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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 32 Minnesota Twins Jose Berrios RHP Papa Juan XXIII HS, Bayamon, P.R. P.R. $1,550,000
In the history of the draft, only two pitchers from Puerto Rico have been drafted in the top two rounds--Jorge Lopez, who went in the second round to the Brewers last year and Luis Atilano, a Braves supplemental first-round pick from 2003. This year, there may be two more on that list and Berrios will likely be the first off the board. Berrios worked with a conditioning coach this fall and spring and added 20-25 pounds to his frame since the summer and now has a muscular, athletic 6-foot-1, 180-pound physique. The added muscle has allowed him to smooth things out and has boosted his fastball velocity. His fastball now sits in the 93-95 mph range and some scouts have seen him touch 98. He throws his fastball down in the zone, mixes in a sharp, 80-81 mph slider and shows the makings of a solid changeup with fading action. Berrios is getting buzz as high as the back of the first round, and it's unlikely he'll wind up honoring his commitment to Miami Dade JC.
2 33 San Diego Padres Zach Eflin RHP Hagerty HS, Oviedo, Fla. Fla. $1,200,000
Eflin was shaping up as a first-round wild card. The Central Florida recruit had added velocity over the course of the 2011 showcase circuit and was maintaining that velocity this spring, sitting in the 90-94 mph range and touching 96-97 at times. Eflin complements his fastball with one of the best changeups in the prep ranks and an inconsistent, slurvy curveball that nonetheless has decent shape and flashed average. Eflin missed the month of April due to triceps tendinitis, and an MRI on his elbow came back negative. Eflin returned to pitch three innings in his team's playoff finale and touched 94 while flashing a solid breaking ball. Eflin was pitching his way into the first round until his injury; his signability and performance at the Florida prep all-star game in Sebring likely will determine how high he goes in the draft, though he still had a shot to go out in the first round.
3 34 Oakland Athletics Daniel Robertson 3B Upland (Calif.) HS Calif. $1,500,000
Scouts have a variance of opinion on Robertson, but the strong consensus is that someone will probably like him enough to take him in the supplemental first round, and no later than the second. His best tool is his quick righthanded bat, which produces loads of hard doubles and has a chance to be a plus tool. Even his detractors project it to be average. He flashes pop to the pull side, and assessments of his power potential range from 45 to 60 on the 20-80 scale, depending on which scout you ask. Robertson plays shortstop in high school but projects as a third baseman in pro ball. Some scouts think his hands, instincts and arm all project as above-average and believe he can be a standout defender at the hot corner. His weakest tool is his speed, which is below-average at best. A UCLA commit, Robertson is a gamer with plenty of baseball savvy and more polish than most high school prospects.
4 35 New York Mets Kevin Plawecki C Purdue Ind. $1,400,000
Purdue is steaming toward its first Big Ten Conference regular-season championship in 103 years, thanks in large part to Plawecki, an offensive-minded catcher with enough defensive savvy to make it to the majors as a regular behind the plate. Plawecki has a mature approach, focusing on staying inside the ball and driving it back up the middle. Scouts marvel at his ability to make contact, as he has struck out just 28 times in 154 games over three seasons with the Boilermakers. A 6-foot-1, 215-pound righthanded hitter, he could develop average power once learns to backspin balls and turn on pitches. Defensively, Plawecki has fringe arm strength that plays up thanks to a quick release, and he has thrown out 40 percent of basestealers while making just one error this spring. He throws from a low three-quarters slot that costs him velocity and accuracy, and he developed a tired arm when he used a more traditional release point. He's an efficient receiver who calls his own pitches and takes charge of his pitching staff. Add it all up, and Plawecki draws comparisons to a righthanded-hitting version of A.J. Pierzynski.
5 36 St. Louis Cardinals Stephen Piscotty OF/3B Stanford Calif. $1,430,400
For the teams that value track record, Piscotty has been a consistent performer. He's hit well all three years at Stanford, hit well in the Alaska League after his freshman year and led the Cape Cod League in batting last year. Piscotty has a strong frame at 6-foot-3 and 215 pounds. He has a soild, line-drive approach at the plate and projects as more of a doubles hitter than a home run threat. Piscotty's bat profiles better at third base than it does in a corner outfield spot. But if he has to move there as a pro--which is likely, since he moved to the outfield midway through the season at Stanford to make room at third for freshman Alex Blandino--then it's a tougher profile as a righthanded hitter with limited power potential. Piscotty has a strong arm and is a fringe-average runner and scouts like his makeup and work ethic.
