League Top 20 Prospects

Appalachian League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports





FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. *Brandon Snyder, c/3b, Bluefield
2. *Colby Rasmus, of, Johnson City
3. Eric Campbell, 3b, Danville
4. Brandon Erbe, rhp, Bluefield
5. *Max Ramirez, c, Danville
6. *Jesse Litsch, rhp, Pulaski
7. Juan Portes, 2b/of, Elizabethton
8. Josh Flores, of, Greeneville
9. *Aaron Cunningham, of, Bristol
10. *Bryan Anderson, c, Johnson City
11. Matt Walker, rhp, Princeton
12. John Drennen, of, Burlington
13. Jairo Cuevas, rhp, Danville
14. Eli Iorg, of, Greeneville
15. John Matulia, of, Princeton
16. Koby Clemens, 3b, Greeneville
17. Alexander Smit, lhp, Elizabethton
18. Ryan Mullins, lhp, Elizabethton
19. Ryan Mitchell, rhp, Greeneville
20. Tyler Herron, rhp, Johnson City
*Has played in major leagues
Baseball America's League Top 20 lists are generated from consultations with scouts and league managers. To qualify for consideration, a player must have spent at least one-third of the season in a league. Position players must have one plate appearance for every league game. Pitchers must pitch 1/3 inning for every league game, and relievers have to have made at least 20 appearances in full-season leagues and 10 in short-season ones.

BURLINGTON, N.C.—The Astros sent three of their top four 2010 draft choices, outfielder Delino DeShields and righthanders Mike Foltynewicz and Vincent Velasquez, to the Rookie-level Appalachian League in an effort to expedite their development. Similarly, Houston sent past premium picks Jordan Lyles and Jay Austin (2008) and Jiovanni Mier and Jonathan Meyer (2009) to Greeneville to launch their careers.

But the Astros are the exception in the Appy League, where nine of the 10 organizations (all but the White Sox) have complex-based Rookie-level affiliates in the Arizona or Gulf Coast leagues and usually send their high school picks there. Eight of the parent clubs (excepting only the Braves and Twins) operate short-season affiliates in more advanced leagues than the Appy, and often send their college draftees there. Not coincidentally, either Danville (Braves) or Elizabethton (Twins) won the league title six out of seven seasons from 2003-09, and Elizabethton played for the championship this year.

Baseball's lack of a cohesive short-season structure has turned the Appy League something of a hybrid. The league's brightest prospects tend to be a hodgepodge of second-year pros who signed at the previous draft's signing deadline (such as Princeton outfielder Todd Glaesmann), a smattering of junior college players (highlighted by Danville shortstop Andrelton Simmons this year) and Latin American prospects in their first or second year in the United States. The last group grabbed the top four slots on this list, starting with Danville lefthander Carlos Perez, and eight of the first 10.

1. Carlos Perez, lhp, Danville Braves
Age: 18. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 195. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
Carlos Perez
Perez worked with the same Dominican trainer, Edgar Mercedes, who delivered righthander Michael Ynoa to the Athletics for $4.25 million in 2008. The Braves signed Perez for $600,000, making him a relative value in light of his rapid ascension to low Class A in late July. A right rib fracture ended his season after just two starts with Rome. He streaked across the Appy landscape, allowing just eight runs in six starts.

Perez sits in the low 90s and can touch 94 mph, and his projectable 6-foot-2 frame leaves ample room to dream on more velocity. He throws his hard curve more as a chase pitch, but he ought to throw more called strikes with experience. His fringy changeup is strictly a third pitch but will be a point of emphasis going forward.  He maintained velocity from the stretch, and one opposing manager clocked him as fast as 1.05 seconds to the plate. Coupled with his quick move to first, that makes him difficult to run on.

