Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1 18 Oakland Athletics Sonny Gray RHP Tenn. $1,540,000
Gray was BA's No. 52 draft prospect as a high school senior in 2008, but a broken ankle, 5-foot-11 frame and Vanderbilt commitment pushed him down the draft until the Cubs took him in the 27th round. He figures to go 26 rounds higher after three seasons with the Commodores. He has added plenty of polish, throwing higher-quality strikes with similar stuff as he showed as a high schooler. His fastball often gets better during games, sitting from 90-95 mph, touching 97 when he needs it. His size keeps him from getting tremendous plane on his fastball, but he has the velocity to pitch up in the zone. High fastballs help set up his best pitch, a power curveball at 82-84 with downer action. His changeup has come along but remains a distant third pitch. Scouts laud his preparation and competitiveness, so while he's tempting as a closer for his two-pitch mix, many scouts expect him to remain a starter. He could stand to repeat his delivery more regularly, and scouts haven't seen much of his change as they'd like. Those are the only chinks in Gray's otherwise impressive armor.
1s 59 Tampa Bay Rays Grayson Garvin LHP Tenn. $370,000
Garvin has performed as well as any Division I pitcher over the last calendar year. He was the Cape Cod League's ERA champion last summer at 5-0, 0.74 with 37 strikeouts in 37 innings. In the spring, he was 11-1, 2.08 and was a perfect 9-0 in Southeastern Conference play until his last start of the regular season. He was named SEC pitcher of the year. Garvin's performance stems from his size, solid stuff and ability to pitch off his fastball. At 6-foot-6, 220 pounds, he gets a good angle on his fastball, pitching downhill, coming inside effectively at 90-92 mph and reaching 94-95 on occasion. His fastball velocity should be a tick above-average as a pro, and he uses his fastball well to set up his solid-average changeup, which has solid fade when he turns it over. His slurvy slider is below-average and rarely generates swings and misses, which limits his upside for many scouts, and he may wind up throwing more of a cutter eventually. Garvin is considered a safe pick, and his summer performance could push him into the first or supplemental first round despite his short breaking ball.
2 64 Baltimore Orioles Jason Esposito 3B Tenn. $600,000
The Royals drafted Esposito in the seventh round out of high school in 2008, but he turned down a reported $1.5 million offer to attend Vanderbilt. He may not get that much this time around, but he'll be close. He got hot offensively this spring at the right time, hitting .376 in SEC play. Esposito is a college version of Marlins prospect Matt Dominguez in that his glove is ahead of his bat. He played some shortstop this spring but is an above-average defender at third with good hands and plus arm strength. Offensively, he has backed up a bit. An average runner with good instincts, he has been less proficient on the bases this year (11 SB, 10 CS) after going 51-for-60 his first two seasons, and stolen bases won't be a significant part of his game as a pro. He has struggled against velocity at times and lost his rhythm, which tends to happen with players with a big leg kick. Some scouts wonder if he's a natural hitter and believe he'll wind up as a utility player, with his glove as his calling card.
3 99 Houston Astros Jack Armstrong Jr. RHP Tenn. $750,000
Armstrong will be one of the draft's most interesting calls. The son of former big league pitcher Jack Armstrong, who was a first-round pick in 1987, Junior has really been a significant contributor only as a sophomore, going 7-4, 4.71 in 2010. He has performed well for two summers in the Cape Cod League, earning the No. 6 prospect spot in 2009 and No. 23 in 2010, and he was a preseason third-team All-American in 2010. He has jumbo size at 6-foot-7, 225 pounds, yet he's athletic enough to do standing backflips. Armstrong hasn't been fully healthy in 2011 and didn't start pitching until mid-March while battling back woes. He hasn't flashed the mid-90s stuff he showed as a freshman, though he has still worked in the low 90s and at his best has shown plenty of stuff against good competition. His best outing came in a loss as he threw four hitless innings against Florida, though he walked four and had more balls (38) than strikes (36). Armstrong throws a curveball and changeup that have their moments, but he's more of a physical athlete than a polished pitcher at this point. Signability will matter a great deal for a player who has been better in the past than he is in 2011.