6 37 Boston Red Sox Pat Light RHP Monmouth N.J. $1,000,000
A New Jersey high school product, Light attracted attention on the showcase circuit in the summer of 2008, but he didn't get drafted until the 28th round in 2009 (by the Twins) and headed to Monmouth, where he has carved out a solid career. He has added weight to his projectable frame and is now listed at a physical 6-foot-6, 200 pounds. He has dominated his competition this season and was 7-3, 2.81 with 87 strikeouts in 86 innings. He throws a ton of strikes with a fastball that ranges from 90-96 mph and has walked 12 batters on the season. Both his slider and changeup need work but flash promise. If his secondary stuff progresses, he has the frame, arm strength and command to be a starter, but he could feature a plus-plus fastball in a late-inning relief role.
7 38 Milwaukee Brewers Mitch Haniger OF Cal Poly Calif. $1,200,000
The brother of former Georgia Tech slugger Jason Haniger, Mitch is a physical specimen who was a standout wide receiver in high school. He has has generated top-50-pick buzz this spring by showing two legitimate plus tools in his power and arm strength. His throws are low and accurate with good carry, leading scouts to believe Haniger can play right field in the big leagues, though he plays a decent center field for the Mustangs. Haniger racked up nine outfield assists through just 39 games this spring. He's a fringe-average runner and an average defender with a chance to be a fringe-average hitter. He has refined his setup this spring, getting his hands in better hitting position and staying in sync more consistently. He also has become more selective, walking as much as he strikes out and handling offspeed stuff much better than he did earlier in his career, especially with two strikes. His improved approach and pitch recognition has allowed him to make good use of his power--he had more home runs (11) through 12 weeks than the top two teams in the Big West combined.
8 39 Texas Rangers Joey Gallo 3B/RHP Bishop Gorman HS, Las Vegas Nev. $2,250,000
Gallo is an enigma. There's thunder in his bat, and he can put on a show in batting practice. He became Nevada's state leader in career home runs this season after hitting his 60th, and he crushed the 10th-longest home run in Petco Park history at the Perfect Game All-America Game with wood last summer. But scouts wonder how he'll tap into that power in pro ball. He swings and misses a lot and sometimes looks overmatched against below-average stuff. Gallo has a big league body at 6-foot-5 and 205 pounds. He's not mobile at third base, so while his strong arm plays, his limited range and quickness would work better at first. That would put a lot of pressure on his bat. If he signs instead of heading to Louisiana State, Gallo will likely go out as a position player, but he has a fallback option as a pitcher. He's raw on the mound and has one of the strongest arms of any position player in this year's draft and has been clocked at 98 mph off the mound in short outings. He sits in the 93-95 mph range and mixes in an intriguing slider.
9 40 Philadelphia Phillies Shane Watson RHP Lakewood (Calif.) HS Calif. $1,291,300
Watson's two showdowns against fellow Southern California signee Chase DeJong were among the most heavily scouted games of the spring. DeJong has better feel for pitching presently, but Watson has higher upside, and he elevated his stock into sandwich round territory during his strong first half. Watson pitches with an 89-93 mph fastball and can reach back for 94-96 even in the late innings. When he's on (as he was for most of the spring), his 77-80 mph curveball is has tight rotation and sharp bite, and most scouts project it as a second plus pitch. His stuff wasn't quite as crisp in his second matchup against DeJong, when he pitched more in the 88-90 range and bumped 92, while his curveball has less power in the 73-78 range. Still, he has shown quality stuff often enough this spring, and scouts like his prototypical 6-foot-4, 190-pound frame and his competitiveness. He has some feel for a changeup that shows decent tumble at times, though he tends to throw it too hard at 84 mph. He has tinkered with a cutter at times as well, but the curveball is his bread and butter. While he has decent control, he needs to fine-tune his command. But his delivery and arm action work, suggesting his command will improve over time.
