Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
2 65 Baltimore Orioles Branden Kline RHP Va. $793,700
As a high schooler in Maryland, Kline came on strong late in 2009. He told teams he had no interest in signing, but the Red Sox tried anyway, drafting him in the sixth round. Kline stuck to his word and went to Virginia, where he pitched mostly in relief as a freshman and as the closer in 2011. He moved to the rotation as a junior and has seen mixed results. He was 6-3, 3.52 in 72 innings with 76 strikeouts and 31 walks, but had a stretch of starts when he allowed just 19 hits and eight walks in 34 innings while striking out 40. Kline has a good, lean pitcher's frame at 6-foot-3 and 195 pounds, with long limbs and projection remaining. Most of Virginia's pitchers adopt similar deliveries in which they start in a squat position and stay low throughout, and this style has prevented Kline from consistently staying on top of his pitches and commanding them. When Kline is on, his fastball can sit in the low 90s. His secondary stuff has been inconsistent and tends to blend together, but his slider can be a power pitch in the low 80s. Teams could try to iron his delivery out so he can reach his ceiling as a mid-rotation starter, but he could pitch with power stuff as a reliever as well.
5 161 Seattle Mariners Chris Taylor SS Va. $500,000
Despite being the 3-A high school player of the year in Virginia in 2009, Taylor went undrafted and saw limited action as a freshman for the Cavaliers. He started all 68 games for Virginia as a sophomore, however, solidifying himself at shortstop after spending the first four games in the outfield. He had been up and down this spring and was hitting .279/.374/.448 in 201 at-bats. Taylor doesn't have one standout tool, but he gets attention with his defense and speed. He has a chance to stay at shortstop with good hands, a strong arm and good range, as he is a plus runner. The question is how much he will hit. He tends to stick with an inside-out approach and doesn't let loose as much as scouts would like. He has 21 extra-base hits, but he's a gap hitter as his home run power is below-average. He would be a useful utility player, but a team that thinks he can provide solid offense at shortstop could take him in the first four rounds.
7 224 Chicago Cubs Stephen Bruno 2B Va. $150,000
At 5-foot-9, 165 pounds, Bruno doesn't look like a typical middle-of-the-order hitter, but he was the Cavaliers' leading hitter heading into regionals with a .362/.418/.549 line. His size is his biggest detractor as he isn't overwhelmed by velocity and is a solid runner. He's capable of playing third base, shortstop and second base so he could be a solid utility player at the pro level.
20 613 Kansas City Royals Shane Halley OF Va.