McEwing Rising Quickly For White Sox





CHICAGO—Joe McEwing played in the majors as recently as 2006, but White Sox farm director Buddy Bell had no qualms about promoting McEwing to manage Triple-A Charlotte for 2011 after two years at high Class A Winston-Salem.

"Joe does a pretty good job in just about every phase of the game," Bell said. "Probably his best skill is handling people."

The promotion of McEwing and hiring of Pete Rose Jr. as manager at Rookie-level Bristol, were among the biggest changes to the Reds' minor league staffs. Bell managed McEwing, 38, in Kansas City and wanted to hire Rose, 41, when he was the farm director in Cincinnati 11 years ago.

Bell believes McEwing's grind-it-out style helped him persevere as a player for nine seasons with the Cardinals, Mets, Royals and Astros. It also should help him become adept at handling prospects on the verge of reaching the majors for the first time, as well as six-year free agents and journeymen thirsting for another shot at big league money.

"Joe has been through it," Bell said. "He has a good idea how to go through it. He has an edge and knows how things have to be done."

Several teams inquired about hiring McEwing, but the departure of Charlotte's 2010 manager Chris Chambliss, who became the hitting instructor with Seattle, opened the way for Bell to promote McEwing.

Bell decided to hire Rose last October after Rose made an impression as an instructor in instructional league last fall. Despite his lack of history with the organization, Rose wasn't afraid to speak up and make suggestions.

Rose managed last year for Florence of the independent Frontier League and played parts of four minor league seasons with the Sox.

"Pete is a lot like Joe in that he has a strong engine and is a bright kid," Bell said. "He's also very similar to his father (all-time hit leader Pete Rose Sr.) in the way he looks at the game. He has lots of energy and was a good teammate."

CHI-LITES

• Seven-time Gold Glove outfielder Devon White was named baserunning instructor. White stole 346 bases during his 17-year major league career.

• The recent appointments came after the Sox lost Chambliss, Chris Cron and Ernie Young (both to the Tigers) in separate promotions. "They all had an impact on our organization," Bell said. "But we're happy for them."