10 41 Houston Astros Lance McCullers Jr. RHP Jesuit HS, Tampa Fla. $2,500,000
McCullers' father was a second-round pick in 1982 out of Tampa's Catholic High and had a seven-year major league career, primarily as a reliever. His son emerged early on as one of the top members of the 2012 draft class and at one time rated as the class' top player. Built similarly to his father but bigger at 6-foot-2, 205 pounds, McCullers has a strong, athletic body and pitches with power and aggression. He was used mostly as a reliever the last two years in high school and had his outings limited to two- or three-innings regularly prior to this season. Now starting, he's learned to go through a lineup repeatedly and has improved his strike-throwing ability with both his fastball and his slider. Some scouts put 70 grades on both pitches, and that might be selling McCullers short. His fastball sits 94-96 mph deep into games, with reports that he's hit 100 several times this spring. His slider, also thrown with power in the mid-80s, has good bite and depth. McCullers has thrown a changeup but it's an unnecessary third pitch in high school. Most evaluators believed McCullers had no shot to stay in a rotation as a professional, but he's started to change some minds this spring with his improved pitchability. The majority of scouts still believe he's a future reliever, though, which makes it harder to find a first-round fit. McCullers has committed to hit and pitch at Florida if he slides too far.
11 42 Minnesota Twins Luke Bard RHP Georgia Tech Ga. $1,227,000
Bard's older brother Daniel attended North Carolina and was a 2006 first-round pick prior to reaching the major leagues with the Red Sox. Boston also drafted Luke out of high school, in the 16th round in 2009, but he didn't sign and attended Georgia Tech. Like his older brother, Bard has excellent arm strength and an iffy breaking ball. He's not as explosive as his brother but has plenty of power in his fastball, at times sitting 93-95 mph. He also flashed a power breaking ball with depth and late bite. Injuries and ineffective freshmen led Georgia Tech to give Bard a couple of starts, and he was effective while sticking to two pitches. He left a start against Duke on March 31 after 4 1/3 innings, however, and has not pitched since then. Doctors since diagnosed a torn lat muscle, and Bard isn't expected to return this season. At his best, he had a classic college reliever profile and big league bloodlines, so his injury probably will not be a long-term concern.
12 43 Chicago Cubs Pierce Johnson RHP Missouri State Mo. $1,196,000
Few colleges can match Missouri State's recent track record for producing pitchers. Since 2001, the Bears have had three hurlers drafted in the first or sandwich rounds and sent a total of seven to the big leagues. The next in line is Johnson, who started to come on at the end of his sophomore season a year ago and ranked sixth in NCAA Division I in strikeouts per nine innings (11.5) in mid-May. The 6-foot-3, 180-pounder misses bats with a lively 92-93 mph fastball that reaches 96 mph and a hard three-quarters breaking ball. He'll mix in an 86-87 mph cutter a few times per game and has improved his feel for his changeup. While scouts have no quibbles with Johnson's stuff, they do have some concerns, most notably his health. He missed two starts this spring with a forearm strain, an issue that also cropped up in high school and during the fall of his freshman year. He wasn't as sharp in his first three starts after his layoff, which could drop him from the first round to the supplemental first. He also dislocated a knee while warming up in the bullpen last summer in the Cape Cod League, and missed much of his high school senior season after breaking his hand on a comebacker. Johnson has just decent control and command, though he has improved in both regards this year. He also can fall in love with his breaking ball a bit too much.
13 44 San Diego Padres Travis Jankowski OF Stony Brook N.Y. $975,000
One of the best athletes in this draft class, Jankowski stands out for his speed, bat and defense. He has a live body and stands at 6-foot-2, 190 pounds, and he's a plus runner who plays above-average defense in center field with an average arm. A lefthanded hitter, Jankowski has an unorthodox swing, but it works for him. It's a handsy swing similar to Dustin Ackley's, but Jankowski doesn't have the same power or strength. His five career home runs provide evidence of his well below-average power, but that won't be his game anyway. He has a knack for putting the ball in play and has the speed to beat out infield hits. He had 30 stolen bases in 35 attempts through 47 games and doesn't strike out much (15 in 177 at-bats).
14 45 Pittsburgh Pirates Barrett Barnes OF Texas Tech Texas $1,000,000
Barnes has a chance to go in the first round and probably won't last past the sandwich round, which would make him the second-highest draft pick in Texas Tech history behind Doug Harris (fifth overall, 1989). Barnes' plus righthanded power and the possibility that he could stick in center field make him attractive. He packs a lot of strength into his 6-foot-1, 219-pound frame and offers a lot of bat speed. He's willing to take walks when pitchers don't challenge him, though he may not hit for a high average because his swing can get rotational and he's a dead-pull hitter. Barnes has plus straight-line speed (6.6-6.7 seconds in the 60-yard dash) but it doesn't always play that way. He does have 50 steals in 56 career attempts. If Barnes has to move to corner--likely left field because he has a below-average arm--he has enough power to profile there.
