League Top 20 Prospects

South Atlantic League Top 20 Prospects With Scouting Reports

Hitters are the story in the South Atlantic League




FIVE YEARS AGO
(Click here for the complete list)
1. *B.J. Upton, ss, Charleston (Devil Rays)
2. *Scott Kazmir, lhp, Capital City (Mets)
3. *Cole Hamels, lhp, Lakewood (Phillies)
4. *Jeff Francoeur, of, Rome (Braves)
5. *Jeremy Hermida, of, Greensboro (Marlins)
6. *Hanley Ramirez, ss, Augusta (Red Sox)
7. *Fausto Carmona, rhp, Lake County (Indians)
8. *Merkin Valdez, rhp, Hagerstown (Giants)
9. *Scott Olsen, lhp, Greensboro (Marlins)
10. *Mike Hinckley, lhp, Savannah (Expos)
*Has played in major leagues.
Youth was served throughout the South Atlantic League in 2008, a season in which teenage talent dominated the low Class A circuit more than at any time in recent memory. League champion Augusta set the tone, with 18-year-old lefthander Madison Bumgarner leading the minors in ERA (1.46), 17-year-old first baseman Angel Villalona topping the GreenJackets with 17 homers and 19-year-old second baseman Nick Noonan pacing the club with 68 RBIs. All three ranked among the SAL's top 10 prospects.

"I thought overall the talent in the league might have been a little down from top to bottom compared to recent seasons," Lakewood manager Steve Roadcap said. "But the number of 18- and 19-year-olds in the league with high ceilings was as impressive a group as I have seen."

"There were several young guys in this league that you're going to be seeing in the big leagues and having an impact up there," Rome manager Randy Ingle concurred. "And if I had to guess, I would think some of them will get there pretty fast."

A number of college first-round picks appeared in the SAL but didn't stay long enough to qualify for this list, most notably Kannapolis shortstop Gordon Beckham and Greenville righthander Daniel Bard. Another college first-rounder, Hickory righthander Brad Lincoln, did pitch enough innings. While he couldn't quite crack the Top 20, he did show that he's making a promising recovery from the Tommy John surgery that sidelined him for all of 2007.

1. Madison Bumgarner, lhp, Augusta (Giants)
B-T: R-L Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 215 Age: 19 Drafted: Giants '07 (1)
Madison Bumgarner
The league's youngest starting pitcher as well as its pitcher of the year, Bumgarner was the first name mentioned by every manager who saw him, and for good reason. After struggling with his revamped mechanics early in the season and surrendering 10 earned runs in his first 11 2/3 innings, the 10th overall pick from the 2007 draft returned to his high school delivery and didn't allow an earned run in his next four starts. Not only did he lead the minors in ERA, but he also won his both playoff starts while permitting just one unearned run in 14 innings.

"He's the most advanced pitcher I have ever seen at his age," Augusta manager Andy Skeels said. "His makeup is impressive, and he has every physical tool you could hope to have. He's the real deal, a true No. 1 starter at the major league level."

Bumgarner works with a fastball that sits at 94-95 mph and an ever-improving breaking ball and changeup. He pounds both sides of the plate and changes the batter's eye level with his ability to hit his spots with precision. He challenges hitters and exhibits a killer instinct on the mound.

"The way the ball comes out of his hand is incredible," Lexington manager Gregg Langbehn said. "We saw him early in the season and then late in the year. The second time, it wasn't much of a contest. He absolutely dominated us, especially with his ability to command his pitches on the inside part of the plate."

G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
24
24
15 3
0 1.46
142 111 28 23 3
21 164 .216
 
2. Jason Heyward, of, Rome (Braves)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 220 Age: 19 Drafted: Braves '07 (1)
The 14th overall pick in the 2007 draft, Heyward was tabbed as the league's best batting prospect and most exciting player but the managers and was named the most outstanding prospect on the SAL's year-end all-star team. What's more, he finished third in the league in batting average (.323), fourth in on-base percentage (.388) and fifth in runs scored (88). And he accomplished most of this before turning 19 in August

"You consider where he hit in the lineup [third] and the numbers he put up, it's pretty phenomenal," Ingle said. "He's quiet, and nothing really upsets him. He goes about his business the same way every day. You watch him and talk to him and you come away knowing the only thing on his mind is working as hard as he can to be a major league player."

