League Top 20 Prospects

New York-Penn League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports

Lowell's Ryan Westmoreland leads the way




FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. Ambiorix Concepcion, of, Brooklyn (Mets)
2. *Anibal Sanchez, rhp, Lowell (Red Sox)
3. *Jason Vargas, lhp, Jamestown (Marlins)
4. *Taylor Tankersley, lhp, Jamestown (Marlins)
5. *Ben Zobrist, ss, Tri-City (Astros)
6. Jesse Hoover, rhp, Staten Island (Yankees)
7. David Haehnel, lhp, Aberdeen (Orioles)
8. *Tony Sipp, lhp, Mahoning Valley (Indians)
9. Christian Lara, ss, Lowell (Red Sox)
10. *Jeff Marquez, rhp, Staten Island (Yankees)
*Has played in major leagues
While 2008 was a strong year for the New York-Penn League, with catchers (led by Jason Castro and Derek Norris) and power arms (topped by Adam Reifer and Brad Holt) in abundance, most evaluators were disappointed by the short-season league's talent level in 2009. Lowell outfielder Ryan Westmoreland is a legitimate blue-chip prospect and Williamsport's Sebastian Valle established himself as one of the top young catchers in the lower minors, but the position-player crop dropped off quickly after that. The players who performed best lacked elite tools and easy profiles, while the players with the biggest tools performed poorly.

There was a decent supply of power arms in the league, led by Dominican righthanders Alexander Colome and Arodys Vizcaino. Those two have a chance to be high-end starters, but most of the other electric arms in the league belong to older prospects who profile as relievers.

No 2009 first-round picks logged any meaningful time in the Penn League, and several players with four years of college experience—seniors such as Staten Island righthander Adam Warren and Batavia outfielder Kyle Conley, plus redshirt juniors such as Mahoning Valley outfielder Jason Kipnis and Lowell righty Alex Wilson—dominated the league. It all made for an unusual mix on our NY-P Top 20 list.

1. Ryan Westmoreland, of, Lowell (Red Sox)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Drafted: Red Sox '08 (5)
The Red Sox signed Westmoreland away from a Vanderbilt commitment for $2 million in 2008, but he didn't make his pro debut until this summer in Lowell because he had a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder. Offseason surgery limited him to DH duty until mid-August, and he played eight games in left field before running into a wall and breaking his collarbone on Aug. 28. The injury didn't affect his shoulder, and he was scheduled to resume workouts by the end of the yearr.

Even before he moved to the outfield, Westmoreland dazzled league managers and scouts with his multitool potential and polish.

"Hands down, he stands far and away ahead of the rest of the league," a National League scout said. "He's a big-time raw tools guy but he's got a good approach, a good path to the ball, good bat speed and everything's pretty clean. He puts on a show in batting practice, but he isn't just a dead-pull guy: They pitched him away, he'd drive it away."

Westmoreland is a plus-plus runner with average to plus raw power and a chance to be an above-average lefthanded hitter. He's a gifted athlete who profiles as a good center fielder once he regains the average to plus arm strength he showed in high school, and his recovery went well enough this summer that the Red Sox were planning to put him in center before he broke his clavicle. His size, instincts and maturity all stood out.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
223 38
66 15 3 7 35 38
49 19 0 .296 .401 .484
 
2. Alexander Colome, rhp, Hudson Valley (Rays)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 184 Age: 20 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
After going 0-5, 6.80 at Rookie-level Princeton in 2008, Colome was one of the biggest surprises in the NY-P this summer, leading the league in strikeouts (94 in 76 innings) and finishing second in ERA (1.66). He had the best combination of performance and projection of any pitcher in the league.

"He's the ultimate competitor," Hudson Valley manager Brady Williams said. "He doesn't like to get hit and he's got a very strong presence about him on the mound. With his stuff, he's dominating with his fastball and curveball."

The nephew of big league reliever Jesus Colome, Alexander attacks hitters with a lively 92-94 mph fastball that touches 95-96, even deep into outings. He complements it with a 78-80 mph curveball with sharp, late 11-to-5 break. He's working on a changeup to use against lefthanders, and it has excellent movement at times, but he has a tendency to throw it too hard and still is developing feel for the pitch.