15 46 Colorado Rockies Eddie Butler RHP Radford Va. $1,000,000
Radford has had just two players drafted in the first 10 rounds in its history, and Butler figures to be the third this spring even though he doesn't stand out physically and was averaging less than a strikeout per inning in the Big South Conference. Butler, 6-foot-2 and 165 pounds, has a heavy fastball with boring action that ranges from 90-96 mph, and he has shown aptitude by adding and subtracting from it. He'll sit around 93 mph and amp it up to 95-96 against the middle of an order. He has touched 97 mph late in games. He throws a slider that could be a good pitch but currently lags behind, and his changeup needs work, which could explain why he's not striking more hitters out. Teams will likely give Butler a chance to stick as a starter, but he could move quickly in a bullpen role.
16 47 Oakland Athletics Matt Olson 1B Parkview HS, Lilburn, Ga. Ga. $1,079,700
Olson pitches (righthanded) and hits for Parkview, also known as Jeff Francoeur's alma mater, and has one of the draft's sweeter lefthanded swings. Olson has had a big spring, homering off the nation's top prep lefthander, Max Fried, during the National High School Invitational, and has pitched well also, going 11-0, 1.24. Olson's arm strength would come in handy in the outfield if he could run, and some team might try him in left field, but he's generally considered a plodder and well-below-average runner. His value is in his bat, and scouts think he'll be an above-average hitter for average and power. He shows natural hitting rhythm and a graceful, low-maintenance swing, and his knack for finding the barrel of the bat and good strength help him drive the ball to all fields. Olson is committed to Vanderbilt as a two-way player and could contribute on the mound, but scouts in Georgia aren't convinced he'll be a tough sign and believe he wants to play pro ball. Florida prep first baseman Dan Vogelbach was a second-rounder last year, and while most scouts liked Vogelbach's power potential better, Olson should still go in about the same draft range if teams believe he's signable.
17 48 Chicago White Sox Keon Barnum 1B King HS, Tampa Fla. $950,000
Barnum and Georgia prep Matt Olson have similar profiles as lefthanded-hitting power prep first basemen. Olson has superior hitting ability and ranks higher, but Barnum has more power, which may elevate him past Olson on some draft boards. Barnum has been a prospect since eighth grade, joining Reggie Williams' travel-ball team in the Tampa area as a 14-year-old and playing with older competition. Scouts have seen plenty of his somewhat long but powerful, leveraged swing. He has the strength and loft power to earn 70 raw power grades on the 20-80 scouting scale. Barnum also has long arms that lead to swings and misses, and he's not always confident or comfortable against offspeed pitches. His solid-average arm strength would be wasted at first base, and his fringe-average speed could make left field a possibility down the road. He's a Miami recruit.
18 49 Cincinnati Reds Jesse Winker OF Olympia HS, Orlando Fla. $1,000,000
Scouts like to call players like Winker "famous" because he's been seen a lot. He is a showcase veteran who played for USA Baseball's 18-and-under team last summer and fall, tossing a shutout against Aruba. He also has played at high-profile Olympia High and was a teammate of Yankees prospect Mason Williams in 2010 and the last three years with righthander Walker Weickel, who is expected to go in the first two rounds. Winker helped lift Olympia to a tremendous spring, though it fell in the playoffs after winning its first 29 games. Winker is a lefthanded hitter and thrower who plays center field in high school but will be a corner outfielder or first baseman down the line because of modest athleticism. While he's a fine hitter with good balance and loft in his swing, that profile puts his bat at a premium, and Winker had just three home runs this spring. He's physical and has strength that allows him to drive the ball to all fields, and scouts have seen him hit good velocity in showcases. They laud his makeup and work ethic. Signability was a major question mark for the Florida recruit.
19 50 Toronto Blue Jays Matt Smoral LHP Solon (Ohio) HS Ohio $2,000,000
Smoral entered 2012 projected to go in the top half of the first round, and only enhanced his status in his first appearance of the season. In a March scrimmage on Solon High's football field, he worked off a portable mound in front of four dozen scouts. He sat at 90-93 mph with his fastball for three innings, then bumped it up to 94 mph in the fourth. He also showed a plus low-80s slider and command that day. But Smoral would make only one regular-season appearance, during which he was hampered by blisters, before being diagnosed with a broken fourth metatarsal bone in his right foot. He had surgery April 6 and isn't expected to be able to pitch before the July 13 signing deadline. Nevertheless, he still figures to land somewhere in the first round and forego a scholarship from North Carolina. A lanky 6-foot-7, 225-pounder, Smoral throw from a low three-quarters angle that presents difficult angle for hitters. He's still growing into his body and learning how to stay on top of his pitches, but he's athletic enough to eventually figure that out. He'll also have to improve his changeup, a pitch he had little use for against Ohio high school competition.
