League Top 20 Prospects

Southern League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports




FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. *Andy Marte, 3b, Greenville (Braves)
2. *Joel Guzman, ss, Jacksonville (Dodgers)
3. *Rickie Weeks, 2b, Huntsville (Brewers)
4. *Prince Fielder, 1b, Huntsville (Brewers)
5. *Jose Capellan, rhp, Greenville (Braves)
6. *Edwin Encarnacion, 3b, Chattanooga (Reds)
7. *Anthony Reyes, rhp, Tennessee (Cardinals)
8. *Kyle Davies, rhp, Greenville (Braves)
9. *James Loney, 1b, Jacksonville (Dodgers)
10. *Josh Barfield, 2b, Mobile (Padres)
*Has played in major leagues
After a pair of hard-throwing lefties (Clayton Kershaw and David Price) reigned in the Double-A Southern League in 2008, the circuit's top prospects this year were a quartet of high-ceiling hitting prospects.

Mississippi right fielder Jason Heyward looks like a future superstar. Birmingham's Gordon Beckham established himself as a candidate for the American League rookie of the year after joining the White Sox and moving to third base. Montgomery center fielder Desmond Jennings moved on to propel Durham to the Triple-A championship. Carolina right fielder Mike Stanton has as much raw power as any minor league hitter.

Bolstered by the second-half additions of Stanton and third baseman Matt Dominguez, Jacksonville dominated the second half and went on to win the league title.

Dominguez was one of several talented prospects who would have received Top 20 consideration had he played longer in the league. That group also includes Carolina first baseman Yonder Alonso and righthander Zach Stewart, and Tennessee shortstop Starlin Castro.

1. Jason Heyward, of, Mississippi Myrtle Beach (Braves)
Age: 20. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 220. Drafted: Braves '07 (1).
After earning a promotion to Mississippi from high Class A Myrtle Beach in late June, Heyward put up the best numbers of his pro career. He hit for average and power, walked more often than he struck out and was efficient stealing bases, finishing the season in Triple-A Gwinnett shortly after turning 20.

Baseball America's Minor League Player of the Year, Heyward is a potential five-tool superstar. He has outstanding bat speed and plus-plus raw power that shows up in game situations, as he routinely puts the barrel to the ball, doesn't chase pitches out of the strike zone and recognizes offspeed pitches well, showing the hands to adjust to good breaking balls and the ability to hit for power to all fields.

Heyward ran into some trouble in Double-A against good changeups, but as the season wore on he made adjustments and drove them for extra-base hits. He runs well for his size, with solid-average speed and good instincts on the bases. His quickness is also an asset in right field, where he has fine range and an accurate, above-average arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
162 32 57 13 4
7 30 28 19 5 1 .352 .446 .611
 
2. Gordon Beckham, ss, Birmingham (White Sox)
Age: 22. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-0. Wt.: 190. Drafted: White Sox '08 (1).
One year after sharing the NCAA Division I lead with 28 homers at Georgia, Beckham began 2009 in Double-A and quickly advanced to Chicago, where he was one of the top rookies in the American League. Beckham has a short, efficient swing with good bat speed, using quick hands and strong forearms to routinely put the barrel to the ball and drive it for power. He has a solid approach at the plate, showing the ability to recognize offspeed pitches, use the opposite field and employ a sound two-strike approach.

Most managers felt that Beckham could play shortstop at the major league level, as he has good athleticism, first-step quickness and a solid arm. Others thought he might be a better fit at second or third base partly because of his fringe-average speed, and the White Sox used him solely at the hot corner alongside Alexei Ramirez at short. Beckham's baseĀ­running still could use additional polish.

"I put a higher grade on Beckham than I put on any other player I saw this year," a National League scout said.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
147 23
44 17 0
4 22 14 24 1 0 .299 .366 .497
 
3. Desmond Jennings, of, Montgomery (Rays)
Age: 22. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 180. Drafted: Rays '06 (10).
After playing just 123 games the previous two seasons because of knee, back and shoulder injuries, Jennings finally stayed healthy in 2009. His plus to plus-tools on offense and defense were on full display as he won the league MVP award.