Scouts love Heyward's 6-foot-5, 220-pound frame. With his sweet lefthanded swing that projects to produce significant power numbers, he attracts comparisons to a young Dave Parker. He gets good jumps on balls in right field and has plenty of arm strength and accuracy to man the position at the major league level.

Speed is his only tool that's not deemed above average, but he moves well for a big man and is a smart, aggressive baserunner.

"He's so professional in the way he plays the game," Columbus manager Matt Quatraro said. "He's not out there trying to impress anyone during B.P. He's working on using his hands and driving the ball to the opposite field. He has major leaguer written all over him."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
449 88 145 27 6 11 52 49 74 15 3 .323 .388 .483
 
3. Mike Stanton, of, Greensboro (Marlins)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-5 Wt.: 205 Age: 18 Drafted: Marlins '07 (2)
The ball may fly out of Greensboro's NewBridge Bank Park, but most of the 21 homers that the sculptured Stanton crushed there would have cleared the fences in any ballpark. He also added 18 on the road to rank second overall in the minors, easily leading the SAL in homers, extra-base hits (68), total bases (286) and slugging percentage (.611). He was overmatched in his pro debut last year and most observers believe his numbers will improve once he smoothes some of the rough edges to his game.

A three-sport standout in high school, Stanton has succeeded with his raw strength and should make even more progress as he learns to use his hands at the plate. He also moved from right field to center during the season and showed plus range, speed and arm strength to go with solid instincts and an outstanding work ethic. More than a few managers said Stanton reminded them of Dave Winfield.

"After watching his Scouting Bureau tape to where he is now, the progress is incredible," Greenville manager Kevin Boles said. "He has tremendous upside, particularly with his body and his athleticism. The improvements he made from the beginning of the season to the end of the year, boy, the Marlins have the most exciting everyday player in the league. He is fun to watch."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
468 89 137 26 3 39
97 58 153 4 2 .293 .381 .611
 
4. Jhoulys Chacin, rhp, Asheville (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 168 Age: 20 Signed: Venezuela '04
When Bumgarner was struggling during the first two weeks of the season, Chacin received much of the attention as the league's top pitcher. He tossed 14 scoreless innings in his first two starts and went 10-1, 1.86 before earning a promotion to the high Class A California League, where he continued to excel. He led the minors with 18 victories.

Chacin's fastball resides at 93-94 mph, but what makes him so effective this year is the quality of his secondary pitches. His changeup is a plus offering with good fade and tumbling movement, and he has so much confidence in it that he'll throw it at any time in the count. His 12-to-6 overhand curveball remains a work in progress, but he had more success with it when he employed it more often.

Chacin also has an excellent downhill plane in his delivery, uses the inside part of the plate to his advantage and isn't afraid to challenge hitters.

"I can see him pitching for a long time," Quatraro said. "He really knows what he's doing, and he has three or four pitches with pretty easy actions. He has a big frame and looks like he could be a workhorse in the middle of the rotation."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
16 16 10 1 0 1.86 111 82 30 23 3 30 98 .205
 
5. Matt Dominguez, 3b, Greensboro (Marlins)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 180 Age: 19 Drafted: Marlins '07 (1)
Dominguez missed the first six weeks of the season with mononucleosis, and it took him a while to regain his strength as well as the 15 pounds he lost during his illness. Once he did, the 12th overall pick in the 2007 draft showed stellar defensive abilities as well as the ability to hit for average and power.

