castro and Brett Cecil in recent years. Lowell third baseman Kolbrin Vitek was the only 2010 first-rounder who spent any meaningful time in the league, and many of the biggest-name college products struggled in the NY-P.

"The New York-Penn League wasn't as good as it was last year," Connecticut manager Howard Bushong said. "Especially the pitching—it wasn't even close. And there wasn't a position player who blew you away like Westmoreland last year, and no (Alex) Colome like last year that made you go, 'Wow.' I saw some good players, but I didn't see the 'wow' factor we saw last year."

League champion Tri-City featured some of the best players in the NY-P, most notably second baseman Ben Orloff, but no top-flight prospects. "Everyone on their staff could throw strikes and throw breaking ball for strikes," Bushong said. "That's what separated them, that's why they won."

1. Carlos Perez, c, Auburn Doubledays (Blue Jays)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-0. Wt.: 193. Signed: Venezuela, '08.
A year after signing out of Venezuela as a 17-year-old, Perez ranked as the No. 5 prospect in the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League in 2009. He had a fine encore in the NY-P, showing maturity beyond his years with the bat and behind the plate.

"He catches, he throws, he blocks balls very well," Auburn manager Dennis Holmberg said. "He's got a major league approach to hitting, he hits the ball to all fields, and he has very good speed for a catcher. Unlike most catchers that are below-average to well below-average, he's got tremendous instincts on the bases, reads balls in the dirt really well, he's aggressive first to third, makes the turn well at all bases. He does everything natural."

Perez has a chance to be a standout defensive catcher, thanks to his soft hands, quick feet, advanced game-calling skills and average arm strength with good accuracy and a quick release. He threw out 36 percent of basestealers for Auburn.

Offensively, he employs a patient, middle-to-away approach, and he routinely squares up balls and sends hard line drives into the gaps. He's not overly physical at 6 feet and 193 pounds, but he flashes occasional power.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
235 44 70
11 8 2 41
34
41 7 3 .298 .396 .438
 
2. Jake Thompson, rhp, Hudson Valley Renegades (Rays)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 225. Drafted: Long Beach State, '10 (2).
Thompson earned his GED diploma and enrolled a year early at Long Beach State, where he stepped right into a weekend rotation spot as an 18-year-old freshman. After an up-and-down college career, he signed for a $555,000 bonus as a second-round pick, then dominated the NY-P and finished the summer with 11 scoreless innings in the high Class A Florida State League.

"I loved him," Bushong said. "He was a true power arm. He was 94-95 against us with a hard slider. He dominated us."

Thompson often flashed a plus changeup in college, and it was on display this summer as well, though it tends to be too firm. While his slider was inconsistent at Long Beach, he developed more confidence and feel for the pitch, which reached the upper 80s at Hudson Valley. With his durable frame and loose arm, he could become a frontline starter if his secondary stuff and command continue to progress like they did this summer.

He worked hard this summer with Renegades pitching coach Jack Giese to improve his command and mechanics. Thompson tended to fly open at the front of his delivery in the past, but he did a better job staying closed this summer. He also worked to slow down out of the stretch, which helped him repeat his delivery more consistently.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
10
7
2 1 0 1.35
40
28
10 6 0 6 33 .200
 
3. Cory Vaughn, of, Brooklyn Mets
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 225. Drafted: San Diego State, '10 (4).
The son of former all-star Greg Vaughn, Cory announced his presence on the prospect landscape in the summer of 2008, when he ranked as the No. 1 prospect in the Northwoods League following an inconsistent freshman year at San Diego State. He showed an impressive blend of power and speed in college but also struck out 180 times in 592 at-bats.

Vaughn demonstrated a more mature approach as a junior, learning to hit the ball the other way with authority instead of trying to pull everything. Those improvements carried over to this summer, when he wore out the right-center gap while leading the NY-P in slugging (.557) and OPS (.953) while ranking second in homers (14) and RBIs (56). After struggling against breaking stuff for much of his college career, he showed the ability to recognize and hit breaking balls.

Physical and athletic, Vaughn has prototypical right-field tools. He has above-average power and a chance to be an average hitter. He also has an average arm, average speed and good defensive skills.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
264 45 81
14 5 14 56 34
63 12 5 .307 .396 .557
 
4. Marcell Ozuna, of, Jamestown Jammers (Marlins)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 190. Signed: Dominican Republic, '08.
Ozuna broke Jamestown single-season records for home runs (21) and RBIs (60), topped the league in both categories and finished two homers shy of the NY-P record, set in 1982. He also led the NY-P in strikeouts (94), illustrating his feast-or-famine approach.