Jennings has good bat speed, a quick trigger and a swing that enables him to lace line drives to all fields. He has a quiet approach at the plate and his head stays locked in, enabling him to see the ball well and leading to an excellent feel for the strike zone. His speed, patience and ability to square balls up could make him a .300 hitter with high on-base percentages. He has gap power and should run into 10-15 home runs per season.

Jennings is a 70 runner on the 20-80 scouting scale, and he's a tremendous percentage basestealer, succeeding in 52 of 59 attempts at two levels this year. He has plus-plus range in center field, showing good instincts and good routes to the ball. He had a fringe-average arm in the beginning of the year, then worked hard on his throwing and made it average arm by the end of the season.

"I saw Desmond Jennings way too much," Mississippi manager Philip Wellman said. "That guy can beat you in a multitude of ways: defensively, with his bat and he creates a lot of havoc when he's on base."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
383
69 121 25 8
8 45 48 52 37 5 .316 .395 .486
 
4. Mike Stanton, of, Jacksonville (Marlins)
Age: 19. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 240. Drafted: Marlins '07 (2).
Still just 19, Stanton has as much raw power as anyone in the minors and potentially could hit 40-plus homers in a big league season. He generates power to all fields with outstanding leverage and torque in his swing. He's strong enough that he can get caught leaning out front and still hit balls over the fence.

Despite his strength and imposing frame, Stanton isn't physically maxed out yet. He has a live, athletic body with flexibility.

Scouts differ as to why Stanton has a high strikeout rate—some say he swings over or under pitches, while others say he's prone to chasing breaking balls out of the zone—but generally agree that there aren't any major issues with his swing. He has good hand-eye coordination and makes adjustments.

"He keeps his hands in a great spot for so many of his swings, and the results speak for themselves," an American League scout said. "His average on balls in play on a down year might be .340 because he just punishes the ball."

Some scouts felt Stanton still needs to polish his defense, but he's a 55 runner who tracks the ball well in right field and shows a 55 arm. He likely will slow down a tick as he continues to fill out, but he should be at least an average defender.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
299 49 69 15 2 16 53
31 99 1 1 .231 .311 .455
 
5. Jarrod Parker, rhp, Mobile (Diamondbacks)
Age: 20. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 180. Drafted: Diamondbacks '07 (1).
Parker has the stuff to be one of the top pitchers in baseball, but a late-season elbow injury kept him out for the season's final five weeks. He began throwing again in September and hopes to avoid surgery.

When healthy, Parker was electric, with a fastball that sat at 93-95 mph and touched 97 mph late into his outings. He also drops his arm slot on occasion to get more sink and induce more grounders.

His 80-84 mph slider is a swing-and-miss offering against both lefthanders and righthanders. It has hard, late tilt and two-plane depth, getting plus to plus-plus grades from scouts. His 81-84 mph changeup is inconsistent but also shows flashes of being an above-average pitch. He also mixes in an occasional 75-78 mph curveball as a fourth offering.

Parker has smooth, fluid arm action, and his athleticism helps him repeat his compact, free-and-easy delivery.

"The thing I liked about him was he's a very good athlete with a feel for pitching," Montgomery manager Billy Gardner Jr. said. "He was able to throw four pitches around the plate for strikes."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
16
16 4 6 0 3.68
78
82 35
32
2 34 74 .272
 
6. Tyler Flowers, c, Birmingham (White Sox)
Age: 23. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 245. Drafted: Braves '05 (33).
Flowers' best tools are his ability to hit, hit for power and control the strike zone. He has excellent plate discipline, recognizing offspeed pitches well with a patient approach that makes him an on-base machine. His size, strength and power swing give him plus power that's evident both in batting practice and game situations.