3 106 Detroit Tigers Aaron Westlake 1B Tenn. $310,000
At 6-foot-4, 230 pounds, Westlake is physically ready for pro ball and was strong enough to have a strong season despite the powered-down bats in college baseball this season. He was forced to redshirt in 2008 due to a blood clotting issue, and he was drafted in the 22nd round as a sophomore last year. The Blue Jays followed him in the Cape Cod League, where he hit .292 with five homers. He had career-best numbers this spring for Vanderbilt as the team's offensive anchor, murdering mistakes, and his eight home runs in league games led the Southeastern Conference. He's patient and strong, generates solid bat speed and is an adequate defender. A gamer, he played catcher (albeit poorly) for an injury-ravaged Vandy team in 2009. He's 22, so he'll probably be pushed through the minors quickly.
3 117 Minnesota Twins Corey Williams LHP Tenn. $575,000
Corey Williams is a 6-foot-2, 195-pounder who was thought to be a tough sign as a redshirt sophomore. Vanderbilt's deep staff meant Williams was limited to a relief role in 2011, and he had the staff's highest ERA. However, he has a live arm, pitching with an average fastball and at times hitting 93-94 with regularity. He has recovered fully from a knee injury that sidelined him in 2010, when he broke his kneecap when he was struck by a line drive. He showed his makeup and competitiveness by getting up and still throwing the runner out on the play that broke his kneecap.
6 187 Washington Nationals Taylor Hill RHP Tenn. $36,000
Hill has pitched in Vanderbilt's rotation for most of his four seasons on campus. A 30th-round pick of the Indians last year, he didn't sign and has maintained his rotation spot despite the Commodores' tremendous pitching depth. Hill earned and has kept his spot due to his ability to pound the strike zone with four pitches, and he has been rewarded with fewer home runs allowed due in part to the new bats. Hill's fastball has sink and boring action and can reach 93-94 mph, though he usually sits 87-92. His slider and changeup are solid-average secondary pitches, and every once in a while he'll mix in a split-finger pitch. Big and physical at 6-foot-4, 225 pounds, Hill profiles as an innings-eating, back-of-the-rotation starter.
6 206 Atlanta Braves Mark Lamm RHP Tenn. $60,000
Lamm is a Tommy John surgery alumnus and fifth-year senior with a 6-foot-4, 215 pound frame. Lamm works at 90-93 mph at his best in relief outings and incorporates a hard slider at 83-85 and a good changeup.
10 317 Detroit Tigers Curt Casali C Tenn. $40,000
Curt Casali has lost his plus arm strength to Tommy John surgery, and his inability to control the running game was one of Vanderbilt's few weaknesses in 2011. He was still a positive for the team with a solid bat and good receiving skills, and he's shown the ability to handle the Commodores' high-octane arms. He has a polished approach at the plate with decent gap power.
14 446 Atlanta Braves Navery Moore RHP Tenn. $400,000
Moore has come back from Tommy John surgery back in high school to become a factor in Vanderbilt's deep bullpen. He made just three appearances as a freshman and 10 as a sophomore, totaling fewer than 18 innings, but has served as Vandy's closer most of this season and had a team-high nine saves. He didn't give up an extra-base hit until the mid-May series against Florida, when he gave up two home runs and a double. While he's not intimidating on the mound at 6-foot-2, 205 pounds, Moore has closer stuff, starting with his fastball. It can be a swing-and-miss pitch in the strike zone, with velocity in the 92-96 mph range, and has solid life. Moore's breaking ball is more of a sweepy slider than a downer breaker, and he has a hard time repeating his release point. Some scouts believe his long arm action will preclude his breaking ball from ever being a swing-and-miss pitch, which could limit him to a set-up role. He also earns high grades for his makeup.
30 928 Minnesota Twins Will Clinard RHP Tenn.
46 1384 Arizona Diamondbacks Joe Loftus OF Tenn.