20 51 Los Angeles Dodgers Jesmuel Valentin 2B Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, Gurabo, P.R. P.R. $984,700
The son of Jose Valentin, who spent 16 years in the big leagues, Jesmuel has grown up around the game and spent plenty of time around major league clubhouses. Jesmuel has a similar build to his father at 5-foot-10 and 175 pounds. He's primarily a shortstop, but plays a lot of second base in deference to his high school teammate at Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, Carlos Correa. He'll likely get a shot to play shortstop in pro ball and has the defensive versatility to play all over the diamond, but many scouts believe he's best suited for the keystone. Valentin is a steady defender with a strong arm and is a solid-average runner with good instincts on the bases. His tools play up because of his hard-nosed approach and instincts for the game. At the plate, he has a line-drive approach, and his strong forearms allow him to spray the ball from gap to gap with authority. Valentin projects more as a doubles hitter than a slugger, but he does have the strength and bat speed to hit the ball out of the park. A natural righthanded hitter, he has been switch-hitting for about a year and half and is still working to feel comfortable as a lefty.
21 52 St. Louis Cardinals Patrick Wisdom 3B St. Mary's Calif. $678,790
While most scouts like Wisdom's defense and makeup, this spring has raised questions about how much he'll hit. Scouts who believe in him point to his track record, which includes a .351/.423/.582 line last year and a league-leading seven home runs in the Alaska League last summer, when he was the league's No. 2 prospect. They see a solid hitter with above-average power. This year, however, he was hitting just .254/.380/.435. Scouts who don't believe in Wisdom don't think he'll have enough bat to profile at third base, where he's a strong defender with above-average arm strength. He is an average runner who moves well for his size, and a great teammate with an outstanding work ethic. Wisdom played some catcher in high school, and a team may ask him to give that another shot.
22 53 Texas Rangers Collin Wiles RHP Blue Valley West HS, Stilwell, Kan. Kan. $975,000
After producing perhaps the best crop of draft talent in state talent a year ago, Kansas may not have a player drafted in the first 10 rounds in 2012. The Sunflower State's top prospect is Wiles, a Vanderbilt recruit who is considered all but unsignable and likely will slide in the draft. He's extremely projectable at 6-foot-4 and 180 pounds, and his athleticism and clean delivery allow him to command three pitches. He currently deals his fastball at 86-88 mph and tops out at 90, and he should sit comfortably in the low 90s once he fills out. He also has a promising slider and advanced feel for a changeup.
23 54 Philadelphia Phillies Mitch Gueller RHP West HS, Chehalis, Wash. Wash. $940,200
Gueller stands out on the field with his 6-foot-3, 205-pound frame, and some scouts regard him as the top athlete in the Northwest this year. He ran a 6.90-second 60-yard dash at the Area Code Games last summer and shows strength with the bat but is more advanced on the mound. The Washington State recruit pitches with a quick pace, already has an above-average fastball and shows flashes with his secondary offerings. Gueller doesn't face quality competition, but he has been up to 93 mph every time out and has touched 94. He shows flashes of an above-average breaking ball and changeup, too. The breaking ball can be a little slurvy right now and will likely be turned into more of a true slider in pro ball.
24 55 San Diego Padres Walker Weickel RHP Olympia HS, Orlando Fla. $2,000,000
Weickel answered USA Baseball's call several times in his high school career and stuck with the 18U national team last November after many other pitchers bailed on the program. Weickel was the best pitcher on the 18U team that won the Pan American championships gold medal. Tall and lanky at 6-foot-6, 200 pounds, Weickel grew almost two inches in the last year and uses his frame to pitch downhill with a heavy fastball. He also has feel for a curveball and changeup and uses pitch stuff in a mature manner. His stuff was down this spring, as he often pitched with a fastball in the upper 80s rather than the low 90s heat he showed in the past. Scouts said the ball wasn't coming out of his hands the way it had in the past, even though Weickel never lost for his undefeated Olympia High club. His curveball also needs more power, as he often threw it in the 68-72 mph range. Weickel's advocates point to his angle, track record and his late growth spurt as reasons for optimism. If he can regain some body control and if his strength can catch up to his frame, Weickel could still develop into a mid-rotation starter with three average-to-plus offerings. But that involves a lot of projection right now, perhaps dropping Weickel into the supplemental or second round.
