League Top 20 Prospects

California League Top 20 Prospects

Top of list strong, but depth drops off quickly in Cal League




FIVE YEARS AGO
1. *Dennis Tankersley, rhp, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
2. *Xavier Nady, 1b, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
3. *Rafael Soriano, rhp, San Bernardino (Mariners)
4. *Chris Snelling, of, San Bernardino (Mariners)
5. *Jake Peavy, rhp, Lake Elsniore (Padres)
6. *Jamal Strong, of, San Bernardino (Mariners)
7. Ryan Christianson, c, San Bernardino (Mariners)
8. *Ben Howard, rhp, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
9. *Bill Hall, ss, High Desert (Brewers)
10. *Chris Bootchek, rhp, Rancho Cucamonga (Angels)
*Has played in major leagues
A year after Brandon Wood, Stephen Drew and Howie Kendrick headlined a banner class in the high Class A California League, the talent level dipped quite a bit in 2006. There were a few very good prospects at the top of the league—namely 20-year-old sluggers Reid Brignac and Carlos Gonzalez and 20-year-old righthanders Franklin Morales, Nick Adenhart and Eric Hurley—but there were plenty of question marks after that.

Depth of talent was severely lacking, as there were just five position players whom a consensus of scouts and managers projected as future big league regulars. Besides Brignac and Gonzalez, that group included Stockton outfielder Travis Buck, Modesto shortstop Jonathan Herrera and Lancaster second baseman Emilio Bonifacio.

The league received an infusion of talent from the draft, as No. 2 overall pick Greg Reynolds, No. 3 choice Evan Longoria and No. 10 selection Tim Lincecum reached high Class A in a hurry. Among that trio, only Reynolds qualified for this list, as Longoria quickly smashed his way to Double-A and Lincecum's strict pitch count kept him from reaching the minimum innings threshold. Both Longoria and Lincecum would have been locks for the top 10 and made strong cases for the top five had they qualified.

Though neither Lancaster nor Modesto made the playoffs, they tied for the league high with four prospects on this Top 20 list. They featured the league's two breakthrough performers, Herrera and JetHawks infielder Mark Reynolds.

1. Reid Brignac, ss, Visalia (Devil Rays)
B-T: L-R Ht: 6-4 Wt: 203 Age: 20 Drafted: Devil Rays '04 (2)
Not only did Brignac grow two inches in the offseason, he worked hard with a personal trainer to add 15-20 pounds to his frame, allowing him to increase his power output from 15 homers a year ago to 24 between the Cal League and Double-A Southern League. Brignac is three months younger than Gonzalez, and he won league MVP honors even though he was promoted in August.

Brignac did commit 27 errors in 100 Cal League games, but scouts have become more convinced that the growing 6-foot-3, 203-pounder can remain at shortstop. He has enough arm strength for short and is learning to get into better fielding position on ground balls.

If he moves, Brignac figures to have plenty of bat for a corner position. He has a very quick lefthanded swing and an aggressive approach, though he has learned not to chase as many breaking balls out of the zone. Brignac also earns plaudits for his makeup.

"He wants to learn," said Bakersfield manager Carlos Subero, who managed Brignac in the California-Carolina all-star game. "I didn't know him until the all-star game, but he came up to me and asked how he was swinging, which is unusual. You don't see a kid ask other managers about his swing."
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
411 82 134 26 3 21 83 35
82 12 6 .326 .382 .557
 
2. Carlos Gonzalez, of, Lancaster (Diamondbacks)
B-T: L-L Ht: 6-1 Wt: 180 Age: 20 Signed: Diamondbacks FA '02
Gonzalez entered 2006 with huge expectations after winning MVP and top-prospect honors in the low Class A Midwest League last year, but he hardly took the Cal League by storm—at first. He hit just .253 with three homers in April but battered pitchers afterward and led the league with a .563 slugging percentage.

Gonzalez is a true five-tool talent who earns comparisons to fellow Venezuelan Bobby Abreu. He's a solid-average runner speed and defensive tools with the league's strongest outfield arm, although he led all minor league outfielders with 26 errors. He dazzles even more at the plate, where he has plus power and a solid approach. He gets a bit pull-happy sometimes and strikes out a little too much, but his progress is very impressive considering he was a 20-year-old in high Class A.