His bat was somewhat of a question, both prior to the 2007 draft and again after he hit .158 in his pro debut. Dominguez erased many of those doubts with his easy bat speed, fluid swing and impressive hands, which enabled him to rank fourth in the league in slugging percentage (.499). Greensboro manager Edwin Rodriguez actually compares Dominguez's stance to Babe Ruth's.

Dominiguez also maintained his reputation as a stellar defender. The only thing he doesn't do well is run.

"He makes plays to his left as well as anyone I've seen at this level," Langbehn said. "He has real soft hands. And his bat plays. He has a little bit of an inside-out swing, and he needs to make the adjustment with fastballs in, but he showed me the ability to hit."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
345
59 102 16 0
18 70
28 68 0 1 .296 .354 .499
 
6. Angel Villalona, 1b, Augusta (Giants)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 200 Age: 18 Signed: Dominican Republic '06
No player received more mixed reports from managers and scouts than Villalona. Signed for $2.1 million out of the Dominican Republic, Villalona made a seamless defensive move from third base to first base and showed tremendous raw hitting ability. But several observers questioned Villalona's conditioning and weight, which was listed at 240 pounds.

As the season progressed, it was obvious that the assistance provided by Augusta trainer Eric Ortega was producing results. His power this year was only the tip of the iceberg, and his hitting will improve once he gets a better grasp of the strike zone. He was the league's youngest player and also the youngest at the Futures Game.

"He looked a lot better during the second half of the season than he did early," Quatraro said. "He's lost a lot of weight, and it's going to take time to see if he is going to adjust to hitting the breaking ball."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
464 64 122 29 0 17 64
18 118 1 2 .263 .312 .435
 
7. Jesus Montero, c, Charleston (Yankees)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 225 Age: 18 Signed: Venezuela '06
There are a lot of similarities between Villalona and Montero, who signed for $1.6 million out of Venezuela in 2006. Both are primarily offensive players whose approach to the game can be questionable at times, but both were very young for the league and have undeniably high ceilings. Montero also earned a spot in the Futures Game, led the SAL in hits (171) and placed second in batting (.326).

"He's got a real good approach at the plate and power to all fields," Asheville manager Joe Mikulik said. "He hit home runs to left, center and right against us. I didn't see him catch and throw as well as I would have liked, but his offensive approach at his age is solid for this league."

Montero is likely to continue to don the tools of ignorance for the immediate future, but he's more likely to reach Yankee Stadium as a first baseman or left fielder. He has more athleticism than most 6-foot-4, 225-pounders, but he's already huge for a catcher and still growing. His arm strength is decent, but he threw out just 25 percent of SAL basestealers.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
525
86 171 34 1 17 87 37 83 2 1 .326 .376 .491
 
8. Austin Romine, c, Charleston (Yankees)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 210 Age: 19 Drafted: Yankees '07 (2)
He battled a groin injury early in the year and split time behind the plate with Montero, but once Romine settled in and got healthy, he emerged as the SAL's most promising defensive catcher. He also hit .359 with four of his 10 homers in August.

"He came the farthest of any player we had this year," Charleston manager Torre Tyson said. "He was overshadowed by Montero somewhat, but he really grew over the course of the season. You could see everything starting to click for him. He's got a chance to be an excellent defensive catcher with a chance to hit for power."

Romine made significant strides with his footwork and his ability to call games and work with pitchers. He showed a plus arm and had pop times under 1.8 seconds, yet erased only 20 percent of basestealers. Offensively, he makes consistent contact and should have at least gap power.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
407 66 122 24 1 10 49 25 26 3 0 .300 .344 .437
 
9. Nick Noonan, 2b, Augusta (Giants)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 180 Age: 19 Drafted: Giants '07 (1s)
With a sweet swing from the left side that produces line drives to all fields, Noonan had more offensive potential than any SAL middle infielder. He showed sound offensive mechanics and the ability to make adjustments despite being young for the league, though his plate discipline slipped from his pro debut.