Colome has a loose, easy arm action and is very tough to hit when he stays within himself, but sometimes he overthrows, causing his command to waver. If he learns to trust his stuff, he could develop into a frontline starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
15
15 7 4 0 1.66
76
46 22 14 0 32 94 .174
 
3. Arodys Vizcaino, rhp, Staten Island (Yankees)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 189 Age: 18 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
Vizcaino was the centerpiece of the Yankees' 2007 international crop, and his $800,000 bonus was the highest given to any pitcher on the international market that year. He dominated much older competition in the NY-P as an 18-year-old this summer.

Vizcaino isn't tall, but he has plenty of projection thanks to a loose, electric arm and a clean delivery. He already pitches at 90-94 mph and touches 96, and it's easy to see him throwing harder.

"Even the breaking ball comes out of his hand easy. It's a downer at 77-79, and it looks like there's a lot more in there," Jamestown manager Andy Haines said. "He has a pretty good feel for pitching, and he's a strike-thrower."

Vizcaino could have a plus curveball to go with a plus-plus fastball down the road, but he'll need to develop his changeup to thrive in a starting role. He also needs to improve his mound presence, as he tends to get rattled with runners on base, affecting his control.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
10
10 2 4 0 2.13
42
34 18 10 2 15 52 .211
 
4. Sebastian Valle, c, Williamsport (Phillies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 170 Age: 19 Signed: Mexico '06
Valle started 2008 by hitting .217 against much older competition in the low Class A South Atlantic League, but he ranked sixth in the NY-P with an .866 OPS after he was sent down to Williamsport. He stands out most for his bat, though multiple managers said he improved significantly behind the plate as the season progressed.

"He's a young, 19-year-old kid learning how to catch, and he's come a long way," Williamsport manager Chris Truby said. "His receiving and blocking have come along well, and he's starting to throw better, which is encouraging. At times he shows arm strength. He just needs more polish."

Valle is an aggressive hitter with average power potential and a mature approach for his age, though he struck out three times as much as he walked at his two minor league stops this year. He shows good pitch recognition and uses the right-center gap well, and he also can turn on pitches over the inner half.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
192 25 59 15 5 6 40 10 41 0 0 .307 .335 .531
 
5. Jason Kipnis, of, Mahoning Valley (Indians)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 5-10 Wt.: 175 Age: 22 Drafted: Indians '09 (2)
After a redshirt year and a rocky freshman season at Kentucky, Kipnis transferred to Arizona State and slugged 30 homers over his next two seasons. He earning first-team All-America honors as a junior this spring, when he led a young Sun Devils team to the College World Series. He followed that up by carrying Mahoning Valley to the NY-P finals, standing out in all phases of the game, especially with his bat.

"That swing is going to play," Haines said. "It's loose, it's in the zone a long time. I like that swing."

The undersized Kipnis doesn't fit a typical profile, but he laces hard line drives to all fields and has average power potential in his lefthanded stroke. He has a patient, mature approach at the plate and is a savvy baserunner with slightly above-average speed.

Kipnis played center field for Arizona State but slid to left for much of this summer in deference to Jordan Henry. Kipnis doesn't quite have the range for center in the big leagues and his arm is fringy. He'll have to hit a lot to stick as an everyday left fielder, but his solid overall package and excellent instincts help his cause.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
111 19 34 8 3 1 19 15 18 3 3 .306 .388 .459
 
6. Victor Black, rhp, State College (Pirates)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 185 Age: 21 Drafted: Pirates '09 (1s)
Black always showed electric arm strength at Dallas Baptist but struggled with his command and consistency in his first two seasons. He was better as a junior in 2009, and the Pirates signed him for a $717,000 bonus as a supplemental first-round pick. Pittsburgh kept him on a strict pitch count at State College, limiting him to no more than three innings in an outing, but he dominated with two above-average pitches at times.

Black throws downhill with a plus fastball that ranges from 91-95 mph, and he could throw harder as he grows into his 6-foot-4, 185-pound frame. He flashes a wipeout 82-84 mph slider with good depth, though it can be inconsistent.