"He was here for a bit, but he didn't belong in this league," Pulaski manger Eddie Menchaca said. "He's got a power arm and great poise—in, up, down, away with every pitch. He's probably the best I saw here."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
6
6
2 0 0 1.13 32 20
8 4 0 14 27 .185
 
2. Enny Romero, lhp, Princeton Rays
Age: 19. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 165. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
The Rays' focus on Latin America has produced tangible results, especially in terms of pitchers. Righthanders Albert Suarez, Alex Colome (both 2008) and Wilking Rodriguez (2009) all passed through Princeton before having success in Class A this year. Romero and fellow lefthander Braulio Lara are the next wave.

Romero could do no wrong in the Appy League, winning the ERA title (1.95) and ranking second in WHIP (0.94), third in strikeouts per nine innings (9.4) and fourth in opponent average (.204). He has the stuff to back those numbers up: a 92-96 mph four-seam fastball with armside run and a 12-to-6 curveball with short, quick spin.

His changeup softened considerably over the course of the season, and he'll continue to work to refine the pitch. He locates the the ball down in the zone, throws strikes and trusts his stuff.

"He's got major league stuff and a major league body. Plus he's a great kid," Princeton manager Michael Johns said. "In my mind, he can't miss."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13
4 1 0 1.95
69
51
15 15 2 14 72 .204
 
3. Oswaldo Arcia, of, Elizabethton Twins
Age: 19. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-0. Wt.: 210. Signed: Venezuela '07.
An easy choice as league player of the year, Arcia led the Appy in nine key categories, including batting (.375), on-base percentage (.424), slugging (.672) and RBIs (51). His slugging percentage was the second-highest in the league in the last 14 seasons, behind only Greeneville's Mitch Einerston's .692 in 2004, and he fell just three homers short of the triple crown.

"He's the best hitter at that age I've seen," Johns said. "Even in lefty-on-lefty situations, he keeps his shoulder in and stays on the pitch."

Despite Elizabethton's inviting right-field porch, Arcia consistently lined the ball up the middle and to left field with authority, showing a mature, all-fields approach. The numbers back this up, as he hit 12 of his 14 homers on the road.

Reviews of the rest of Arcia's game were mixed. He swings and misses a lot, especially against lefthanders, and he struggled at times to maintain balance against breaking balls. He also fought a hitch in his swing where he would drop his hands during his load. Arcia runs and throws OK and profiles best as a run-producing right fielder, though he played mostly center for Elizabethton.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
259 47 21
7 7 14 51
19 67 4 4 .375 .424 .672
 
4. Oscar Taveras, of, Johnson City Cardinals
Age: 18. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 180. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
For a player with little pro experience and less fanfare, Taveras showed remarkable polish in making his U.S. debut for the Appy League's championship team. He flashed all five tools and finished third in the batting race.

"He's got everything you want to see in a hitter, and he'll only improve with more at-bats," Johnson City manager Mike Shildt said. "He's able to handle different pitches, and he's got bat speed and strength as well as an aggressive, confident approach."

Taveras employs a spread-out batting stance, and some managers wondered if his funky hitting mechanics would continue to work. His leg kick fires late sometimes, and his high back elbow slows his bat ever so slightly. But it's hard to quibble with the results.

He hit well with two strikes and has tremendous hand-eye coordination. Furthermore, Taveras is a lanky athlete with plenty of room to mature and hit for even more power. While he may not stick in center field, he earns average grades for his defense, speed and arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
211 39
68 13
3 8 43 12
41 8 5 .322 .362 .526
 
5. Delino Deshields, of, Greeneville Astros
Age: 18. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 5-9. Wt.: 188. Drafted: HS—College Park, Ga., '10 (1).
Selected eighth overall in June, DeShields signed with the Astros in early August and quickly made an impression on Appy managers in his three weeks with Greeneville. DeShields' father, also named Delino, stole 463 bases in a 13-year big league career, and the younger Delino also boasts top-of-the-line speed. He swiped five bases and showed gliding actions and plus instincts in center field.