"He has a very sound approach at the plate," Hickory manager Gary Green said. "He drives the ball and he's going to hit for more power as he gets stronger and adds experience. He made all the routine plays at second and turns the double play. He's an ideal guy to have there at second base."

A shortstop in high school, Noonan wanted to remain at the position but is a better fit at second base, particularly with teammate Charlie Culberson's defensive skills at short. The shift should become easier with time for Noonan, who isn't quite fluid yet at second. He has above-average athleticism and runs well, as evidenced by his 29 steals in 33 attempts.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
499 79 139 27 7
9 68 23 98 29 4 .279 .315 .415
 
10. Freddie Freeman, 1b, Rome (Braves)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-5 Wt.: 220 Age: 18 Drafted: Braves '07 (2)
Freeman was the youngest player drafted in 2007 and played his first full pro season at 18. His disciplined approach at the plate far exceeded his age and enabled him to finish second in the league in slugging percentage (.521) and fourth in batting (.316), hits (155), extra-base hits (58) and RBIs (95).

Freeman also starred defensively. He has quick feet and reactions around the bag, and Ingle said Freeman saved countless runs with his glovework. He also throws well for a first baseman—his fastball was clocked in the low 90s when he pitched in high school—and speed is his lone below-average tool.

"Freddie lives to drive in runs," Ingle said. "Every time he goes up to the plate, he's looking to hit. He never looks to walk. He wants to do some damage. His pitch recognition and plate discipline are off the charts, and his production is so good because of his approach."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
491 70
155 33
7 18 95 46 84
5 5 .316 .378 .521
 
11. Michael Burgess, of, Hagerstown (Nationals)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 195 Age: 19 Drafted: Nationals '07 (1s)
A supplemental first-round pick in 2007, Burgess' power earned him acclaim as the top prospect in the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League in his debut. He continued to display his pop in the SAL, hitting 18 homers in four months and thrilling a packed house at the league's all-star game by going deep 16 times in 38 swings to easily win the home run derby.

The Nationals challenged the 19-year-old Burgess by moving him faster than initially expected. He has responded by making the necessary adjustments while remaining aggressive at the plate. He's capable of driving the ball out of any park to all fields with his plus bat speed and excellent plate coverage, though he needs to fine-tune his two-strike approach after batting .249 and whiffing 136 times in 401 at-bats with Hagerstown.

Burgess is a solid right fielder despite possessing below-average speed. He has a cannon for an arm and led the SAL with 26 outfield assists.

"That's a kid with tremendous power and a plus, plus arm," Roadcap said. "He's stockier than a guy like Stanton or Heyward, but Burgess may have been the strongest player in the league."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
401 60 100 26 4 18 60 46 136 5 1 .249 .335 .469
 
12. Che-Hsuan Lin, of, Greenville (Red Sox)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-0 Wt.: 180 Age: 19 Signed: Taiwan '06
Lin is making the Red Sox's $400,000 investment in his signing bonus last year look like a bargain. He showed tremendous poise and consistency for a 19-year-old in the SAL before earning MVP honors in the Futures Game as well as a spot on Taiwan's Olympic team.

While some pitchers were able to take advantage of the way Lin holds his hands high and employs a leg kick, he was able to adapt and drive balls to all parts of the field. He controls the strike zone and has the speed and know-how to steal bases. Managers rated him the best defensive outfielder in the league and some scouts thought his arm was just as strong as Burgess'.

"He's a tremendous talent," Boles said. "He has great bat speed and he can run the ball down in center field. He has plus speed and plus, plus arm strength. He has so many tools that he has a chance to be a premier defender at the major league level. Time will tell about the bat, but the offensive potential is definitely there."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
362 60 90 13 6 5 37 43 62 33 7 .249 .342 .359
 
13. Cole Rohrbough, lhp, Rome (Braves)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-3 Wt.: 205 Age: 20 Drafted: Braves '06 D/F (22)
Rohrbough burst onto the pro scene last year, dominating as the Rookie-level Appalachian League's top prospect before pitching equally well in the SAL. A bout of rotator-cuff tendinitis delayed his start to the 2008 season, and a lingering ankle injury from offseason workouts reared its head in June. Nevertheless, he managed to average 11.7 strikeouts per nine innings prior to a promotion in August.