A cousin of former Marlins utilityman Pablo Ozuna, he has lightning-quick hands and punishes fastballs, especially in typical fastball counts. When pitchers try to jam him inside, he shows the ability to stay back and shoot balls the other way. But Ozuna's righthanded swing gets long, he chases breaking balls down and fastballs up and lacks a mature two-strike approach.

Ozuna has two premium tools: massive raw power and an above-average arm that one manager referred to as a bazooka. He's an average runner who plays an adequate right field, though his routes are suspect at times. A classic boom-or-bust prospect, he could become a middle-of-the-order slugger if he can polish some of the rough edges of his game.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
270 53
72 11
2 21 60 17
94 3 1
.267 .314 .556
 
5. Roman Mendez, rhp, Lowell Spinners (Red Sox)
Age: 20. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 180. Signed: Dominican Republic, '07.
After signing for a $125,000 bonus in 2007, Mendez posted two dominant seasons in Rookie ball before jumping to low Class A to start 2010. He was hit hard in the South Atlantic League, but he recovered in the NY-P before the Red Sox traded him to Texas as the centerpiece of the Jarrod Saltalamacchia deal.

Mendez's delivery has some moving parts and some wrist funk in the back, but there are no red flags and his arm is exceptionally loose and fast. His explosive fastball sits in the mid-90s and tops out at 98 mph. He also flashes a plus slider that reaches 87 mph, though it's inconsistent.

His developing changeup also shows promise, giving him the makings of a three-pitch starter's repertoire. Mendez has No. 1 starter upside if everything comes together for him, but his command is a work in progress, as he needs to do a better job repeating his arm slot and release point.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
8
2 3 0 4.36
33
31
21 16 5 19 35 .240
 
6. Zack Von Rosenberg, rhp, State College Spikes (Pirates)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 205. Drafted: HS—Zachary, La., '09 (6).
Von Rosenberg's polish and projectability made him one of the top prep pitching prospects in the 2009 draft, and the Pirates bought him out of a commitment to Louisiana State with a $1.2 million bonus. His first pro season got off to a rough start, as he went 0-3, 7.50 in June, but he made adjustments as the season progressed, posting a 2.11 ERA in the next two months before the Pirates shut him down to get him some rest before instructional league.

"With the way he started to the way he finished, he showed me serious maturity," State College pitching coach Mike Steele said, "going from the high school superstar and turning himself into a major league prospect."

Von Rosenberg still is filling out his slender frame, and he figures to add velocity to his 87-91 mph fastball as he matures because he has a loose, easy arm action. He pitches to both sides of the plate with his fastball, and he's also capable of throwing his changeup and breaking ball for strikes in any count.

His changeup took a major step forward this summer, and it has good four-seam spin and deception. He snaps off a biting curveball with 11-to-5 break at times, but the pitch also can get loopy. His feel for pitching indicates he'll succeed at refining his offspeed pitches, and if his fastball velocity jumps, he could be a frontline starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13
1 6 0 3.20
59
60
24 21 4 13 39 .267
 
7. Kolbrin Vitek, 3b. Lowell Spinners (Red Sox)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 195. Drafted: Ball State, '10 (1).
A two-way star at Ball State, Vitek ranked as the No. 1 prospect in the Great Lakes League in 2009 and followed that up by earning second-team All-America honors last spring. Boston's top pick in the 2010 draft, he had a lackluster pro debut but did earn a late-season promotion to low Class A Greenville.

Vitek's bat is his ticket. He has a line-drive, gap-to-gap approach with plenty of bat speed, and he projects as an average or slightly better hitter with at least average power. He also has average-to-plus speed.

"I see the ability to hit 20-25 home runs in the big leagues and hit for decent average," Lowell manager Bruce Crabbe said. "Once he learns what his capabilities are, I've seen him drive balls as good as anybody, but mainly it's just commanding the zone. It's not a tool that you can learn that easily, but he's got it. You just see it right away."