Flowers is an offensive-minded catcher, but he made significant improvements behind the plate his year. While some projected him as a first baseman entering 2009, his throwing, receiving, blocking and footwork all got better. He threw out 29 percent of basestealers between Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte.

Some scouts still see Flowers as a bit stiff, but others think he could become an average defensive catcher with more work. Like most backstops, he's a below-average runner.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
248
54 75 18 2 13 43 57 76 3 0 .302 .445 .548
 
7. Logan Morrison, 1b, Jacksonville (Marlins)
Age: 22. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 245. Drafted: Marlins '05 (22).
Morrison suffered a small fracture in his right wrist in the second game of the season, causing him to miss the first two months. Upon returning to the lineup, he showed his trademark outstanding approach and was one of the league's most productive hitters. He batted .360 with eight walks in seven playoff games, helping Jacksonville win the league title

Morrison has an excellent feel for the strike zone. He does a good job of staying in the middle of the field with a flat swing that allows him to stay square to the ball. He can spray the ball to all fields with a flat swing, driving the ball away and showing the ability to handle the inside pitch. His balance and advanced pitch recognition allow him to stay back on the ball and rarely get caught out front.

Though Morrison's above-average power comes out in batting practice, his swing and approach are geared more toward working the gaps than trying to lift it over the fence. He should develop more home run power as he matures.

"He's going to hit with some power," said an American League scout. "Not Stanton power, but he doesn't get fooled much out there." He's an average defensive first baseman with good hands and a strong arm, and could be a tick above-average in the future. While he's a below-average runner, he has solid actions around the bag and athleticism for his size.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
278 48 77 18 2 8 47 63 46 9 4 .277 .411 .442
 
8. Freddie Freeman, 1b, Mississippi (Braves)
Age: 19. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 220. Drafted: Braves '07 (2).
Those who saw Freeman in the high Class A Carolina League seemed more impressed than SL observers, but a left wrist injury hampered his production at Mississippi in the second half. His wrist had no structural damage, but inflammation and tendinitis ultimately led the Braves to shut him down in late August.

Freeman has a good approach at the plate for a 19-year-old, though his OBP was aided significantly by his 18 hit by pitches. He doesn't chase much out of the strike zone, uses the whole field and covers the plate well. He hit just two home runs in 41 games for Mississippi but shows plus raw power in batting practice.

"The swing is different from Heyward's," Wellman said. "They're built differently, but the thing they share is the approach at the plate, a good idea of the strike zone."

A good defender, Freeman has soft hands and has become adept at picking throws in the dirt. Also a pitching prospect in high school, he has a better arm than most first basemen. He's a below-average runner.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
149 15 37 8 0 2 24 11 19 0 0 .248 .308 .342
 
9. Jeremy Hellickson, rhp, Montgomery (Rays)
Age: 22. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 185. Drafted: Rays '05 (4).
Hellickson had problems keeping the ball in the park when he first reached the SL in 2008, giving up 15 longballs in 13 starts, including five in his first outing for Montgomery. He did a much better job commanding his fastball down in the zone and to both sides of the plate this year, and he overmatched hitters in both Double-A and Triple-A.

Throwing from a three-quarters arm slot, Hellickson works at 90-93 mph and touched 94. He keeps hitters off balance by throwing any pitch in any count, to the point where he has games where he throws nearly as many offspeed pitches as fastballs. His biggest improvement this year came with his 79-82 mph changeup, which became a plus pitch.

Hellickson throws a solid-average curveball at 77-80 mph, though he'll take something off it and throw it at 73-76 for an early-count strike. He can throw his curve for strikes, though more often he'll try to bury it in the dirt as a chase pitch. He had a tendency in the past to cast his curveball, but it showed sharper definition this year.