The Astros intend to transition DeShields to second base in instructional league, and they envision him as a top-of-the-order hitter. What he lacks in physicality, he makes up for with a simple, repeatable swing that bodes well for his ability to hit for average as he moves up. He frequently got himself out by chasing breaking balls, but observers saw the present strength and bat speed to foresee at least average power in DeShields' future.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
67
11
21
6
1 0 8 5 18 5 1 .313 .356 .433
 
6. Ramon Morla, 3b, Pulaski Mariners
Age: 20. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 175. Signed: Dominican Republic '06.
With 17 home runs, Morla went deep more often than any Appy Leaguer since Danville's Eric Campbell hit 18 in 2005. Morla resembles '05 vintage Campbell in that he's a 20-year-old third baseman with solid supporting tools. Campbell quickly wore out his welcome with the Braves and ultimately earned his release in August 2009, but Morla won over the entire league with his intelligent play, leadership qualities and well above-average power to all fields.

"He can hit the ball out anywhere," Pulaski batting coach Rafael Santo Domingo said, "even to deepest straightaway center field."

Far from a one-dimensional slugger, Morla maintains balance at the plate and barrels the ball well. His swing got big and the strikeouts piled up when he tried to overpower pitches. To his credit, he finished (a distant) second in the batting race to Arcia while running well enough to steal 13 bases and lead the league with 60 runs scored.

Morla should slow down as he matures, but he shows good range and soft hands at third base, with first-step quickness to both sides. He completes the defensive picture with a strong, accurate throwing arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
251 60 81
17 2 17 49 15 65 13 4 .323 .364 .610
 
7. Mike Foltynewicz, rhp, Greeneville Astros
Age: 18. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 200. Drafted: HS—Minooka, Ill., '10 (1).
Taken by the Astros 11 picks after DeShields, Foltynewicz signed quickly and got 12 pro starts under his belt. The results were uneven, but he rebounded from an eight-run shellacking by Princeton to post an 0.48 ERA over his final four starts.

Foltynewicz ranked as the top pitching prospect in the Upper Midwest this year, thanks to a 90-94 mph fastball and projectable 6-foot-4 frame. Appy managers provided generally positive reviews, despite the teenager's fluctuating radar-gun readings and sometimes nonexistent breaking ball.

Much like Lyles did two years ago, he threw strikes and showed uncanny confidence in his changeup for a prep righthander. Foltynewicz disguises his changeup, which features heavy, late sink, with good arm speed. At his best, he snaps 75-78 mph curveballs from his fastball arm slot with tight, rotational bite—but feel for the breaking ball often evaded Foltynewicz in his debut.

"We saw him at 93 mph, and he's only going to get stronger," Bristol manager Ryan Newman said. "The secondary stuff didn't stand out, but you can see he's going to be real good once he learns how to pitch."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12
0 3 0 4.03 45 46 24 20 3 15 39 .272
 
8. Adrian Salcedo, rhp, Elizabethton Twins
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 175. Signed: Dominican Republic '07.
The Twins sent Salcedo from extended spring training to high Class A Fort Myers in mid-May to cover for injuries. He ran up a 6.26 ERA, relying mostly on his fastball, while waiting for Elizabethton to begin play at the end of June. In the Appy League, he did a better job of incorporating his secondary pitches.

An exceptional athlete, Salcedo picks things up quickly, works hard and throws strikes. His sinker sits at 90-93 mph and bores down and in on righthanders. His slurvy, low-80s slider shows consistent tilt when he gets on top of the pitch.

With his athleticism and arm strength, Salcedo is a safe bet to reach his potential. Whether he does so as a starter or reliever will depend largely on how well he can fine-tune his changeup.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
16
8
4 3 1 3.27 66 55
27 24 3 10 65 .230
 
9. Aderlin Rodriguez, 3b, Kingsport Mets
Age: 18. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 210. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
In the international signing frenzy of 2008, Rodriguez's $600,000 bonus ranked just 17th-highest, tied with Perez. A wrist injury limited him in his 2009 debut, but he showed impressive bat speed and power this summer, finishing third in the league behind Arcia and Morla in homers (13), RBIs (48) and extra-base hits (35).