The lone negative was that Gonzalez' occasional lack of hustle and perceived arrogance turned off some scouts and managers. The JetHawks had to bench him a couple times early in the season, but he apologized and busted his tail thereafter.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
403 82 121 35 4 21 94 307 104 15 8 .300 .356 .563
 
3. Franklin Morales, lhp, Modesto (Rockies)
B-T: L-L Ht: 6-0 Wt: 170 Age: 20 Signed: Rockies FA '02
Morales led the Cal League with a 3.68 ERA and 179 strikeouts in 154 innings, an indication of just how electric his stuff is. He also ranked second to teammate Samuel Deduno with 89 walks, evidence of his biggest weakness—control and command. In particular, Morales needs to work on his command of his biting 12-to-6 curveball, which can be an above-average or better pitch at times but could use tightening at others.

Morales has a plus-plus fastball, sitting at 94-96 mph all game with plenty of life. He sometimes gets in trouble by using his curveball too much and forgetting about his mid-90s gas. Morales also has an average changeup that he throws without changing his arm speed from his fastball, making it difficult to pick up.

"He is exceptional: really good stuff, overpowering fastball, well above-average curveball in terms of break, and he throws the changeup for strikes near the plate," San Jose manager Lenn Sakata said. "When he's on, you're not going to hit him. He's just a little erratic and throws too many balls at times."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
27 26 10 9 0 3.68 154 126 77 63 9 89 179 .223
 
4. Nick Adenhart, rhp, Rancho Cucamonga (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-3 Wt: 195 Age: 19 Drafted: Angels '04 (1)
With his 2004 Tommy John surgery firmly in the rear-view mirror, Adenhart delivered on the considerable expectations for him in his first full season. He breezing through the first half in the Midwest League before a successful nine-start stint at Rancho Cucamonga. He faded at the end of the summer with Team USA in the Olympic qualifying tournament, probably a result of fatigue.

Adenhart stands out most for his outstanding command of three plus pitches: a 90-95 mph, a tight downer curveball that can be inconsistent at times and a plus-plus changeup with good fade and deception. He spots his fastball wherever he wants, isn't afraid to work inside and does a good job keeping the ball down.

Like Morales, Adenhart throws his changeup with the same arm speed and delivery as his fastball, making both pitches that much more effective. With a prototype pitcher's frame and smooth, high three-quarters delivery, he should continue to get better with experience.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
9 9 5 2 0 3.78 52 51 23 22 1 16 46 .258
 
5. Eric Hurley, rhp, Bakersfield (Rangers)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-4 Wt: 195 Age: 20 Drafted: Rangers '04 (1)
Hurley's numbers actually were more impressive in his six late-season Double-A starts than they were for Bakersfield, but he more than held his own as a 20-year-old in the hitter-friendly Cal League. At times he looked almost disinterested, perhaps weighed down by Bakersfield's struggles, in particular after he returned from the Futures Game. But he still gets high marks for his makeup, as he's very driven to reach the big leagues and receptive to instruction.

Hurley is a true power pitcher with a pair of plus pitches and a chance for a third. He gets stronger as the game progresses, so if opponents don't get to him early when his fastball sits around 90 mph, they'll have to contend with 93-96 mph heat in the late innings. He has developed enough confidence in his above-average slider to throw it in any count, an improvement from 2005. His changeup remains underutilized and below average, but he has good feel for it and is working on improving the pitch.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
18 18 5 6 0 4.11 101 92 60 46 12 32 106 .239
 
6. Travis Buck, of, Stockton (Athletics)
B-T: L-R Ht: 6-2 Wt: 205 Age: 22 Drafted: Athletics '05 (1)
Buck played just a month and a half in the Cal League before getting a promotion to Double-A, barely staying long enough to qualify for this list—but he made plenty of noise in his brief stint with Stockton. Though he hit just three homers in 126 at-bats, Buck proved to be a doubles machine and posted a 1.003 on base-plus-slugging percentage.