After playing second base during the spring, Vitek moved to third base in pro ball and is still learning to get proper reads off the bat, taking correct angles to ball and throwing from the appropriate arm slot. He lacks true middle-infield actions, and his hands draw mixed reviews. He has arm strength but his release is rigid, and some scouts think he'll wind up in the outfield.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
204 30 55 13
3 4 30
26
61 13 2 .270
.360 .422
 
8. Nick Longmire, of, Batavia Muckdogs (Cardinals)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 180. Drafted: Pacific, '10 (5).
Longmire's solid three-year career at Pacific was highlighted by a big sophomore year in 2009, but his production dropped off some as a junior and he slipped to the fifth round of the draft. His pro career got off to a torrid start, as he hit .409/.453/.841 with three homers and 18 RBIs in 44 at-bats in June before cooling off.

Longmire flashes above-average raw power in batting practice, but he employed a gap-to-gap approach and a flat, line-drive swing this summer. He gets over-aggressive and chases pitches out of the strike zone at times, and he's still learning to pull balls with authority. A good athlete with average speed and a fringe-average arm, he can play all three outfield positions and shows good instincts in center.

"He may be the best player in the league, from everything I've seen. He killed us," Williamsport manager Chris Truby said. "He can run, he can throw, he plays the heck out of center field. He's got some juice in that bat. I like him a lot."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
265 53 76
11 7 9 55 34
62 12 3 .287 .372 .483
 
9. Cesar Hernandez, 2b, Williamsport Crosscutters (Phillies)
Age: 20. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 5-10. Wt.: 166. Signed: Venezuela, '06.
Hernandez impressed scouts at the Phillies' instructional league last fall, then posted a breakout season as a 20-year-old in the NY-P. A switch-hitter, he's a slasher who makes consistent contact and uses all fields from both sides of the plate. He has well below-average power but does have some strength to the pull side, particularly when batting righthanded.

Hernandez is a table-setter who can bunt and hit-and-run effectively, and his above-average speed plays very well on the basepaths. He ranked second in the league with 32 steals in 38 tries.

He has the tools to be a standout defender at second base and a solid fill-in at shortstop or third base. Hernandez has sure hands and slick infield actions, and he turns the double play very well. He has a solid, accurate arm and plenty of range at second base.

"He reminds me a little bit of an Alberto Callaspo/Erick Aybar type," Batavia manager Dann Bilardello said. "A great fielder, a switch-hitter and he can run real well."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
255 36 83
13 2 0 23 26
27 32 6 .325 .390 .392
 
10. Colton Cain, lhp, State College Spikes (Pirates)
Age: 19. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 225. Drafted: HS—Waxahachie, Texas, '09 (8).
The Pirates lured Cain out of a commitment to Texas by giving him an eighth-round-record $1.15 million bonus a year. A back injury hampered him in the offseason, and he made his pro debut in the Gulf Coast League in 2010. After four starts he moved up to State College, where he held his own as a 19-year-old.

"It's just straight horsepower behind a Texas body, and he's a gunslinger on the mound, just throwing missiles at guys," Steele said. "He's exciting because of the physicality and ability to get after guys."

Cain attacks hitters with his fastball, which sits at 88-91 mph and tops out at 93. His slurvy 2-to-8 breaking ball and changeup are both fringy at this stage, but he has feel for both and he can throw all his pitches for strikes. The breaking ball, in particular, has a chance to be an out pitch if he can stay on top of it more consistently.

Cain is a little too upright in his delivery, and he opens a little too quick, which hinders his command. As he matures and gets more comfortable with his mechanics and stuff, he could develop into a workhorse starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
11
9
1 1 0 5.03
34
23
19 19 2 14 32 .189
 
11. Darrell Ceciliani, of, Brooklyn Mets
Age: 20. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 205. Drafted: Columbia Basin (Wash.) CC, '09 (4).
Like Red Sox center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury, Ceciliani is a native of Madras, Ore. The Mets signed him for $204,300 out of junior college in 2009 and assigned to the Rookie-level Appalachian League, where he struggled. He busted out in a big way in his first full pro season, winning the NY-P batting title (.351) and leading Brooklyn to the championship series.

"Man, he can really hit and he did it all year," a scout with a National League club said. "He has a good hitting approach, he uses the whole field, he hits lefties and righties—just did a good job. He's got good wrists and forearms, line-drive strength, maybe a 10-12 homer guy, but he will hit a lot of doubles."

Other evaluators say Ceciliani has a long swing and is susceptible to fastballs inside. But his bat stays in the zone for a long time, and he simply has a knack for making contact. He projects as an average-to-plus hitter with below-average power.