Rodriguez lacks the defensive profile of that duo, however, with a thick lower half and heavy feet. He's a below-average runner with hard hands, so he figures to migrate to first base or left field despite having plus arm strength. On the plus side, Rodriguez is younger and strikes out much less frequently than Arcia or Morla.

"He has a good eye for the zone. He's not a free swinger," Santo Domingo said. "I was impressed by his approach at the plate and his pitch recognition."

Rodriguez did draw criticism—and benchings—for uneven effort and lack of hustle. He'll go as far as his bat takes him.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
250 44 78 22
0 13 48 15
43 3 1 .312 .352 .556
 
10. Manuel Soliman, rhp, Elizabethton Twins
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 185. Signed: Dominican Republic '07.
Past Elizabethton clubs relied on high-powered offensive attacks to bludgeon opponents, but this year's Twins were different. Jim Shellenback, in his 14th year as pitching coach, called this year's staff the deepest group he's had in a while. Soliman's performance may have been the most impressive, given that he spent his first three seasons in the Rookie-level Dominican Summer League, the first two as a third baseman.

Soliman resembles Salcedo as a fastball/slider/changeup righthander who throws boatloads of strikes. He pitches at 90-92 mph and can touch 94, and he led the league with 10.3 strikeouts per nine innings. His resilient arm and sound delivery should allow him to remain a starter.

Shellenback worked with Soliman to improve his tempo, so he wouldn't jump at hitters, and to maintain his high three-quarters arm slot. When he stays on top of his slurvy breaking ball he gets two-plane break at about 80-82 mph, but he'll need to make continued strides with his changeup.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12
5 2 0 3.48 65 47
28 25 5 21
74 .201
 
11. Vincent Velasquez, rhp, Greeneville Astros
Age: 18. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 185. Drafted: HS—Garey, Calif., '10 (2).
Velaquez didn't pitch as a high school junior because of a stress fracture and ligament strain in his pitching elbow. But the Astros bore down on him during his senior year, and he won the them over in a predraft workout. He missed his final start for Greeneville when scar tissue broke loose from his previous injury, causing discomfort and cutting short an impressive debut.

A switch-hitting shortstop in high school, Velasquez concentrated on pitching only this year and already shows a three-pitch mix. He comes right after hitters with an 88-93 mph fastball and a 72-76 mph curveball that he can throw with tight 11-to-5 spin. He has shown some feel for a changeup, which he'll require to profile as a mid-rotation starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
6
2 2 0 3.07 29 24
12 10 4 5
25 .216
 
12. Andrelton Simmons, ss, Danville Braves
Age: 20. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 170. Drafted: Western Oklahoma State JC, '10 (2).
A native of Curacao who was touted as the best defensive shortstop in the 2010 draft, Simmons also drew interest as a pitcher after flashing a 95 mph fastball and a mid-80s slider at Western Oklahoma State JC. Managers regarded him as the best shortstop in the Appy League after he showed three strong tools and proved to be the toughest batter in the league to strike out (once every 19.2 plate appearances).

Simmons slows the game down on defense, reading the ball well off the bat and always playing the right hop. He ranges well to both sides and has the arm strength to make throws from the hole. He made just nine errors in 62 games and led Appy shortstops in every conceivable category.

Though not a burner, Simmons has average speed and is a heady player who finished second in the league with 18 stolen bases. He tracks the ball very well at the plate and improved each month, culminating in a .286/.369/.362 batting line in August. He's skinny and does not project as a power threat.