Rohrbough sits in the low 90s with his fastball and throws a power curveball that resembles a slider with its sharp, late break. He mixes his pitches well and works both sides of the plate, though his changeup and control still need improvement. At 6-foot-3 and 205 pounds, he has good size and plenty of projection remaining.

"His stuff is electrifying," Ingle said. "Everything he throws is above average. When he's sharp, particularly with his breaking ball, he's close to unhittable. He also eats innings and competes very well."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13
12
3 4
0 4.94
58 55 37 32 3
31 76
.248
 
14. Jeff Locke, lhp, Rome (Braves)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-2 Wt.: 180 Age: 20 Drafted: Braves '06 (2)
Ranking among the league leaders in losses usually doesn't bode well for making the Top 20 Prospects list. While Locke ranked third in the SAL with 12 setbacks, that total was in no way indicative of how he pitched or what he's capable of achieving at higher levels.

Locke did a good job of mixing a low-90s fastball, a hard curveball and an average changeup. He also exhibited fine control, averaging 2.4 walks per nine innings and surrendering just six homers. Righthanders had difficulty picking up pitches from his herky-jerky delivery.

"Jeff received very little run support, especially during the first half, but he never let it bother him," Ingle said. "He was very consistent with great composure and he worked a lot of innings. He has two plus pitches right now and really knows how to use them."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
25
24
5 12
0 4.06
140 150 75 63 6
38 113 .269
 
15. Michael Taylor, of, Lakewood (Phillies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-6 Wt.: 250 Age: 22 Drafted: Phillies '07 (5)
Taylor attracts comparisons to Ryan Howard. Both were fifth-round picks of the Phillies, and Taylor has a similar build and raw power. No one is saying that Taylor is in the same class as a hitter at this point, but he put up better numbers in the SAL than Howard did at the same age, and Taylor is a better athlete as well.

After hitting just .227 in his pro debut last year out of Stanford, Taylor had few difficulties at either of his two Class A stops in 2008, batting a combined .346/.412/.557. He drives the ball with his long arms and has quick wrists, which help overcome a swing that can get long on occasion. He also displayed impressive focus, maintaining his advanced approach throughout the season.

Defensively, Taylor has a strong arm that could play in right field. He sees more time in left, however, because he's still learning to get good jumps and take proper routes on flyballs.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
249 40 90 12 3 10 50 31 43 10 3 .361 .441 .554
 
16. Alex Cobb, rhp, Columbus (Rays)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 180 Age: 20 Drafted: Rays '06 (4)
Cobb wasn't the flashiest pitcher in the league, but he made an impression by getting ahead of hitters and inducing groundballs. His 88-91 mph fastball has sink and deception, and he commands his 11-to-5 curveball well enough to throw it in any count. His splitter is a decent offering that he employs as a changeup.

At 6-foot-1 and 180 pounds, Cobb doesn't have a lot of projection remaining. But he does have enough stuff, combined with his feel for pitching and mound presence, to reach the major leagues as a starter.

"He's not overpowering, but his pitches get on top of the hitters because he's got some life," Quatraro said. "I think his curveball was the best breaking ball in the league. He likes to be out there on the mound, and he knows he has a chance to be pretty good."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
25
25
9 7
0 3.29
140 113 59 51
16
35 97 .224
 
17. Darin Holcomb, 3b, Asheville (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht.: 5-11 Wt.: 205 Age: 22 Signed: Rockies '07 (12)
At 22 the oldest player on this list—he's two weeks older than Taylor—Holcomb has made nice strides since signing as a 12th-round pick in 2007. His hard work and patience at the plate paid off with MVP honors in the SAL after he led the loop in doubles (46) and RBIs (102) while ranking second in on-base percentage (.400) and batting (.318). He also had more walks (65) than strikeouts (60).

