League Top 20 Prospects

Pioneer League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports

Wil Myers' big bat impresses in short stint with Chukars




FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. Chris Nelson, ss, Casper (Rockies)
2. *Blake DeWitt, 3b, Ogden (Dodgers)
3. *Sean Rodriguez, ss, Provo (Angels)
4. *Billy Butler, 3b, Idaho Falls (Royals)
5. Ray Liotta, lhp, Great Falls (White Sox)
6. *Scott Elbert, lhp, Ogden (Dodgers)
7. Cory Dunlap, 1b, Ogden (Dodgers)
8. Sam Deduno, rhp, Casper (Rockies)
9. Luis Cota, rhp, Idaho Falls (Royals)
10. *Seth Smith, of, Casper (Rockies)
*Has played in major leagues
The Pioneer League's season stretched to Sept. 11, making it anywhere from 10 days to two weeks longer than any other Rookie-level circuit. The quirky schedule gave several premium 2009 draft picks who signed near the Aug. 17 deadline enough time to qualify for this list, including Idaho Falls catcher Wil Myers (who ranked No. 1) and Missoula's duo of third baseman Bobby Borchering and shortstop Chris Owings.

The league benefited from the Angels' and Diamondbacks' surfeit of draft picks this June, as the two clubs combined to send 10 players selected in the top five rounds directly to Orem and Missoula. Righthander Garrett Richards and lefties Pat Corbin and Tyler Kehrer anchored an Owlz rotation that posted a composite 3.83 ERA, lowest in the league. The Osprey nearly put their entire infield on this Top 20 list, with second baseman David Nick joining Borchering and Owings and first baseman Paul Goldschmidt, who tied for the league lead with 18 homers.

Orem and Missoula met in the league finals, with the more experienced Owlz winning the series two games to one.

In most years, a second-round pedigree would mean automatic entry on our Pioneer League Top 20, but that wasn't the case this summer. Helena second baseman Cutter Dykstra and catcher Cameron Garfield, Ogden outfielder Blake Smith and Missoula righthander Eric Smith all missed the cut. Dykstra was a 2008 pick who had shifted from center field, while the other three were 2009 selections.

Another player who missed out was Ogden outfielder Brian Cavazos-Galvez, the league MVP and leader in runs (59), hits (97), doubles (29), homers (18) and extra-base hits (50). Some observers thought more advanced pitchers would be able to exploit his aggressive approach and long swing.

1. Wil Myers, c, Idaho Falls (Royals)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 190 Age: 18 Drafted: Royals '09 (3)
One of the steadiest high school bats available in this year's draft, Myers got $2 million as a third-round pick, pulling down a higher bonus than 16 of the 30 first-rounders who signed. Despite a late start, he made a huge impression by ripping 12 extra-base hits in 18 games and throwing out five of the 11 basestealers who tested him.

Myers' offense is ahead of his defense at this point. He uses no batting gloves or finger tape, trusting his quick hands and strong wrists to hit with authority. One manager said Myers seemingly could flick at the ball and hit it hard. Even mid-90s velocity didn't seem to bother him as a pro, as he showed plus bat speed in driving the ball to all fields.

Myers' strong, projectable frame and leverage should lead to well above-average power down the line. His athleticism and smooth, repeatable swing suggest he'll also hit for average.

Also a third baseman and pitcher in high school, Myers isn't always fluid behind the plate but has easy arm strength and the potential to be an average receiver. With time, his blocking and pitch framing should improve because his baseball instincts are strong.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
68 18 29 7 1 4 14 9
15 2 0 .426 .488 .735
 
2. Jake Odorizzi, rhp, Helena (Brewers)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Drafted: Brewers '08 (1s)
The 32nd overall pick in 2008, Odorizzi has spent his first two pro seasons in Rookie ball. That's not a reflection on his ability, because he has everything desired in a high school pitcher: a plus fastball, a chance for two average secondary pitches and a free and easy delivery. A natural athlete who also excelled in football as an amateur, he has room to fill out his lean 6-foot-2, 180-pound frame and add velocity.