"He's not a fast guy, but he makes every play," said Danville batting coach Carlos Mendez, who compared Simmons to current Braves shortstop Alex Gonzalez. "I don't think he'll hit a lot of home runs, but he'll get stronger and hit a lot of line drives."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
239 36 66 11 1 2 26 16
14 18 4 .276 .340 .356
 
13. Braulio Lara, lhp, Princeton Rays
Age: 21. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 180. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
Lara led his Dominican Summer League team in strikeouts in both 2008 and '09, but his command wavered and he tended to be too hard on himself. He took a step toward erasing those concerns this season, during which he led the Appy League in opponent average (.200) and threw five no-hit innings in his final start.

Batters seemed unprepared for Lara's 92-96 mph fastball, which comes from an easy pitching motion. While he relied on his two- and four-seam fastballs to retire batters, he also improved the consistency of his curveball and changeup. Both of his secondary pitches have the potential to become average or better.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13
6 4 0 2.18 66 49
26 16 2 25 58 .200
 
14. Cody Stanley, c, Johnson City Cardinals
Age: 21. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 5-10. Wt.: 190. Drafted: UNC Wilmington, '10 (4).
The Cardinals drafted Stanley in the fourth round in June for his offensive profile. He's a lefthanded-swinging catcher with solid hitting tools, athleticism and a track record with wood bats. He ranked fourth in the league in hitting (.321) and on-base percentage (.380), and he also won over Appy observers with his marked defensive improvement during his pro debut.

St. Louis employed four-time Gold Glove winner Mike Matheny as a special assistant to work with Stanley on his catching technique, specifically with regard to framing low sinkers, getting into better blocking position and cleaning up his footwork on throws. He erased 57 percent of basestealers to test him, though nobody regarded his arm as anything better than average. (In fact, Johnson City pitchers and catchers nabbed 56 percent of basestealers as a team, while the league averaged just 35 percent.) 

While he showed mostly gap power during the regular season, he smacked two home runs in the playoffs at Burlington, muscling one the other way and lofting one out to deep right field. He isn't afraid to hit with two strikes because he has a quiet hitting setup and controlled swing. He runs well for a catcher and his speed rates a 50-55 on the 20-80 scouting scale.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
209 34 67 12 5 5 39
21
30 8 1 .321 .380 .498
 
15. Todd Glaesmann, of, Princeton Rays
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 220. Drafted: HS—Waco, Texas, '09 (3).
Scouts compared Glaesmann with former Texas high school and college star Drew Stubbs, now with the Reds, leading up to the 2009 draft. Glaesmann carried those comps through season, showing above-average power but not enough feel for hitting in what essentially was his pro debut. He appeared in just five games after signing for $930,000 in August 2009.

Glaesmann has a body built to hit for power, with present strength, bat speed and long limbs to generate leverage. He connected for 17 doubles on the year and hit three home runs in a two-day period in late July, but overall he hit just .233 and struck out 70 times, third-most in the league. It's common for teenage hitters to chase pitches out of the zone, but he also swings through fastballs at times.

He runs well and can handle center field now, but as his body matures, Glaesmann probably will outgrow the position and take his strong arm to right field. If his power develops into a plus tool, the Rays will accept that tradeoff.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
236 41 55 17 5 4 24 13 70 13 6 .233 .297 .398
 
16. Pat Dean, lhp, Elizabethton Twins
Age: 21. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 180. Drafted: Boston College, '10 (3).
A third-round pick from Boston College, Dean was more advanced than most Appy pitchers and proved too crafty for the league's raw, developing hitters. Counting the playoffs, he had a 40-1 K-BB ratio in 30 innings. He consistently put opponents on the defensive with first- and second-pitch strikes, then finished them off with one of four pitches that grade as fringe-average to average.

Dean's velocity was down when he joined Elizabethton, but he soon found his customary 89-91 mph fastball and topped out at 92. He turns to his 12-to-6 curveball for most of his strikeouts, especially against lefthanders, and keeps hitters guessing with a fringy changeup and small-breaking slider.

