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Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player School State Bonus
2 62 Oakland Athletics Bruce Maxwell Birmingham-Southern Ala. $700,000
Maxwell hit his way into one of Division III's top prospects. The lefthanded hitter has strength in his 6-foot-2, 230-pound body and surprising feel for hitting. He lacks athleticism but has arm strength. He's caught enough in college to merit a look behind the plate, but scouts doubt his agility back there. He may wind up as a slugging first baseman.
2 70 San Diego Padres Dane Phillips Oklahoma City Okla. $450,000
Phillips earned all-Big 12 Conference honors as a sophomore at Oklahoma State in 2011, then led the Cape Cod League in RBIs (34) and finished second in the batting race (.349). Because he spent more time at DH than catcher for the Cowboys, though, he wanted to transfer to Arkansas, which had an opening behind the plate. The NCAA denied him a waiver to play immediately rather than sit out for a year, however, so he opted to play at NAIA power Oklahoma City instead. To no one's surprise, Phillips has continued to hit for the Stars and entered the NAIA postseason with .423/.514/.808 numbers. He's a 6-foot-1, 195-pounder with a quality lefthanded swing and an all-fields approach. He should have a least average power once he starts pulling more pitches. The question is where Phillips will play in pro ball. He has shared catching duties at Oklahoma City with senior Chad Carman, and his inexperience continues to show. Phillips has average arm strength but has a lot of work to do on his receiving, and he's not smooth or quick with his actions. The backup plan would be for Phillips to play on an outfield corner, and while his bat would work there it would diminish his value. He's a below-average runner and outfield defender.
8 272 Tampa Bay Rays Luke Maile Kentucky Ky. $133,200
Maile is the biggest power threat on a Kentucky team that won its first 22 games and led the Southeastern Conference for much of the regular season. A 6-foot-3, 220-pound righthanded hitter, Maile has good strength and made some needed adjustments at the plate this year without compromising his solid pop. He has shortened his swing, made more consistent contact and caught up to better fastballs. He has good patience at the plate. Offense definitely is the strength of Maile's game, and scouts remain unconvinced that he can catch regularly in pro ball. He has shared duties behind the plate the last two years with Michael Williams while also seeing extensive time at first base. Maile has average arm strength but a long release, and he doesn't look pretty as a receiver. To his credit, he did throw out 56 percent of basestealers during the regular season. He also moves well enough to make left field a possible destination.
23 713 Cleveland Indians Richard Stock Nebraska Neb.
Drafted as a catcher in the 45th round out of high school three years ago by the Brewers, Stock hurt his shoulder as a freshman at Southern California. He did little catching for the Trojans or in 2011 at Pierce (Calif.) JC, but he had enough action behind the plate this year at Nebraska to pique the interest of scouts. He has more than enough arm strength to catch but would have to improve his receiving and footwork. If he can pull that off, he'd have much more value than he does as a first baseman. The 6-foot-2, 185-pounder offers lefthanded power and makes consistent contact, but scouts don't envision him providing enough offense at first base. The Cardinals drafted his brother Robert in 2009 and converted him from catcher to pitcher this year.