A pure hitter who laces line drives to all fields and has excellent plate discipline, Buck can turn on quality fastballs or wait and square up breaking balls just as easily. He never showed as much home run power at Arizona State as scouts expected, and he has just 10 homers in 497 pro at-bats, but the A's continue to believe the power will come as he incorporates his lower half into his swing more. Defensively, he has solid range and a good arm for a left fielder.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
126 24 44 17 3 3 26 14 18 2 1 .349 .400 .603
 
7. Jose Arredondo, rhp, Rancho Cucamonga (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-0 Wt: 170 Age: 22 Signed: Angels FA '02
A converted shortstop who has pitched only since 2004, Arredondo remains raw but tantalized scouts and managers with the Cal League's most electric fastball. Though he entered the season with just five innings of experience above Rookie ball, he handled the jump to high Class A admirably and pitched his way to Double-A.

Despite his slight 6-foot, 170-pound build, Arredondo has a mid-90s fastball that touches 97 mph and has late movement. He complements it with a splitter that can be filthy when he's on. He still needs to work on his slider, but it can be hammer with late, sharp break.

Arredondo also tinkers with a changeup and curveball, which both have promise but also a long way to go. He sometimes leaves his pitches up in the zone, and when he gets frustrated he can start to overthrow. His delivery has some effort to it, and that combined with his build and his fastball-splitter mix could lead him to a bullpen role.

"He's a little guy, but he pitches huge and comes right at you," a scout with an American League club said. "He has the best fastball in the league for me."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
15 15 5 6 0 2.30 90 62 28 23 4 35 115 .198
 
8. Greg Reynolds, rhp, Modesto (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-7 Wt: 220 Age: 21 Drafted: Rockies '06 (1)
Reynolds began to establish himself as a potential first-round pick during the Pacific-10 Conference season, beating fellow first-rounders Tim Lincecum and Brandon Morrow, and his stock kept on climbing right up until draft day. The Rockies made him the No. 2 overall pick and sent him to the Cal League, where his pitch count was strictly monitored, helping account for his low win total (two) in 11 starts.

Reynolds has a clean, repeatable delivery despite a big 6-foot-7 frame, and his repertoire is as polished as his mechanics. He has very good command of a 92-94 mph four-seam fastball, a high-80s two-seamer with good movement, a solid-average curveball and a changeup. He doesn't strike out as many batters as might be expected considering his size and stuff, but he keeps opponents at bay nonetheless.

"We couldn't hit him," Subero said. "You could see he was a polished guy—not 'wow'—but his fastball is not straight, it cuts. His curve is pretty good, he can throw a changeup, all three pitches for strikes. It's not lightning stuff, but he has a good head on his shoulders. He's on the fast track."
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
11 11 2 1 0 3.33 49 51 22 18 1 14 29 .271
 
9. Greg Smith, lhp,  Lancaster (Diamondbacks)
B-T: L-L Ht: 6-2 Wt: 190 Age: 22 Drafted: Diamondbacks '05 (6)
Smith was a sensation in the first half, when he went 9-0, 1.63 while pitching in Lancaster, a hitter's haven even by the inflated standards of the Cal League. He doesn't have overwhelming stuff, but he can locate any of his three average offerings wherever he wants.

Smith works around 90 mph with his fastball, which he can sink and cut, and the pitch seems faster because his changeup looks exactly the same out of his hand. He mixes those two offerings with a slurvy breaking ball, sometimes pitching backwards to confuse hitters.

"He beat us twice and we had no chance," Sakata said. "He kept you off balance. You never got a good swing, and you're hoping he walks somebody but he won't."

Smith has a quiet confidence on the mound, and his makeup off the field is just as impressive. He's always trying to learn and improve, even standing out for his diligence while charting pitches during his off days.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
13 13 9 0 0 1.63 88 57 21 16 3 31 71 .190
 
10. Jonathan Herrera, ss, Modesto (Rockies)
B-T: B-R Ht: 5-9 Wt: 155 Age: 21 Signed: Rockies FA '02
Herrera looked overmatched in his first tour through the Cal League as a backup to Troy Tulowitzki in 2005, but his game matured in every facet this year. Herrera and fellow speedy middle infielder Corey Wimberly caused all kinds of havoc atop the Modesto lineup, and Herrera had the much more impressive all-around game.