Odorizzi works downhill from a three-quarters arm slot, with his fastball ranging from 87-91 mph and touching 93 with sink and life to his arm side. He maintains his velocity deep into starts. Because he stays balanced and gets nice extension in his delivery, his heater gets on batters quickly.

Odorizzi flashes a plus curveball, featuring occasional tight, late break, but it backs up on him too often at this stage. He mixes in a few sliders for variety and has inconsistent feel for his changeup.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
10 1 4 0 4.40
47
55 27 23 3 9 43 .296
 
3. Bobby Borchering, 3b, Missoula (Diamondbacks)
B-T: B-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 195 Age: 18 Drafted: Diamondbacks '09 (1)
Taken 16th overall in June, Borchering was the highest drafted player to play in the Pioneer League. He signed for $1.8 million just ahead of the deadline and didn't hit much during the regular season. But his bat came alive in the playoffs, when he hit .321 with seven extra-base hits and 10 RBIs in six games.

An imposing 6-foot-4, Borchering hits for power from both sides of the plate. His plus bat speed and fluid swing will enable him to hit for average, while his strong hands and slight uppercut should translate into above-average power. Borchering was especially strong from the left side in his debut, but he tended to chase pitches out of the zone because he was geared to hit fastballs. His long arms leave him susceptible to hard stuff in.

Borchering's agility and speed rate as below-average, and his hands are fringy. He committed five errors in 20 games at third base. He has a strong arm but will have to work hard to avoid a move across the diamond to first.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
87 10 21 8 1 2 11 5 27 0 0 .241 .290 .425
 
4. Garrett Richards, rhp, Orem (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 210 Age: 21 Drafted: Angels '09 (1s)
Richards' dominating results in his pro debut stood in stark contrast to his performance at Oklahoma, where he struggled to a 6.57 ERA in three years. The biggest difference was that he threw strikes, allowing his top-of-the-rotation potential to shine through.

Richards' fastball ranges from 90-96 mph and sits at 93-94, and he commands it down in the zone. He has a clean delivery and his heater seems to explode out of his hand, featuring average life and sink. He didn't allow a homer in 55 innings for Orem.

Richards throws an average-to-plus curveball with depth and tilt, while mixing in a solid-average, late-breaking slider that sits in the mid-80s. If that weren't enough, he also throws a fading, sinking changeup that's a plus pitch at times and helps keep lefthanders in check. If be can build on his Pioneer League performance, he'll represent incredible value as the 2009 draft's 42nd overall pick.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
8
3 1 0 1.53
35
37 6 6 0 4
30 .278
 
5. Pat Corbin, lhp, Orem (Angels)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 165 Age: 20 Drafted: Angels '09 (2)
Tall and thin at 6-foot-3 and 175 pounds, Corbin played baseball and basketball at Mohawk Valley (N.Y.) CC before transferring to Chipola (Fla.) JC, where he focused on pitching and emerged as a second-round pick in June. He can dunk a basketball from a standstill, and his premium athleticism and loose arm portend more velocity down the road.

Corbin's fastball currently ranges from 88-93 mph, sitting at 90-91 with natural sink and either tailing or cutting action. He's around the plate, but his command in the zone suffers because he often can't predict how his fastball will behave.

Corbin throws a hard slurve that's 75-82 mph and sometimes features sharp, deep tilt. His clean arm stroke allowed him to take to a changeup quickly, and it showed flashes of being a plus pitch by the end of the season. He projects a quiet confidence on the mound and has shown a willingness to pitch in on righthanders.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
12 4 2 0 5.05
46
59 34 26 6 11 46 .291
 
6. Jean Segura, 2b, Orem (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 155 Age: 19 Signed: Dominican Republic '07
Signed out of the Dominican in 2007, Segura had his U.S. debut last year marred by an infield collision that resulted in a broken ankle and a pin being inserted in the bone. More bad luck followed this year, when Segura's season ended Aug. 5 when he broke a finger sliding headfirst into second base. But the injuries can't mute Segura's intriguing blend of tools.