A 55 runner on the 20-80 scouting scale, Ceciliani gets good reads and jumps in center field. He has a fringe-average arm. He has a chance to be an everyday center fielder if he continues to hit like he did this summer, or he could have value as a fourth outfielder.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
271 56 95
19 12 2 35 24
56 21 14 .351
.410 .531
 
12. Domingo Santana, of, Williamsport Crosscutters (Phillies)
Age: 18. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 200. Signed: Dominican Republic, '08.
Santana opened 2010 as a 17-year-old in the South Atlantic League and struggled mightily against much older competition. He continued to pile up strikeouts after heading to the NY-P, but he also flashed the potential that caused the Phillies to sign him for $330,000 in 2008.

"He's had his moments, and he's struggled as well at times," Truby said. "For a kid who just turned 18, he shows you that power to the opposite field. He's not really a pull hitter. He's been facing these college guys who've had four years of college, and he's a kid. He's learning, getting better, a young, power guy that's exciting."

Santana will have to improve his contact rate in order to tap into his above-average raw power. Breaking balls eat him up, and though he occasionally shows the ability to turn on fastballs inside, he doesn't do so consistently. He's an average runner with a slightly above-average arm, but he must improve his reads, jumps and routes in right field.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
186 28 44 9
0 5 20 68
73 4 4 .237 .336 .366
 
13. Bryce Brentz, of, Lowell Spinners (Red Sox)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 180. Drafted: Middle Tennessee State, '10 (1s).
Brentz was a first-team All-American after hitting .465/.535/.930 with 28 homers as a sophomore at Middle Tennessee State in 2009. An ankle injury sidetracked him this spring, though he still put up solid numbers and earned an $889,200 bonus as a supplemental first-round pick. He had a miserable debut in the NY-P, in part because he had difficulty adjusting after the Red Sox asked him to wear contact lenses.

Brentz has big raw tools, but he'll have to refine his all-or-nothing approach to succeed in pro ball. He needs to do a better job commanding the strike zone, laying off pitches out of the zone and not trying to pull everything out of the ballpark. He did hit better in August after scrapping the contact lenses.

His exceptional bat speed gives him plus-plus raw power, and Brentz can punish fastballs both down in the zone and up. If he can become an average hitter—as some scouts believe he will in time—his game power should be above-average, at least. His plus arm, average speed and good defensive instincts give him a chance to be a quality defender in right field.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
262 28 52
14 4 5 39 21
76 5 4 .198 .259 .340
 
14. Mike Kvasnicka, of/3b/c, Tri-City Valley Cats (Astros)
Age: 21. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 200. Drafted: Minnesota, '10 (1s).
Kvasnicka started attracting attention after strong 2009 seasons at Minnesota and in the Northwoods League, and he boosted his stock by getting time behind the plate this spring. After signing for $936,000 as a sandwich pick, he saw time at three positions for Tri-City.

The switch-hitting Kvasnicka is a physical athlete with solid-average power potential. His swing has good balance, though it can be a bit long at times, and he has a decent feel for the strike zone, giving him a chance to be an average hitter. Kvasnicka has a shot to be an average defender behind the plate, thanks to good hands and mobility and a borderline plus arm. He looked uncomfortable at third base, however, and his reactions were slow. He spent his last 15 games in right field, where he's an adequate defender despite below-average speed.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
261 31 61
10 1 5 36 27
48 2 1 .234 .305 .337
 
15. Aaron Altherr, of, Williamsport Crosscutters (Phillies)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 190. Drafted: HS—Avondale, Ariz., '09 (9).
Altherr was regarded as a raw athlete coming out of high school in Arizona, but the Phillies love taking on those kinds of projects and signed him for $150,000 as a ninth-round pick. He started this year repeating the Gulf Coast League, where he showed much greater maturity in all facets of his game and earned a promotion to Jamestown.

"With the improvements he's made from last year to this year, you can only imagine what's coming," Truby said. "He's talented. He's a player. He's growing, and he's going to get bigger and stronger."

As Altherr fills out his lanky, fast-twitch frame, he figures to develop at least average power. He can get pull-happy at times, but he has shown the ability to drive the ball from line to line. He hammers first-pitch fastballs but struggles when pitched backwards.