"He was a pain in the neck," Lancaster manager Brett Butler said. "He knows how to play the game. He's a little fireball and a leader on the field, and I'd take him on my team any day of the week."

Far more than just a sparkplug, Herrera has four average or better tools and is beginning to show some sneaky pop. He dazzles at shortstop thanks to his excellent range, smooth instincts, slightly above-average arm and quick release. His plus speed also helps him on the basepaths, where he's an aggressive basestealer.

As a hitter, Herrera has quick hands and can sting line drives to all fields from both sides of the plate. He still plays a little out of control sometimes, but he's becoming more selective and projects as a solid-average hitter with gap power and occasional home run pop.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
487 87 151 20 8 7 77 580 67 34 15 .310 .382 .427
 
11. Emilio Bonifacio, 2b, Lancaster (Diamondbacks)
B-T: B-R Ht: 5-11 Wt: 178 Age: 21 Signed: Diamondbacks FA '01
After spending the previous two years at low Class A South Bend, Bonifacio continued to improve significantly as he moved up to Lancaster, leading the league with 61 stolen bases (in 75 attempts) and finishing second with 117 runs. He draws comparisons to Twins second baseman Luis Castillo for his game and his body, and though his slugging percentage rose 119 points from a year ago, Bonifacio knows his game is keeping the ball on the ground and using his plus-plus speed.

"Whenever he pops a ball up, you can see his body language—he knows that's not him," an American League scout said. "He's a switch-hitter, a slap contact guy, he knows his game and looks very teachable and receptive. There's no doubt in my mind he'll play in the big leagues. He's got all the tools you look for in an All-Star second baseman. He may be the most exciting player I've seen in a while."

Bonifacio has been clocked between 3.4 and 3.6 seconds up the line from the left side on a bunt, giving him a chance for a hit on any grounder to the left side. He's always hustling and putting pressure on the defense, and his instincts on the basepaths are outstanding.

Bonifacio has the tools to be a plus defender at second base, with soft hands, good quickness and improving range. He still plays out of control at times and tends to rush his throws, but his arm strength is adequate and his exchange is very smooth.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
546 117 175 35 7 7 50 440 104 61 14 .321 .375 .449
 
12. Sean Rodriguez, ss, Ranco Cucamonga (Angels)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-1 Wt: 200 Age: 23 Drafted: Angels '03 (3)
Rodriguez hit much better in his second full season in Class A ball than he did in the Midwest League in 2005, when he hit .250/.371/.422 with 14 homers in 124 games. He came out of the gates on fire this year, batting .388 in April, and hit for power all season long, including a late-season promotion to Double-A

Rodriguez has at least average power, particularly to left field, though he hit a number of home runs to right-center this year as well. He strikes out a lot and needs to learn the zone better. He also has an upright stance and a long swing path, but it works fairly well for him.

The major question with Rodriguez is where he'll play. Despite a very strong arm, most scouts and managers agree that Rodriguez doesn't profile as an everyday shortstop, thanks to his thick, mature body and erratic actions. He played some second base, third base and center field at Cedar Rapids in 2005, showing enough instincts to handle any of those positions on a fill-in basis, though his below-average speed makes him an unlikely center fielder. Rodriguez' versatility might be his best asset, and he could be a big league utility player with some pop in his bat.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
455 78 137 29 5 24 77 470 124 15 3 .301 .377 .545
 
13. Mark Reynolds, if, Lancaster (Diamondbacks)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-1 Wt: 200 Age: 23 Drafted: Diamondbacks '04 (16)
Reynolds has been the forgotten man since his college days at Virginia, when he shared an infield with Ryan Zimmerman and Joe Koshansky. He began 2006 as a utility player at Lancaster, seeing significant playing time at shortstop (where he got 111 at-bats), second base, third base, left field, DH and even a few games at first.

Regardless of where he played, Lancaster made sure to get his bat in the lineup every day, and Reynolds exploded for 31 homers between the Cal League and Double-A, ranking third in the minors at the time he left to join Team USA for the Olympic qualifying tournament. He led the national team with four homers despite playing in just six of the tournament's nine games.