At this stage, Black profiles best in the back of a bullpen, though he has a changeup that shows promise at times. He sometimes struggles to repeat his delivery, which negatively affects his command, but he usually can regroup. He's muscular and strong, but his delivery has some effort and he needs to incorporate his legs better.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
7
1 2 1 3.45
31
26 17 12 0 15 33 .213
 
7. Ramon Benjamin, lhp, Jamestown (Marlins)
B-T: R-L Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 180 Age: 22 Signed: Dominican Republic '06
After a strong U.S. debut in 2007, Benjamin missed all of 2008 following shoulder surgery but bounced back strong in this summer, showing power stuff and improved feel for pitching. He continued to overpower hitters after a promotion to low Class A Greensboro, posting a 1.00 ERA in six relief appearances.

Benjamin works comfortably at 92-94 mph and touches 95 with a fastball that has late life down in the zone. His 82-84 mph slider has sharp three-quarters break and is a swing-and-miss pitch against lefthanders and righthanders. Because he lacks a third pitch, he profiles as a late-innings reliever.

He had a tendency to fly open in his delivery in the past, but Benjamin worked hard with Jammers pitching coach Doc Watson to improve his alignment, resulting in better command.

"In the past the command has not been there, and now he's just a legitimate strike-thrower," Haines said. "He's good against righthanded hitters and lefties—he's not just a left-on-left guy. He just became a pitcher. It was fun to watch."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
18
0 1 1 0 3.77
29
25 12 12 1 11 31 .243
 
8. Arquimedes Caminero, rhp, Jamestown (Marlins)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 185 Age: 22 Signed: Dominican Republic '05
After three years in the Rookie-level Dominican Summer League, Caminero posted a 1.56 ERA in the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League in 2008 and earned a taste of the NY-P at the end of that summer. He returned to Jamestown in 2009 and dominated, though he didn't fare as well as Benjamin following a promotion to Greensboro.

Caminero is big and physical, and he overpowers hitters with a blazing 95-98 mph fastball. The pitch has explosive life up in the zone.

"He's got off-the-charts arm strength," Truby said. "It's just a power fastball, and you can see that his breaking ball is going to get better. It's a power slider and I saw the makings of a good pitch there."

Caminero's 85-87 mph slider has good depth and eats up righthanders when he commands it, but his feel for the pitch comes and goes. In his last three outings for Jamestown, he also had success throwing an 82-83 mph changeup to lefties, but it's still a work in progress. He has an aggressive mentality that's well suited for the bullpen, but he struggles with runners on base because his delivery tends to get overly complicated.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
15
0 3 1 0 3.00
24
19 9 8 1 16 42 .218
 
9. Alex Wilson, rhp, Lowell, (Red Sox)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 205 Age: 22 Drafted: Red Sox '09 (2)
Wilson had Tommy John surgery after two dominating seasons for Winthrop, which led him to sit out 2008 after transferring to Texas A&M. He showed power stuff early this spring for the Aggies before seeing his velocity decline in the weeks before the draft, but he rebounded at Lowell, where the Red Sox limited him to three innings per start.

"I like him a ton," Oneonta manager Howard Bushong said. "He works quick, gets after it, and he was 91-95 the last time we saw him. Everything stays down in the zone, and he's got a pretty dang good slider."

Wilson pounded the strike zone with his fastball this summer, though he has a max-effort delivery and throws every heater as hard as he can in short stints. His slider rates as average to plus, and he can throw it for strikes or as a chase pitch. His bulldog mentality, power two-pitch repertoire and delivery all point to a future in the bullpen.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
13 0 1 0 0.50
36
10 3 2 0 7 33 .085
 
10. Kyle Lobstein, lhp, Hudson Valley (Rays)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 200 Age: 20 Drafted: Rays '09 (1s)
Lobstein's stock soared on the showcase circuit before his senior year of high school, but his velocity dipped the following spring and he slipped to the 47th overall pick. The Rays signed him for $1.5 million and sent him to Hudson Valley for his pro debut this summer. He ranked fifth in the NY-P in strikeouts (74 in 73 innings) and eighth in ERA (2.58).