"He may be the best position player prospect in the league," Orem manager Tom Kotchman said. "He has enough athleticism to play next to [Angels shortstop Erick] Aybar one day."

Though he's listed at 5-foot-11 and 165 pounds, Segura appears strong and not skinny. His righthanded swing is quick and short to the ball. He excels at making contact, hits line drives to all fields and projects to have average power for a middle infielder. A plus-plus runner with powerful legs, he projects as a top-of-the-order hitter.

Despite his speed, Segura's range and defensive instincts are a bit short. He's limited to second base, where his arm is above-average for the position. Observers thought he showed an overly emotional side that he figures to outgrow.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
162
33 56 10 4 3 21 83 11 11 3 .346 .392 .512
 
7. Chris Owings, ss, Missoula (Diamondbacks)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 170 Age: 18 Drafted: Diamondbacks '09 (1s)
None of Owings' skills earmark him as a future star, but the teenage shortstop has a chance for solid-average tools across the board. He shot into the supplemental first round of the 2009 draft with with a strong senior season, signing for $950,000 in mid-August. Owings batted .345 with six extra-base hits and eight runs in six playoff games, helping Missoula push Orem to the limit.

Added strength has raised Owings' offensive profile, and he projects as a line-drive, doubles hitter. A righthanded batter, he's short to the ball and uses the whole field, so he has the tools to hit for average. He's an average runner.

In his debut, Owings featured solid actions, agility and body control at shortstop, making all the routine plays. He has a solid-average arm and gets good carry on his throws. He wasn't overwhelmed by the speed of the pro game and readily assumed a leadership role.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
108 20 33 5 1 2 10 3 25 3 0 .306 .324 .426
 
8. Nolan Arenado, 3b, Casper (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 205 Age: 18 Drafted: Rockies '09 (2)
The Rockies' absence of a complex league team didn't deter Arenado, their second-round pick from turning in a solid pro debut. He showed a mature, balanced approach from the right side and walked as often as he struck out. His bat speed and raw strength suggest potential plus home run power down the road, but for now he's a doubles hitter.

Arenado shifted from prep shortstop to pro third baseman, a better fit for his heavy feet and limited range. He has soft hands and plus arm strength, and league observers trusted that he'd work to make himself an average overall defender, noting his take-charge attitude on the infield.

"You know he wants the ball hit to him, and that's an intangible you can't teach," Casper manager Tony Diaz said. "He's going to achieve every ounce of potential given to him."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
203 28 61 15 0 2 22 16 18 5 2 .300 .351 .404
 
9. Chris Balcom-Miller, rhp, Casper (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 190 Age: 20 Drafted: Rockies '09 (6)
The league's pitcher of the year, Balcom-Miller drew a comparison with Jason Marquis for his athleticism, repertoire and bulldog mentality. As with Marquis, his key to success is a plus two-seam fastball that ranges form 89-93 mph and features plus sink and armside run. His herky-jerky delivery provides natural deception, and his two-seamer generates a lot of awkward swings and plenty of grounders.

Balcom-Miller shows advanced command and feel for pitching and is aggressive with his fastball, consistently working ahead of batters. His slider also rates as a plus pitch and gives him a weapon for the left side of the plate. His changeup was a fringe-average in his debut and it could be the separator between a career as a back-of-the-rotation starter or a quality reliever.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
11
11 4 0 0 1.58
57
37 13 10 3 10 60 .181
 
10. Eric Arnett, rhp, Helena (Brewers)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-5 Wt.: 230 Age: 21 Drafted: Brewers '09 (1)
The Brewers brought Arnett along slowly after making him just the second first-round pick ever from Indiana University. He completed five innings in only one of his 14 appearances, showing inconsistent velocity and command.

