Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1 15 Cleveland Indians Tyler Naquin OF Texas $1,750,000
Naquin is the best pure hitter in the entire 2012 draft. He won the Big 12 Conference batting title (.381) and topped NCAA Division I in hits (104) as a sophomore, and he's leading the Big 12 in hitting (.397) again this spring. He has a quick lefthanded bat and a controlled approach at the plate, focusing on staying inside the ball and employing the opposite field. He also has the best throwing arm among college outfielders, earning 65-70 grades on the 20-80 scouting scale and a don't-run-on-him reputation in the Big 12. Additionally, he's a solid runner who flashes plus speed at times. Despite all those attributes, Naquin will last until the second half of the first round because most teams view him as a tweener who lacks the power for right field and the defensive chops for center. He has a 6-foot-2, 175-pound frame with narrow shoulders, and his ability to add strength and develop average power remains in question. He can drive the ball in batting practice but doesn't show the same kind of pop in games, hitting just seven homers in 173 college contests. His ability to play center field is undetermined because the Aggies use speedster Krey Bratsen there, and some scouts don't love Naquin's routes on fly balls.
1 19 St. Louis Cardinals Michael Wacha RHP Texas $1,900,000
After the consensus top three college pitchers (Stanford's Mark Appel, Louisiana State's Kevin Gausman, San Francisco's Kyle Zimmer) go off the board, Wacha could be the next one selected. He owns the best changeup in the draft, a pitch that can be devastating when he sets it up with a 90-93 mph fastball that peaks at 96. His command also is as good as any pitcher in this crop, as is his competitiveness. He also has an athletic 6-foot-6, 200-pound frame and delivers his pitches on a tough angle to the plate. The only thing keeping him from being considered on the top tier of college arms is the lack of a plus breaking ball. Wacha made progress with a slider last summer under the tutelage of Team USA pitching coach Rob Walton, and he also throws a curveball. Wacha generally sticks with whichever breaking pitch is working best on a given day. Both pitches can get loose at times and project as no better than average at the big league level. Despite that one shortcoming, he still could find his way into the first 10 picks. He may not have the ceiling of Appel, Gausman or Zimmer, but Wacha has a higher floor.
5 176 Los Angeles Dodgers Ross Stripling RHP Texas $130,000
Stripling was mostly a football and basketball player in high school in Texas before breaking his left leg as a senior. Bored during his rehab, he began fooling around on the mound with a cast on his leg, then went 14-0 in his first season as a pitcher, earning an academic scholarship and walking on at Texas A&M. He tied for the NCAA Division I lead with 14 wins and helped the Aggies reach the College World Series in 2011, then returned for his senior season after failing to sign with the Rockies as a ninth-rounder. On the day (May 12) he was scheduled to graduate with a degree in finance, he threw a no-hitter against San Diego State. The scouting report remains the same on Stripling. He's an athletic 6-foot-3, 190-pounder who works at 88-91 mph with his fastball and gets outs with his 12-to-6 curveball. He uses an over-the-top delivery, which he repeats well, and has a decent changeup. He has the stuff and command to make it as a starter, and he's intriguing as a reliever because he hit 94 mph and featured a sharper curve when he came out of the bullpen in past seasons.
20 633 Arizona Diamondbacks Jacob House 1B Texas
20 637 New York Yankees Mikey Reynolds SS Texas
24 737 Miami Marlins Matt Juengel 3B Texas
35 1071 Chicago White Sox Kyle Martin RHP Texas
40 1222 Cincinnati Reds Rafael Pineda RHP Texas