"His head position is the best I have seen in my nine years in the league," Mikulik said. "He does a great job of staying back and driving the ball to all fields. He also played a solid third base for us. He has a real chance to play in the big leagues."

Some scouts wondered if Holcomb's so-so athleticism will enable him to remain at the hot corner. Moving him to second base would be a stretch, and he might be best suited for left field.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
509 89 162 46 0 14 102 65
60 6 5 .318 .400 .491
 
18. Caleb Gindl, of, West Virginia (Brewers)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 5-9 Wt.: 185 Age: 21 Drafted: Brewers '07 (5)
Unlike many players on this list, Gindl doesn't have overwhelming tools, but his production at the plate can't be ignored. He won the Rookie-level Pioneer League batting title with a .372 average in his pro debut last year, and as 19-year-old he ranked among the SAL leaders in numerous categories.

Gindl reminds scouts of Brian Giles in that he's a stocky player with impressive maturity and self-confidence. His remarkable hand-eye coordination enables him to put the barrel of the bat on the ball with consistency. His speed and right-field range are fringy, though he has plus arm strength that led some teams to consider drafting him as a lefthanded pitcher.

"He held his own in the first half and seemed to know he was going to put it all together," West Virginia manager Jeff Isom said. "He believes in himself and in his ability. He works hard and is determined to succeed."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
508
86 156 38 4 13 81 63 144 14 5 .307 .388 .474
 
19. Ryan Kalish, of, Greenville (Red Sox)
B-T: L-L Ht.: 6-1 Wt.: 205 Age: 20 Drafted: Red Sox '06 (9)
Kalish missed the first three weeks of the season while recovering from surgery to repair a broken hamate bone in his wrist that he sustained when hit by a pitch the previous July. He played right field for three months prior to moving to center when Lin left for the Olympics. Regardless of where he played, he proved to be a classic gamer by bringing a football mentality to the diamond.

Kalish batted in each of the top four spots in Greenville lineup. He has above-average foot speed, solid bat speed and a line-drive stroke with the potential for average power, making him best suited for the No. 2 or 3 hole. His instincts could allow him to stay in center, though he's not as impressive as Lin defensively, while his arm is close to average.

 "I really liked the way he plays the game," Quatraro said. "He has a good idea at the plate and battles very well."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
360 51 101 16 1 3 32 53
76 18 4 .281 .376 .356
 
20. Cody Johnson, of, Rome (Braves)
B-T: L-R Ht.: 6-4 Wt.: 195 Age: 20. Drafted: Braves '06 (1)
The 30th overall pick in the 2006 draft, Johnson was on pace to establish a SAL record for strikeouts during the first half of the season. He wound up second in the minors with 177 whiffs, but that doesn't tell the story of how much progress he made in the second half. He reduced his strikeout rate from 41 to 34 percent of his at-bats while improving his OPS from .658 to .918.

Scouts and manager rave about how hard Johnson hits the ball, as his all-or-nothing swing has produces jaw-dropping blasts. He worked diligently with Rome hitting coach Bobby Moore to use the opposite field and cut down on his swing with two strikes.

At the same time, Johnson's defense and arm strength are questionable at best, and many observers doubt his drive. His body language speaks volumes, especially when he becomes frustrated and fails to run balls out. The Braves have emphasized these aspects of the game, and Ingle believes Johnson is beginning to respond.

"I've been in professional baseball for 30 years and I've never seen anyone hit the ball as hard as Cody, and that includes Mark McGwire, Jose Canseco and Sammy Sosa," Ingle said. "If the ball is not hit right at an infielder, the defender doesn't have time to react and make the play. He improved as much as anyone in the league, and that includes his defense in left field. He really seemed to understand what it takes to develop and began working hard to move in that direction."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
468 62 118 26
1 26 89 40 177 8 3 .252 .307 .479