Arnett's arm strength is intriguing. A physical 6-foot-5, 230-pound righthander, he showed a 90-94 mph fastball with plus sink—but later in games he dipped into the high-80s. He works quickly, and his arm action is clean.

Arnett's mid-80s slider, his go-to strikeout pitch in college, showed tight rotation and bite, but he couldn't locate it consistently. It's a true plus offering when it's working, but he needs to maintain his arm slot. He also needs to refine his below-average changeup and his feel for pitching.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
9 0 4 0 4.41 35
33 30 17 1 21 35 .228
 
11. Yorman Rodriguez, of, Billings (Reds)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 180 Age: 17 Signed: Venezuela '08
Based purely on raw tools and ultimate ceiling, Rodriguez was the Pioneer League's most intriguing prospect. The league's youngest player, he played most of the season at age 16 after signing for a Venezuelan-record $2.5 million last August. He hit .310 with 10 extra-base hits in his first 19 games with Billings following a promotion from the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League, but he ended the season in a 9-for-67 (.134) skid and finished with poor overall numbers.

Rodriguez has the natural bat speed to hit for power, and he hit two of his three Pioneer League homers to the opposite field. His pitch-recognition skills are raw, however, and he's consistently lunging at breaking balls. Diaz said Rodriguez would benefit from committing to hitting up the middle and working on identifying breaking balls in batting practice.

"He's skinny as heck, so if he adds 50 pounds to his frame, maybe he'll hit some bombs," Diaz said. "At times, it looks like if you throw the rosin bag out there, he'll swing. At his age, he's just programmed to swing."

Rodriguez stood out defensively, with well above-average speed, strong instincts and good range in center field. He also has a strong arm that will serve him well in right field if he has to move after filling out physically. His big swing precludes him from getting out of the box quickly, but he has the speed to steal bases.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
183 21 40 10 2 3 17 9 61 5 2 .219 .259 .344
 
12. Mike Belfiore, lhp, Missoula (Diamondbacks)
B-T: R-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 200 Age: 20 Drafted: Diamondbacks (1s)
Belfiore served as first baseman and closer for Boston College, but because he's a 6-foot-3 lefty with low- to mid-90s heat and a fresh arm, it was easy for clubs to envision him as a starter in pro ball. The Diamondbacks selected him 45th overall and plugged him into the Missoula rotation.

Early in the summer, his fastball topped out at 93-94 mph with heavy sink, but he appeared gassed by the time the playoffs rolled around, sitting at 88-90. That's understandable given that he threw 48 innings this spring—and then another 68 as a pro, counting two postseason starts. Regardless, he allowed just two regular-season homers despite pitching in Missoula's cozy Ogren Park.

Belfiore struggled to command his secondary stuff, and some thought a stab in the back of his arm swing may have been the culprit. His diving changeup is a plus pitch at times, but he didn't throw it much. His 82-85 mph slider also has its moments and lacks consistency.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
11 2 2 0 2.17
58
59 29 14 2 13 55 .259
 
13. Tyler Kehrer, lhp, Orem (Angels)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 210 Age: 21 Drafted: Angels (1s)
Drafted 48th overall in June, Kehrer resembles fellow Angels premium picks Garrett Richards and Pat Corbin in that he possesses size, fluid mechanics and arm strength. His tailing, four-seam fastball sits in the low 90s and touches 96 mph, and the Orem staff also encouraged him to develop his two-seam fastball.

Unlike many college pitchers, Kehrer relies on his fastball at the expense of his breaking stuff. In his first start, Orem manager Tom Kotchman said Kehrer threw 24 straight heaters to begin the game.