Hellickson has clean arm action, a repeatable delivery and a stride directly toward home plate. He did miss seven weeks in May and June with a shoulder sprain.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
11
11 3 1 0 2.38
57
41 16
15
4 14 62 .198
 
10. Josh Bell, 3b, Chattanooga (Dodgers)
Age: 22. B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 235. Drafted: Dodgers '05 (4).
Bell spent the season's first four months with Chattanooga before the Dodgers traded him to the Orioles in a deal for George Sherrill. Melvin Mora's contract expires after this season, so Bell could get an audition in Baltimore at some point in 2010.

Bell can punish low fastballs and hanging breaking balls, but some managers felt he could be beaten with good fastballs up in the zone. He's generally a patient hitter and has plus power. A switch-hitter, he has been markedly better from the left side of the plate, from which he has hit 41 of his 43 pro homers in full-season ball. He had a 1.043 OPS against righthanders in 2009, compared to .541 against lefthanders, and he might be more effective batting exclusively lefthanded.

While there were concerns earlier in Bell's career about his defense, he made a big leap forward. Managers rated him the SL's best defensive third baseman after he slimmed down and became more adept at making the routine play. His range is average, his hands are fine and he has an above-average arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
334 47 99 30 2 11 52 50 70 3 5 .296 .386 .497
 
11. Jay Jackson, rhp, Tennessee (Cubs)
Age: 21. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-1. Wt. 195. Drafted: Cubs '08 (9).
A two-way player at Furman and a ninth-round pick a year ago, Jackson looks like a steal for the Cubs.

Jackson has excellent arm strength and arm speed, sitting at 91-94 mph and touching 95 with his fastball. He shows the ability to spin two breaking balls, a plus curveball in the high 70s and an 83-87 mph slider that grades out as at least average. His changeup is still a work in progress but could become an average pitch down the road.

An excellent athlete, Jackson has fairly smooth mechanics but his command still needs work. He has a tendency to overthrow, rather than staying back in his delivery and letting his quick arm take over. He also has a tendency to drop his arm slot, which at 6-foot-1 gives him some issues with his plane to the plate.

"He's got a great live arm," an AL scout said. "It's just a matter of him learning how to command it, but not many guys who throw 94-95 at that age can command it yet."

Jackson won the SL all-star game, but he was demoted to high Class A in July for failing to comply with team policy. The Cubs promoted him to Triple-A for one start in September, when he gave up one run in six innings.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
16
16 5 5 0 3.70
83
73 35
34
7 39 77 .236
 
12. Todd Frazier, of/1b/2b, Carolina (Reds)
Age: 23. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 220. Drafted: Reds '07 (1s)
A shortstop at Rutgers, Frazier has played all four infield positions as well as left field in the minors. Reds manager Dusty Baker thought Frazier had a chance to his big league left fielder in 2010, so Frazier spent most of his Double-A time there, but by season's end he saw most of his action at second base. Third base might be his best spot, but Frazier played just four games there at Carolina because Juan Francisco was on hand, and Cincinnati's trade for Scott Rolen locks up the hot corner through 2010.

Frazier has an unorthodox swing with a pronounced arm bar, but thus far it has worked for him. He has the hand-eye coordination, athleticism and knack for the barrel to allow him to cover the plate. He's strong, but his swing is more conducive to generating drives in the gap than loft, and he tied for third in the minors with 45 doubles this season.

Frazier is an average runner with a strong, accurate arm and a quick release. Reviews on his left-field defense were mixed, but the Reds were impressed with the progress he made. Without the benefit of a spring training or instructional league to work at second base, his inexperience at the position was evident.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
451 59 131 40 2 14 68 42 67 7 8 .290 .350 .481
 
13. Jonathan Lucroy, c, Huntsville (Brewers)
Age: 23. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 185. Drafted: Brewers '07 (3)
Huntsville's roster couldn't compare to last year's group, which included Alcides Escobar, Mat Gamel and Matt LaPorta. Lucroy stood out among the 2009 Stars, showing on-base skills and the ability to get the job done defensively.