25 56 Chicago Cubs Paul Blackburn RHP Heritage HS, Brentwood, Calif. Calif. $911,700
Blackburn stands 6-foot-2 and weighs 180 pounds. He is a good athlete and shows a clean delivery that he repeats well. His fastball sits in the 90-92 mph range and tops out at 94. Scouts can still project on Blackburn. His curveball and changeup show promise and he could eventually have three plus pitches. Because of his athleticism and smooth mechanics, scouts believe he will also eventually pitch with above-average control and command. He shows good feel and poise on the mound, too. Blackburn has consistently pitched well throughout the spring and is interested in professional baseball, so scouts don't believe he'll wind up at Arizona State, where he has committed.
26 57 Cincinnati Reds Jeff Gelalich OF UCLA Calif. $825,000
Gelalich played alongside Astros 2009 first-round pick Jio Mier in high school in California, but he wound up at UCLA after being drafted by the Phillies in the 41st round that year. He showed flashes of potential before finally coming into his own as a junior, more than doubling his career home run total while lowering his strikeout-walk ratio from 2-1 over his first two seasons to 1-1 this year. Gelalich has a solid all-around tools package. He is a plus runner who plays a solid right field, though his average arm probably fits better in left at the big league level. He has a simple approach, with a wide base, a short stride and the ability to barrel up hard line drives from the left side. He has improved significantly at hitting the ball where it is pitched, taking sliders away to the opposite field while turning on fastballs in. He flashes good power, hitting home runs off the center-field batter's eye and atop the hitting structure at UCLA this spring, but most scouts project him as a solid-average hitter with average power.
27 58 Toronto Blue Jays Mitch Nay 3B Hamilton HS, Chandler, Ariz. Ariz. $1,000,000
Nay started the year slowly, and scouts said he was trying to put his team on his back and pressing at the plate. He struggled offensively and defensively before turning things around in the weeks leading up to the draft. He has been flying up draft boards and could even sneak into the back half of the first round. Nay has a good frame at 6-foot-3 and 195 pounds and shows above-average power potential, as well as a plus arm. Some scouts wonder how much Nay will hit for average, though he did make adjustments this season when he realized pitchers were throwing him a steady diet of curveballs and changeups. He'll have to work to stay at third base, but could handle a move to right field because of his arm strength. Nay moves well laterally but has below-average speed. He's part of a loaded Arizona State recruiting class, but Nay is unlikely to wind up on campus.
28 59 St. Louis Cardinals Steve Bean C Rockwall (Texas) HS Texas $700,000
The University of Texas landed two of the top three high school catching prospects in its recruiting class, though neither Bean nor Wyatt Mathisen figures to arrive on campus. Bean has raised his profile as much as any prospect in Texas this spring, giving himself a chance to go in the top two rounds of the draft. His standout tool is an arm that grades as a 65 on the 20-80 scouting scale. He's improving as a receiver and projects to develop solid skills in that regard. A 6-foot-2, 190-pounder, Bean offers offensive potential from the left side of the plate as well. He makes consistent contact and has the wiry strength to grow into decent power. While he's a below-average runner, he's athletic for a catcher and plays with a lot of energy.
29 60 Toronto Blue Jays Tyler Gonzales RHP Madison HS, San Antonio Texas $750,000
Gonzales has one of the best two-pitch mixes in the entire draft. After operating at 88-92 mph with his fastball in his first scrimmage of the year, he has worked at 93-95 mph and touched 97 consistently in games. He maintains velocity deep into games, pitching at 91-93 mph in the latter stages. He also has a big league slider that sits at 84-88 mph and has reached as high as 90. The nephew of Nationals crosschecker Jimmy Gonzales, Tyler is more wiry than physical at 6-foot-2 and 180 pounds. He generates his electric stuff with a considerable amount of effort in his delivery, which includes a head whack and detracts from his command. He locates his slider better than his fastball, and there's debate as to whether he'll wind up as a starter or a reliever. Gonzales has closer upside and might be at his best if a big league team just let him try to overpower opponents for one or two innings at a time. He does show a changeup while warming up in the bullpen but doesn't use it in games. He's another member of a banner University of Texas recruiting class who doesn't figure to make it to Austin.