"I didn't know what to expect from him, then when I saw his power, I thought, 'This kid's got big league power,' " Butler said. "It was just him trying to recognize and make adjustments. He didn't miss a mistake. You throw a mistake, he's going to hit it. And he's very versatile. I think he can play all five of those positions if needed."

As with Rodriguez, Reynolds' ability to play multiple positions should land him at least a major league utility job. He has a quick, aggressive approach at the plate and can hit the ball with authority to all fields, though his power numbers were inflated by Lancaster's hitter-friendly Clear Channel Stadium. His footwork, range and arm are all fringy but playable for a utilityman.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
273 64 92 18 2 23 77 411 72 1 1 .337 .422 .670
 
14. Ben Harrison, of, Bakersfield (Rangers)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-4 Wt: 203 Age: 24 Drafted: Rangers '04 (7)
Harrison always has had tools, but his problem the last few years had been staying on the field. Hamstring and vision problems limited him in 2005, and his season was cut short by a broken hand just 12 games after a promotion to Bakersfield. But he stayed healthy throughout 2006 and finally showed what he was capable of, both in the Cal League and after a promotion to Double-A.

An outstanding fastball hitter who can also punish hanging breaking balls, Harrison's best tool is his above-average power. He struggles against quality breaking stuff, but his pitch recognition and plate discipline are improving.

Defensively, Harrison has a strong enough arm for right field and fringy range, probably ticketing him for left field. He was old for the Cal League and still needs to learn the strike zone a little better, but he has a chance to be a regular corner outfielder in the majors. He plays the game hard and emerged as a clubhouse leader for the Blaze.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
331 52 97 19 1 18 74 494 85 9 3 .293 .397 .520
 
15. Landon Powell, c, Stockton (Athletics)
B-T: B-R Ht: 6-3 Wt: 240 Age: 24 Drafted: Athletics '04 (1)
After missing all of 2005 with a torn anterior-cruciate ligament in his left knee, Powell looked fine behind the plate and at the plate for Stockton, even earning a mid-August promotion to Double-A. He stood out most among the Cal League's lackluster group of catchers. Everyone who sees Powell is surprised how nimble he is behind the plate considering his 6-foot-3, 235-pound build.

"He's got a lot of agility back there," Stockton manager Todd Steverson said. "He's got a great catch and release, real quick on that, and he blocks extremely well considering he had knee surgery last year."

Powell seemed to tire toward the end of his first full season as a pro and his throwing suffered, but he showed above-average arm strength at times earlier in the year. Offensively, he's switch-hitter with some power from both sides of the plate, hough he's much more advanced from the left side. His well below-average speed makes him a liability on the basepaths and hurts his batting average, because he won't ever run out any infield ground balls, but he draws his share of walks and puts himself in good hitter's counts.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
326 44 86 12 0 15 47 430 77 0 0 .264 .350 .439
 
16. Yung-Chi Chen, 2b, Inland Empire (Mariners)
B-T: R-R Ht: 5-11 Wt: 170 Age: 23 Signed: Mariners FA '05
Chen has performed well on the international stage, playing third base as the youngest member of Taiwan's 2004 Olympic team and winning all-tournament honors at the 2005 World Cup. His bat proved too advanced for the Cal League, and he was promoted to Double-A, where he continued to hit to the tune of .295/.365/.443.

Chen's biggest strength is his pure hitting ability. He has a good plan at the plate, makes consistent contact and can spray line drives to all fields. He doesn't have a lot of power, but he can find the gaps now and then, and his average speed plays well on the basepaths.   

He's not a standout defender at second base, where Chen can make tough plays and then suffer lapses on more routine plays. It's uncertain whether he has enough defensive skills to be an everyday player, but offensively he profiles as a potential No. 2 hitter thanks to his ability to make contact.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
278 49 95 17 3 5 48 221 40 21 7 .342 .388 .478
 
17. Fernando Perez, of, Visalia (Devil Rays)
B-T: B-R Ht: 6-1 Wt: 195 Age: 23 Signed: Devil Rays '04 (7)
Perez is a cerebral player, as one might expect from the highest-drafted player ever (seventh round, 2004) out of Columbia University. He learned how to switch-hit in the offseason, and while he struggled from the left side early in the year, he soon began hitting line drives and finished with a .303 average against righthanders. He's a dynamic player who led the minors with 123 runs scored.