Kehrer's secondary offerings are less refined, though his slider flashes plus potential with its occasional sharp, three-quarters break. It's an impressive pitch when on because it dives toward the ankles of righthanders, but when it's not, it backs up over the heart of the plate. He lacks feel for a changeup but has flashed a quality one in brief glimpses.

More thrower than pitcher now, Kehrer has erratic command. He sometimes flies open in his delivery, which leaves his pitches up in the zone.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
14
14 3 3 0 4.75
55
57 36 29 6 22 57 .266
 
14. Carlos Ramirez, c, Orem (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 205 Age: 21 Drafted: Angels '09 (8)
With a 5-foot-11, 205-pound body only Bengie Molina would envy, Ramirez doesn't look the part of typical prospect. But Kotchman credits the former Arizona State backstop, who signed in mid-July, as a key reason for the Owlz finishing with the league's best regular-season record and winning the playoffs.

Ramirez has hit everywhere he's played, and that trend continued in his pro debut. With a short swing and strike-zone awareness, he hit .376 (which would have won the league batting title if he hadn't fallen 15 plate appearances short) and had a .500 on-base percentage (that topped the league because he still would have finished first if he had gone 0-for-15). He has the bat, average power and intangibles to profiles as a regular catcher.

Ramirez called his own game in college and relished assuming a leadership role with Orem, developing a great rapport with his pitchers and taking pride in his knowing the strengths of each. Despite his well-below average speed and athleticism, he blocks and receives well.

Ramirez features an average arm with a quick release, typically completing throws to second base in 1.9-2.0 seconds. He threw out 32 percent of basestealers, slightly above the league average of 31 percent.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
149 34 56 18 0 7 36 35 26 0 0 .376 .500 .638
 
15. John Lamb, lhp, Idaho Falls (Royals)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 195 Age: 19 Drafted: Royals '08 (5)
No. 7 on our Rookie-level Appalachian League list, Lamb pitched impressively for an 18-year-old in a hostile pitcher's league. In consecutive August starts, he tossed 14 shutout innings against Great Falls, totaling 17 strikeouts, one walk and four hits allowed. A fifth-round pick a year ago, he recovered nicely from a fractured left elbow (sustained in a car accident) that wiped out his high school senior season.

Lamb delivers fastballs with precision from his clean, repeatable delivery. He ranges from 88-92 mph and pops a few 93s, working both sides of the plate like a veteran. His curveball and changeup are less refined, but both have flashed plus potential.

Even after the long layoff, he throws strikes with all his pitches. His arm action is clean and he has size and projection on his side. He may have been a bit underappreciated in a league that featured power-armed college lefties Corbin, Belfiore and Kehrer.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
8
8 3 1 0 3.70
41
33 20 17 4 11 46 .217
 
16. Brett Wallach, rhp, Ogden (Dodgers)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 180 Age: 20 Drafted: Dodgers '09 (3)
Wallach's father Tim played 17 years in the big leagues and managed the Dodgers' Triple-A Albuquerque affiliate in 2009. His brother Matt is a minor league catcher for the Dodgers too, and Brett joined the organization as a third-round pick after leading Orange Coast to the California community college title in the spring. Wallach pitched better in his pro debut that his 5.23 ERA suggests, striking out 38 in 31 innings.

At his best, Wallach pitches at 90-92 with sink, and his fastball ranges from 88-94. He also throws a hard slider with tilt and depth, as well as a workable changeup. Los Angeles is betting that his athleticism (he was Orange Coast's cleanup hitter and first baseman) and bloodlines will translate into mid-rotation potential.

Wallach pitched just two innings as a high school senior and served as a closer as a juco freshman, so his arm is fresh. He has a projectable 6-foot-2 frame and a clean delivery.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12 0 1 0 5.23
31
34 20 18 4 15 38 .279
 
17. Nick Bucci, rhp, Helena (Brewers)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 180 Age: 19 Drafted: Brewers '08 (18)
An 18th-round pick in 2008, Bucci entered the Pioneer League with little fanfare but made a name for himself. He ranked second in the league in wins (6-3), fourth in strikeouts (66 in 69 innings) and fifth in ERA (4.41). He also raised his profile by throwing five shutout innings to beat Korea in Canada's opener at the World Cup in September.