Lobstein sat around 87-88 mph as a high school senior but worked in the 89-90 range at times this summer, topping out at 91 occasionally. Other times, he worked at 85-88. His fastball plays up because of its life and deception.

"It comes out of his hand so easy, and it looks like he's not throwing hard, but then the ball's on you," Williams said. "His windup motion is pretty slow and easy, there's nothing violent about it, and then at the last second it's out of his hand with some giddy-up."

Lobstein's size, clean arm action and textbook delivery suggest projection, but some scouts think his mechanics are too manufactured and that he'll never have better than an average fastball. He's always around the plate with three pitches, and his 78-79 mph downer curveball is a solid-average offering. His changeup could develop into an average pitch.

He shows little emotion on the mound, and some evaluators are turned off by Lobstein's body language.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
14 3 5
0 2.58
73
55 23 21 4 23 74 .204
 
11. Anthony Hewitt, 3b, Williamsport (Phillies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 190 Age: 20 Drafted: Phillies '08 (1)
Hewitt climbed into the first round of the 2008 draft based on his supreme athleticism and enormous raw tools, but the Phillies knew he would be a long-term project. He remains extremely unpolished in all phases of the game, and he struck out once every three at-bats this summer—though that's actually an improvement from his pro debut in the GCL last year, when he whiffed every 2.1 at-bats.

"He has tremendous tools, light-tower power," Truby said. "He hit some balls a long way this year, as far as I've ever seen balls hit. It's just about having a consistent approach. He's done better. He's had really good flashes and he knows what he needs to do."

Hewitt did improve his approach and cut his stroke down, though his timing still needs work and his swing tends to be grooved. He has shown well above-average raw power in batting practice since his prep days, and he also has plus-plus arm strength and 65 speed underway, though he lacks first-step quickness. That's one reason he struggles mightily at third base, where he made 26 errors this summer.

Hewitt has stiff hands and simply lacks infield instincts, and the overwhelming sentiment in the NY-P was that he profiles better as a cannon-armed right fielder. In time, he could be a superstar, but it will take many minor league games  and there's no guarantee he's ever going to maximize his gargantuan potential.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
233 25 52 7 6 7 30 9 77 9 5 .223 .255 .395
 
12. Adam Warren, rhp, Staten Island (Yankees)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 200 Age: 22 Drafted: Yankees '09 (4)
Warren was a consummate winner at North Carolina, going 32-4 over his four-year career and pitching his best down the stretch of his senior year to climb into the fourth round of the draft. His polish and ability to command four pitches stood out in the NY-P, where he dominated less advanced competition.

"He's got pretty intense pitchability," an NL scout said. "He can battle, he can mix, and when he wants to, he can just step on it—93, 93, 94. He's a big kid and he's got velocity."

Warren pitches with an 88-92 mph fastball that features sink and armside run. He mixes in a solid-average changeup and two fringy breaking balls. He lacks a huge ceiling, but he's durable and athletic and should move quickly through the minors.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12 4 2 0 1.43
57
49 12 9
1 10 50 .236
 
13. Destin Hood, of, Vermont (Nationals)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 225 Age: 19 Drafted: Nationals '09 (2)
A two-sport standout in high school, Hood signed to play football (wide receiver) and baseball at Alabama, but the Nationals bought him out of that commitment with a $1.1 million bonus in 2008. His baseball instincts were raw when he entered pro ball, but he has made significant strides, even if his NY-P numbers were modest.

"The biggest thing about him is his ability to learn," Vermont manager Jeff Garber said. "Being a two-sport player, he made up a lot of ground in one year. The adjustments he's made to develop his swing and his ability to hit, he's grown a lot in that aspect. He's a strong kid with the capability to have big-time power and drive the ball."

Hood's swing is much more balanced than it was a year ago, and he does a considerably better job driving fastballs. He also made some progress recognizing offspeed pitches, but he has a long way to go in that area. He has a physical, athletic frame and very strong hands that translate to excellent bat speed. He projects to hit for plus power as he matures as a hitter. Most of his power is to the pull side currently, and he's learning to use the opposite field more.