"He's a game-changer. You don't want to see him up in the ninth inning up by one or in a tie game, because he'll bunt, he'll slap one to left or hit it in the gap, and you're just praying you'll get the ball in fast enough before he gets to third," Steverson said. "He's just irritating. He roams the outfield like there are just floating pop-ups up there all day. I know for a fact he's taken 15 hits away from us."

Perez has outstanding range in the outfield thanks to his plus-plus speed, though he's still working on his defensive instincts. He has a playable, if not strong, outfield arm. Perez has plenty of things to refine in his game—he strikes out too much for a top-of-the-order hitter, and he was thrown out in 16 of his 49 steal attempts—but he offers an intriguing leadoff package and enough strength at the plate to make him more than a one-dimensional Punch-and-Judy hitter.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
547 123 168 19 9 4 56 780 134 33 16 .307 .398 .397
 
18. Samuel Deduno, rhp, Modesto (Rockies)
B-T: R-R Ht: 6-1 Wt: 156 Age: 23 Signed: Rockies FA '03
Deduno continued to be an enigma, finishing second in the Cal League to teammate Morales with 167 strikeouts, but also leading the minors with 34 wild pitches and finishing fourth in the minors with 92 walks. Clearly, command is his bugaboo, but when he's on, he's nasty. His best pitch is a sometimes plus-plus power curveball, and he also showed an above-average 92-94 mph fastball with so much movement that his catchers would sometimes struggle to catch it cleanly.

"That breaking ball is devastating, but I don't know what to think of this guy," a National League scout said. "The breaking ball is unhittable when he commands it, but after two or three innings, he couldn't find the release point. He was lights out for three innings both times I saw him, then was an absolute thrower."

Right now, Deduno is essentially a two-pitch guy who profiles as a potential dominant reliver if he can harness his stuff. He has a little feel for his changeup, but it has a long way to go if he's to remain a starter.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
27 26 5 8 0 4.80 146 121 88 78 3 92 167 .222
 
19. Cesar Ramos, lhp, Lake Elsinore (Padres)
B-T: L-L Ht: 6-2 Wt: 190 Age: 22 Drafted: Padres '05 (1)
Ramos wore down in his 2005 pro debut after pitching 126 innings at Long Beach State that spring, but he entered this season refreshed and it showed. He went 7-4, 2.93 over the season's first four months before fatigue set in once again, and he went 0-4, 8.27 in August.

When he's at his best like he was in the first half, Ramos has very good command of a four-pitch mix. He has a solid-average fastball that sits at 88-91 mph and jumps up to 92-93 when he needs it, and he uses an average curveball and average slider. His best pitch is a plus changeup that's effective against righthanders.

Ramos doesn't rack up many strikeouts, but works to all corners of the zone to keep hitters off balance. He left too many pitches up late in the season when his arm was tired. He has an easy, compact delivery and a physical 6-foot-2, 200-pound frame that should prove more durable as he gets acclimated to a pro workload.
 
G GS W L SV ERA IP H R ER HR BB SO AVG
26 24 7 8 0 3.70 141 161 72 58 9 44 70 .292
 
20. Chase Headley, 3b, Lake Elsinore
B-T: B-R Ht: 6-2 Wt: 195 Age: 22 Drafted: Padres '05 (2)
A former high school valedictorian, Headley stands out most for his headsy approach to the game. Multiple managers commented on how much they enjoyed talking to him while they coached third base and he played the field.

Headley does everything fairly well but nothing exceptionally well. His biggest asset is his plate discipline and pitch recognition. A switch-hitter, he's much more effective as a lefty, though his swing is tailored more to hit line drives than home runs from both sides. Power is the biggest question mark, because he lacks physical projection and scouts doubt he'll have enough pop for third base.

He's a solid defender at the hot corner, with soft hands, a fairly strong, very accurate arm and adequate range. He does a good job charging bunts and makes all the routine plays. One scout compared Headley to Greg Norton, and he could end up as a solid player off the bench.
 
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS AVG OBP SLG
484 79 141 33 0 12 73 743 96 4 5 .291 .389 .434