A live-bodied 6-foot-2, 180-pound righthander, Bucci throws downhill and gets good extension on a four-seam fastball that ranges from 88-92 mph and touches 93. He'll mix in a two-seamer occasionally. He works fast and aggressively attacks the strike zone, hiding the ball well in his delivery.

His hard 76-79 mph curveball is an average pitch, and his changeup has nice sink. Bucci has all the ingredients, including composure, needed to mature into a rotation candidate, most likely as a No. 4 or 5 starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
12
12 0 1 0 5.23
31
34 20 18 4 15 38 .279
 
18. Mariekson Gregorius, ss, Billings (Reds)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 160 Age: 19 Signed: Netherlands '08
Billings, the league's worst team, featured two of the better up-the-middle prospects, both products of the Reds' expanded international effort. A buzz followed Rodriguez into the league by virtue of his massive signing bonus. Gregorius, a shortstop from the Netherlands whose father Didi pitched in both the Dutch amateur and professional ranks, was much more anonymous.

The Reds called on Gregorius to fill in with high Class A Sarasota before the Pioneer League season began, and the 19-year-old held his own. He's wiry strong and in need of physical maturation, but he displayed knowledge of the strike zone and a spray-hitting approach. He runs well, showing consistent 4.06-second times from the left side of the plate to first base, but power won't be part of his toolset.

Gregorius has plenty of athleticism, soft hands and enough arm strength to remain shortstop. He has excellent body control, but he struggles at times with the footwork to make plays in the hole. A natural leader, he grew more confident as the season progressed.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
204
28
64 10 1 1 16 12 27 8 6 .314 .363
.387
 
19. David Nick, 2b, Missoula (Diamondbacks)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Drafted: Diamondbacks '09 (4)
None of Nick's tools projects to be better than average, but he's a pesky, instinctual player who could grind his way up the ladder. A fourth-round pick as a prep shortstop, he signed almost immediately and transitioned to second base.

Nick trusts his hands and has plenty of bat speed, but he opts to snap his bat through the zone instead of loading it first. This unorthodox approach turned off some observers. Regardless, he stays inside the ball well and lines it to all fields, and he has enough strength to hit for fringe-average power for a middle infielder.

An average runner who led the Osprey with 16 steals, Nick makes the routine plays at the keystone. Observers rated his defense from below-average to average. He turns the double-play pivot well, but his arm strength is nothing special and his footwork and arm action need refinement. Too often, he floats the ball to first base on throws.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
273 46 78 18 3 6 35 22 49 16 8 .286 .351 .440
 
20. Salvador Perez, c, Idaho Falls (Royals)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 175 Age: 19 Signed: Venezuela '06
Perez continued to catch semi-regularly even after Myers arrived in Idaho Falls at the end of August. Signed out of Venezuela after the 2006 season, Perez hit .361 in 25 Rookie-ball games last year, prompting an assignment to low Class A Burlington this April. He struggled in the cold Midwest League weather, batting .189 with little power in 36 games.

A return to the Pioneer League suited Perez, who showed off his solid hitting instincts, average overall defensive tools and strong leadership skills. He concentrates on making contact and likes to use the middle of the field. That approach figures to produce high averages and good strikeout-walk ratios, but not a whole lot of power.

Perez already stands 6-foot-3 and weights about 200 pounds, making him larger than the average catcher. One scout thought his actions were a bit stiff and projected him as a future backup. But Perez receives well and shows a quick transfer and plus arm strength, allowing him to throw out 33 percent of basestealers at Idaho Falls. His blocking is less refined.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
233 35 72 14 3 2 38 19 25 0 1 .309 .357 .421