Dean missed time with elbow inflammation in the spring, and because the Twins have no short-season affiliate, they opted to take it slow in his debut. Expect him to move quickly once he touches down in full-season ball in 2011.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
5
5
2 2 0 2.59 24 17
10 7 3 1 32 .198

17. Matt Heidenreich, rhp, Bristol White Sox
Age: 19. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 185. Drafted: HS—Lake Elsinore, Calif., '09 (4).
The White Sox gambled on the 6-foot-5 Heidenreich's projectable frame and arm speed when they made him a fourth-round pick last year. At that time, he topped out in the low 90s and had no secondary stuff to speak of. Complicating matters, he walked as many as he struck out (12) during his pro debut, which amounted to 16 relief appearances for Bristol.

But Heidenreich impressed Newman, who has managed him the last two years, with his new focus and maturity this season. He goes after hitters, throwing strikes and getting grounders with his 88-91 mph sinker. He made progress with his changeup, which can become an average pitch, but he'll need to continue to improve his slider.

"As a high school pick, it took him some time to get accustomed to doing this as a career," Newman said. "But he's made by far the biggest strides I've seen this year. The key is he throws all three pitches for strikes and gets early-contact outs, which allowed him to throw the amount of quality innings he threw this year."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
11
6 2 0 2.49
76
73
30 21 2 11 58 .253
 
18. Richard Vargas, rhp, Pulaski Mariners
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 170. Signed: Dominican Republic '08.
Vargas went 7-3, 1.69 while striking out 49 over 64 innings in the Dominican Summer League in his pro debut a year ago. For an encore he made seven starts for Eastern Division-winning Pulaski, showing explosive arm strength.

He missed three weeks at midseason with an oblique strain, but when healthy his plus sinker ranged from 93-96 mph and proved to be almost impossible to lift. Vargas permitted no home runs in 34 innings. Tall and lean, he oozes athleticism, leading to optimism that he'll throw more strikes in the future while learning to spin a slider and perfect a changeup.

He shows more feel for his breaking ball than fellow Pulaski flamethrower George Mieses, but it's still a below-average offering. Vargas challenges hitters and repeats his delivery well for a young pitcher, but it will be years before the Mariners know exactly what they have in him.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
9
7
1 2 0 4.54 34 36
24
17 0 14 28 .283
 
19. Jacob Petricka, rhp, Bristol White Sox
Age: 22. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 170. Drafted: Indiana State, '10 (2).
The White Sox drafted Petricka in the 38th round out of Faribault (Minn.) High in 2006, but didn't get their man until four years later as a second-rounder. In between, he had Tommy John surgery during his freshman year at Iowa Western CC and consistently added velocity afterward.

Petricka dominated the Appy League for eight starts, though at 22, he's the oldest prospect on this list. His fastball sat at 93-96 mph when he started for Bristol, and he hit 98 several times after moving to the bullpen at low Class A Kannapolis. He figures to stay in a relief role because he doesn't throw enough quality strikes when his delivery gets out of whack, and his curveball and changeup are fringy at best.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
8
2 4 0 2.86 35 25
12 11 1 7
38 .197
 
20. Hector Guevara, 2b, Princeton Rays
Age: 18. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 5-11. Wt.: 170. Signed: Venezuela '08.
The youngest regular position player in the Appy League, Guevara didn't exactly thrive but he didn't wilt either. The Rays skipped Guevara past the Gulf Coast League in assigning him to Princeton, while also switching him for shortstop to second base, originally to accommodate Brazilian Leonardo Reginatto.

Guevara showed a feel for hitting, a patient approach, average speed and a modicum of pop. His performance perked up in August, when he batted .295/.336/.410 with nine extra-base hits and five steals. He could develop into a .280 hitter with average power.

Defensively, he has good hands and nimble feet, which help him turn double plays. Guevara's arm rates as above-average for second base but might be a bit short to handle shortstop on an everyday basis.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
223 24 56 13 3 2 26 15 31 9 3 .251 .308 .363