Lucroy has good rhythm and balance at the plate, with a short swing and excellent plate discipline. He squares the ball up with regularity, but his power is below average. He still needs to get better at turning on inside fastballs. He's a below-average runner but not bad for a catcher.

Scouts have varying opinions about Lucroy's defense. Some think he's ready to catch in the big leagues right now, while others say he's an offensive-minded catcher whose receiving and blocking skills need more polish.

He has a solid-average arm and a quick release, but inconsistent throwing mechanics cause his pop times to range from 1.8 to 2.2 seconds. Nevertheless, Lucroy threw out 40 percent of basestealers to rank second in the SL.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
419 61 112 32 2 9 66
78 66 1 1 .267 .380 .418
 
14. Chris Heisey, of, Carolina (Reds)
Age: 24. B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-0. Wt.: 200. Drafted: Reds '06 (17)
Heisey is the oldest prospect on this list, a 24-year-old who went to Messiah (Pa.) College and planned to become a teacher. Instead he signed as a 17th-round pick in 2006 and ended up schooling the rest of the SL before his late June promotion to Triple-A.

Thanks to his all-around instincts, Heisey gets the most out of his raw tools. He routinely puts together solid plate appearances with a good approach at the plate. His swing is sound and he makes contact regularly, showing good bat speed through the zone and staying in the middle of the field. He showed more power than he had in previous seasons, hitting a career-high 22 home runs between Carolina and Louisville.

An above-average runner who's smart on the basepaths, as he stole 21 bases in 24 attempts in 2009. He doesn't have a classic center fielder's body, but he plays good defense and has a strong, accurate arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
271 54 94 18 2 13 40
34 34 13 1 .347 .426 .572
 
15. Dan Hudson, rhp, Birmingham (White Sox)
Age: 22. B-T: R-R. Ht: 6-4. Wt.: 220. Drafted: White Sox '08 (5)
A fifth-round pick a year ago, Hudson opened the year in low Class A and breezed through all four of the White Sox's full-season affiliates before making his major league debut in September.

Hudson's fastball ranges from 90-93 mph, sitting at 91-92 and getting outs by riding in on righthanders and tailing away from lefties. His 81-83 mph changeup is his best secondary pitch, an above-average offering with fade and late sink.

Hudson's slider flashes average tilt and depth when he stays on top of it, though he has a tendency to drop his three-quarters arm slot down lower, causing it to flatten out. He can elongate the slider to make it sweepier against righthanders, or shorten up the break to make it more like a cutter against lefties.

Hudson's arm action has a long arm arc in the back, but his mechanics still provide deception because he's able to stay closed. He has a tendency to fly open with his delivery at times and needs to show more consistency with his command.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
9
9 7 0 0 1.60
56
37 11
10
1 10 63 .188
 
16. Jordan Danks, of, Birmingham (White Sox)
Age: 23. B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-4. Wt.: 210. Drafted: White Sox '08 (7).
Danks had only 40 games of pro ball under his belt when he received a promotion to Birmingham in mid-May. He batted .308/.387/.442 in his first 29 games for the Barons before missing two weeks in June with a sprained wrist. His hitting tailed off afterward, and he missed another week and a half in August with a finger injury.

A good athlete, Danks has a nice swing with good bat speed. He has a 6-foot-4, 210-pound frame, but he never has developed into a home run threat and his power still grades as below average. He works counts well enough to draw a fair number of walks, though he still needs to improve his ability to hit offspeed pitches. He's also a good bunter.

Danks is an above-average runner with good instincts in center field and a solid-average arm. He isn't wiry but still has room to pack on more mass, which would help his power but also might affect his future defensive position.