Altherr is a plus runner with a solid arm who made great strides in center field this year, though he could wind up in a corner as he matures.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
94 11 27
7 3 0 10 8
13 2 3 .287 .350 .426
 
16. Drew Hutchison, rhp, Auburn Doubledays (Blue Jays)
Age: 20. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 165. Drafted: HS—Lakeland, Fla., '09 (15).
Hutchison didn't pitch last summer after signing at the deadline for $400,000 as a 15th-round pick, but he looked good enough in spring training that the Blue Jays considered jumping him to low Class A to make his pro debut. They exercised patience instead, and let him carve up the NY-P first. He was even better after a promotion to the Midwest League, posting a 1.52 ERA in five starts.

Hutchison has far more polish than most pitchers his age. He pounds the strike zone with an 88-92 mph fastball, and he has the confidence to throw his changeup in any count. He also mixes in a cutter and a slurvy breaking ball that needs some tightening.

"He has a terrific delivery and a crisp, clean, loose arm," Holmberg said. "He's a terrific competitor. He's got the competitiveness of a Spartan out there. Strength will come to him naturally as he grows and matures. Every time he pitches, he'll learn something."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
10
10
1 1 0 3.00
45 34
18 15 1 12 44 .201
 
17. Zack Dodson, lhp, State College Spikes (Pirates)
Age: 20. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 190. Drafted: HS—Castroville, Texas, '09 (4).
Dodson pitched one inning in the Gulf Coast League last summer after signing for $600,000 and passing up a scholarship to Baylor. He showed flashes of promise in his first full pro season as a member of State College's talented young rotation.

Dodson throws downhill with an 88-92 mph fastball from the left side, and hitters simply don't square him up often. The ball comes out of his hand easily, giving plenty of reason to believe he'll add velocity as he matures. He flashes a very promising curveball with 12-to-6 action, but he's still learning to throw it properly with consistency.

He also has a fringy changeup that has a chance to be above-average down the road, giving Dodson the makings of three average or better pitches. He still has a long way to go, as he must learn to repeat his delivery and improve his command.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
15
13
2 6 0 4.84
58
57
34 31 2 27 41 .265

18. Daniel Webb, rhp, Auburn Doubledays (Blue Jays)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 210. Drafted: Northwest Florida State JC, '09 (18).
Webb has shown premium arm strength since his high school days, but his lack of command, questionable secondary stuff and high price tag caused him to slip in the draft in both 2008 and 2009. The Blue Jays gambled and signed him for $450,000 as an 18th-round pick last year, and he again showed off huge arm strength in his uneven pro debut this summer.

He pitches at 93-95 mph with sink on his fastball, which tops out at 97. He has the makings of a promising changeup and a power slider, but both are works in progress.

Webb has a tendency to overthrow, causing him to drop his arm slot and open his front side. He's still trying to make the transition from thrower to pitcher, but he does have a clean arm action and a high ceiling if he can figure it all out.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13
0 6 0 5.24
57
69
43 33 4 26 39 .299
 
19. Josue Carreno, rhp, Connecticut Tigers
Age: 19. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 170. Signed: Venezuela, '07.
Carreno, who made his second NY-P start on his 19th birthday in June, made a name for himself in his first taste of baseball in the United States. He showed the possibility for two plus pitches if he can gain more consistency with his fastball and curveball.

His 90-94 mph heater lacks command, and his curveball sometimes features tight spin but at others is more of a roller. He's also making progress with a changeup and has started incorporating a two-seam fastball with excellent movement. He already controls his two-seamer better than his four-seamer.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
14
5 6 0 4.76 64 64
44 34 5 33
59 .254
 
20. Madison Younginer, rhp, Lowell Spinners (Red Sox)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 195. Drafted: HS—Mauldin, S.C., '09 (7).
The Red Sox spent $975,000 to sign Younginer away from Clemson, and he dazzled in instructional league last fall, running his fastball up to 97 mph and flashing a power curveball. He didn't show that kind of stuff in his pro debut this summer, but his fastball still featured plus velocity at 92-94 mph. Rather than a hammer, his curveball was a big, slow hook that he could throw for strikes, and he tended to leave it up in the zone often.

Still growing into his body, Younginer has a funky, rather stiff delivery that features odd pauses and a long, digging arm action. He struggles throwing strikes and holding runners. Nevertheless, his upside is tantalizing and he has plenty of time to develop.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
14
3 7 0 4.79 62
56
40 33 2 31 40 .247