Red Sox's Ryan Kalish In Recovery Mode





BOSTON—A play that typified the approach of Ryan Kalish jeopardized the outfielder's season. On April 21, Kalish injured his left shoulder attempting a diving catch for Triple-A Pawtucket. He had to be escorted off the field with his arm being held at his side.

The initial concern for the outfielder and the team was that he might have suffered a season-ending injury, perhaps even a dislocated shoulder. Instead, it turned out to be a partial tear of the labrum in his left shoulder—related, perhaps, to a pre-existing football injury that the 6-foot, 215-pound Kalish suffered in high school.

After three weeks of rest and rehab, Kalish showed sufficient progress in his recovery that he was deemed capable of rehabbing, rather than requiring season-ending surgery. Though Kalish will ultimately end up missing a significant stretch of the year, the 23-year-old—who was hitting .236/.300/.309 at the time—was expected to resume his season sometime this summer.

"As long as the progress continues without any major interruptions, it looks like he's on a path to recovery without surgery, which is what we were hoping for," Red Sox general manager Theo Epstein said. "We're excited about that news."

Still, the Sox will proceed cautiously with Kalish, a ninth-round pick in 2006 who has positioned himself as the big league club's likely right fielder of the future. Because the injury is to his throwing shoulder, the team will have him re-build his arm strength deliberately.

He had started swinging and throwing at 60-90 feet in mid-May, but the team will have him stretch out slowly as he continues his rehab at extended spring training.

"It's just about how long the progression is going to take at this point. He's having no soreness. He's moving along," farm director Mike Hazen said. "Every day he moves further and further away from the trauma of the injury, and now it's about building up the strength."

"Nobody wants to go too fast on this thing and irritate anything. There's still going to be a timeframe built into this thing, but he's doing almost everything."

Sox Yarns

• When 21-year-old Jose Iglesias made his big league debut on May 8, he became the youngest Sox position player to appear in a game since Rich Gedman in 1980. The shortstop went 0-for-4 in six games before being optioned back to Triple-A.

• Righthander Michael Bowden earned a brief callup in mid-May, a reflection of his strong first full season as a reliever. In 14 appearances at Pawtucket, he had a 1.59 ERA, 28 strikeouts and four walks in 23 innings.