Hood split time between left and right field at Vermont but projects as a left fielder because of his below-average arm, thought that also has shown improvement. He's an average runner who should have adequate outfield range as he improves his routes and becomes more aggressive defensively.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
138 12 34 4 1 2 24
11 45 2 1 .246 .302 .333
 
14. Jimmy Paredes, 2b, Staten Island (Yankees)
B-T: B-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 178 Age: 20 Signed: Dominican Republic '06
Perhaps it was inevitable for a young second baseman wearing pinstripes, but Paredes drew a few physical comparisons to a young Robinson Cano from NY-P managers. Paredes actually put up better numbers as a 19-year-old at Staten Island than Cano did in 2002, and he showed more speed than Cano ever has. He also was the NY-P all-star game MVP and batted .444 in the playoffs to lead Staten Island to the title.

A switch-hitter, Paredes has a good line-drive stroke from both sides of the plate. He hit .300 against lefthanders and .303 against righties this summer, though he slugged 174 points higher against southpaws. He flashes some pull power and could develop average pop as his strong frame matures. He doesn't take a lot of walks, but he does show some ability to work counts.

Paredes isn't a burner, but he's an aggressive baserunner with good speed. Defensively, he's not as fluid as Cano and needs to improve his footwork, particularly around the bag. His hands, actions and arm strength are certainly playable, and he could develop into a solid defender.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
205 36 62 8 4 2 17 10 30 23 9 .302 .336 .410
 
15. Derrik Gibson, ss/2b, Lowell (Red Sox)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 170 Age: 19 Drafted: Red Sox '08 (2)
The highest drafted player out of Delaware since Delino DeShields in 1989, Gibson turned down a scholarship from North Carolina when the Red Sox offered him $600,000 as a second-round pick a year ago. He earned comparisons to DeShields out of high school, but assessments of his speed this summer were mixed. Most observers graded him as a plus runner, but others timed him at 4.4 seconds from the right side of the plate to first, which rates as below average.

Either way, Gibson is an excellent baserunner who's 44-for-49 in stolen bases over his two pro seasons. His speed will be a crucial tool for him as he climbs the ladder, because he lacks strength and never figures to hit for power. He does have a mature, patient offensive approach and the ability to make consistent contact, and he could be an average or slightly better hitter as he gets stronger. He led the league with 54 runs scored.

Gibson alternated between shortstop and second base at Lowell, but his arm is fringy at short and he profiles better at second. He has good actions and enough range to be a quality defender there.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
255 54 74 15 4 0 25 39 42 28 5 .290 .395 .380
 
16. Leando Castro, of, Williamsport (Phillies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 175 Age: 20 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
The Phillies skipped Castro a level to low Class A Lakewood to open 2009, but he was sent back to extended spring training after batting .152. He regrouped nicely as a 20-year-old at Williamsport, leading the NY-P in hits (81) and extra-base hits (31) while earning plaudits from managers for his all-around game and intensity.

"He's high-energy, he can run, he can do a lot of things," Truby said. "For me he's an exciting player, and he's only going to get better. He's got a lot of tools to play with."

Castro isn't overly physical but has plus bat speed and could hit for fringe-average power as he matures. He's currently a gap-to-gap hitter with some pull power. He handles the bat well, showing the ability to bunt and to shorten up his swing and go the other way with two strikes.

Castro played all three outfield positions for the Crosscutters, and his solid range and average to plus arm equip him to handle all three. He has slightly above-average speed and is very aggressive on the basepaths—perhaps too aggressive, as he was thrown out nine times in 27 steal attempts this summer.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
256 48 81 19 5 7 43 13 49 18 9 .316 .351 .512
 
17. Kyle Conley, of, Batavia (Cardinals)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 209 Age: 22 Drafted: Cardinals '09 (7)
Conley established himself as one of college baseball's top power hitters at Washington, slugging 19 home runs in each of his junior and senior seasons to finish his career with 42, tied for the most in school history. The Cardinals signed him for $100,000 and sent him to low Class A Quad Cities, where he struggled for 15 games before heading to Batavia. He rebounded in a big way, posting a 1.204 OPS and finishing tied for second in the league with eight homers despite garnering just 109 at-bats.