"He can play center field now," a NL scout said. "but I think with his body frame, he's going to grow to be a bigger guy, lose some speed and be a corner guy. But I like him."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
284
50 69 12
1 6 20 37 73 7 3 .243 .337 .356
 
17. Sean West, lhp, Jacksonville (Marlins)
Age: 23. B-T: R-L. Ht.: 6-8. Wt.: 240. Drafted: Marlins '05 (1).
West made eight starts for Jacksonville before getting his first callup to Florida in May. He spent two months in the Marlins rotation before returning to the Suns for four more starts in July and early August, then rejoined Florida for the remainder of the season.

A flyball pitcher, West works off an 87-94 mph fastball that sits at 90-92. He throws a good slider with two variations, one in the low 80s for a get-me-over strike and another in the mid- to high-80s with harder break. He mixes in a low- to mid-80s changeup that needs more work, though he began throwing the pitch more often in September.

West, who missed the entire 2007 season after having surgery to repair a torn labrum, throws slightly across his body, which puts excess stress on his arm and can hamper his command. At 6-foot-8, he gets great downhill angle but it might take him more time than most to hone his mechanics. He wore down in September, when his velocity diminished.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
11 7 3 0 4.78
64
68 37
34
12 28 65 .267
 
18. Andrew Lambo, of, Chattanooga (Dodgers)
Age: 21. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 190. Drafted: '07 (4)
The Dodgers' No. 1 prospect entering the season, Lambo played briefly in Double-A last year shortly after turning 20. He returned to the SL in 2009 for the full season and might end up repeating the level in 2010, as he posted mediocre numbers even in one of the league's more hitter-friendly parks.

Scouts who have followed Lambo the last two years said he didn't show the same power and liveliness in his bat that was present a year ago and worry that he might be a future fourth outfielder. Some scouts still liked his swing, as he has an advanced ability to drive the ball to the opposite field for a player his age. He has some raw power, though it showed up more as doubles (he finished third in the league with 39) than homers (11).

A well below-average runner, Lambo already is confined to left field. He does gets decent reads in the outfield and has an average, accurate arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
492
70
126 39 1 11 61 39 95 4 3
.256 .311 .407
 
19. Daniel Schlereth, lhp, Mobile (Diamondbacks)
Age: 23. B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-0. Wt.: 210. Drafted: Diamondbacks '08 (1).
The Diamondbacks drafted Schlereth with the 26th overall pick in June 2008, then brought him up to the big leagues in late May. Being rushed showed as he struggled with his command. He returned to Mobile after six relief outings with Arizona, then spent the rest of the season shuttling between the two stops.

Schlereth has a quick arm and three quality pitches, including a 92-95 mph fastball that touches 96. His power curveball is a plus pitch at 82-83 mph with sharp downward action. He also shows good arm speed on his 77-79 mph changeup, which should be a reliable third weapon for him with more experience.

Schlereth's command needs to progress for him to succeed in the majors, and the first step will be maintaining a consistent release point. He should be able to pitch in late-inning situations once he learns to locate his pitches, with the potential to be a closer down the road.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
21
0 0 0 4 1.01
27
14 3
3
1 16 39 .161
 
20. Travis Wood, lhp, Carolina (Reds)
Age: 22. B-T: R-L. Ht.: 5-11. Wt.: 166. Drafted: Reds '05 (2).
After posting a 7.09 ERA and 48 walks in 80 Double-A innings last year, Wood was a totally different pitcher in 2009. After improving his fastball command and cutter, he won the league's ERA title (1.21) and pitcher of the year award.

Though Wood has a fringe-average fastball at 88-91 mph, he still relishes pitching inside. His best pitch is his changeup, with plus to occasional plus-plus action, showing outstanding late sink and separation from his fastball at 75-79 mph. He uses his 83-86 mph cutter, which he first started throwing at the end of 2008, to jam righthanders.

Wood doesn't have a reliable breaking ball, but he'll mix in an occasional low-70s curve as a show-me strike early in counts.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
19
19 9 3 0 1.21
119
78
23 16
2 37 103 .189