"He's strong, he has bat speed, execution—he hit everything hard," an NL scout said. "He has a real simple approach, just one of those guys that is on time, his hands get through. He finds a way to get the barrel on it, doesn't overswing and has a good path with some bat speed. That's all it takes."

Big and physical, Conley has plus power mostly to his pull side, though he also can hit hard line drives the other way. He moves around well for his size, and his fringe-average speed makes him an adequate defender in left field, though his arm is below average. He has enough pop to hit his way to the big leagues despite being anchored to left.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
109 21 42 16 0 8 23
13 20 2 3 .385 .452 .752
 
18. Neil Medchill, of, Staten Island (Yankees)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 220 Age: 22 Drafted: Yankees '09 (11)
Medchill socked 25 home runs in two years at Oklahoma State and signed for $125,000 as a fourth-year junior in 2009. He kept on mashing in his pro debut, leading the league in homers (14) and slugging percentage (.551).

Medchill's best tool is his raw lefthanded power, which rates as a 70 on the 20-80 scouting scale. He has a big, strong frame and an upright stance, and he doesn't get cheated when he swings. His approach could use some refinement and he can be pitched to, as he sometimes struggles against southpaws and good fastballs.

"I really liked the bat," Haines said. "I was coaching in college when Adam Lind was at South Alabama, and he reminded me of that. He has a pure lefthanded swing, the bat stays in the zone, and he has power to all fields the way Lind did."

Like Lind, who tore up the NY-P in his 2004 pro debut, Medchill will be limited to left field, though he's a better athlete than Lind and moves fairly well for his size. He also has an average arm.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
216
42
60 13 2 14 41 24 66 7 2 .278 .350
.551
 
19. Michael Almanzar, 3b, Lowell (Red Sox)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 190 Age: 18 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
The son of former big league righthander Carlos Almanzar, Michael signed in 2007 for $1.5 million, the largest bonus netted by any international signee that year. After hitting just .207/.261/.293 in 49 games at low Class A Greenville to start 2009, he was sent down to Lowell, where he fared little better. He still stood out with his athletic, projectable frame and easy raw power, though he's still learning to unlock it in games.

Almanzar needs to shorten his swing and improve his plate discipline, but he has plus power potential and the bat speed to develop into an average or better hitter with time. He has a strong arm at third base and he moves well, but his throws are erratic and his hands are suspect. Multiple managers said they were turned off by his attitude, particularly his seeming lack of interest in playing defense.

"He's got a lot of ability, but he plays the game like it's Sunday afternoon," one manager said. "Maybe it's because the game comes easy to him. I don't think he quite understands the game yet. He needs to learn a lot."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
222 29 51 7 3 1 29 16 52 1 2 .230 .288 .302
 
20. Jim Fuller, lhp, Brooklyn (Mets)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 5-10 Wt.: 180 Age: 22 Drafted: Mets '08 (21)
Fuller signed as a draft-eligible sophomore despite slipping to the 21st round in 2008, and he dominated in 18 innings (mostly in relief) for Brooklyn in his pro debut. Still, the Mets sent him back to the Cyclone to work as a starter—a role in which he thrived in college.

Fuller worked mostly at 88-91 mph at Southern Connecticut State, but he sat at 89-92 and repeatedly touched 94 this summer. Though he's just 5-foot-10, he has broad shoulders, a strong frame and a quick arm. He complements his fastball with an average 78-81 mph changeup, a fringy 73-76 mph curveball and an occasional 78-80 mph slider.

"He was dominating when I saw him, throwing downhill with life on everything," an American League scout said. "He has real good stuff, good arm action. He'll pitch in the big leagues.

"He's a perfect long guy, and he could also come in to get out a lefty. He's a lefty with a plus fastball, with some breaking stuff and a ton of pitchability. He's not a monster, but he's got enough stuff to be a fifth starter, and he competes."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
11 3 6 0 2.86
63
58 24 20 4 15 67
.250