Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1 1 Pittsburgh Pirates Gerrit Cole RHP Calif. $8,000,000
Cole had one of the best arms in the 2008 draft, when the Yankees drafted him in the first round, but he opted to attend UCLA. In three years with the Bruins, he has matured on and off the field, becoming a clubhouse leader as well as an ace for UCLA's national runner-up team as a sophomore. This spring, he has consistently shown the best pure stuff of any pitcher in this draft, and he has pounded the strike zone, though he struggled to command the inner half during a rough three-outing stretch in April, leading to a fairly pedestrian 5-7, 3.27 mark for the season. At his best, Cole throws three pitches that rate 70 or better on the 20-80 scouting scale. His four-seam fastball sits in the 94-97 range and tops out at 99, and he shows a 92-93 two-seamer that scouts would like to see him use more. His power slider ranges from 86-90 mph with good depth, and he has developed his 85-87 changeup into a third plus to plus-plus pitch this year, though it had more tumbling action earlier than the year than it did down the stretch. In high school, some scouts were concerned about the effort in Cole's delivery, but he has smoothed it out; most scouts generally regard it as clean, repeatable and simple now. He has a physical, durable frame and a competitive but composed mound demeanor--another change from his prep days. Scouts think Cole could rocket to the majors as a closer throwing 98-100 mph, but the consensus is that he has all the makings of a frontline starter.
1 3 Arizona Diamondbacks Trevor Bauer RHP Calif. $3,400,000
After graduating high school early to enroll at UCLA in the spring of 2009, Bauer quickly found his way into the Bruins' weekend rotation, and went on to break school records for career wins (32 and counting) and strikeouts (432) by the middle of his junior year. Bauer is as unconventional as he is dominant. He takes an intellectual approach to his craft, studying advanced concepts like biomechanics, effective velocity and pitch tunneling. He is a long-toss devotee who works with rubber tubes before and during his starts. He idolizes and patterns himself after another slight righthander with electric stuff: Tim Lincecum. Like Lincecum, he generates premium velocity using extreme torque, and while some scouts worry about the head movement and recoil in his delivery, others say his arm action is loose and his mechanics add deception. Bauer has the deepest repertoire of any pitcher in the draft. On his worst days, he still holds 91-93 mph fastball velocity deep into games, and he often tops out at 95-96. He has exceptional feel for a sharp, downer curveball that rates as plus to plus-plus. His changeup is above-average, and he mixes in an occasional split-finger and flashes a slider. He also throws what he calls a "reverse slider," which runs in on lefthanded hitters at 85-87 mph--and some scouts say that is plus, too. Bauer relishes striking hitters out, so he throws a lot of pitches. He usually works deep into games (and threw five straight complete games in April and May). That workload concerns some scouts, but others think his arm is in exceptional shape and point out that he conditions himself to throw a lot. He has top-of-the-rotation upside and could move quickly, but he is adamant about continuing his own training regimen in pro ball, which will turn some clubs off.
15 454 Arizona Diamondbacks Steven Rodriguez C Calif.
UCLA catcher Steve Rodriguez gets plenty of exposure receiving for blue-chippers Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer, and his ability to handle their premium stuff will get him drafted despite meager offensive numbers (.216/.312/.254 with five extra-base hits through 134 at-bats). Rodriguez excels at receiving and blocking, and his average arm plays up because of its accuracy. He has a durable 6-foot-1, 200-pound frame and could be a big league backup if his lefthanded bat ever comes around.
15 456 Kansas City Royals Dean Espy 1B Calif.
Physically mature at 6-foot-1, 210 pounds, Dean Espy lacks the raw power to project as an everyday first baseman in the big leagues, but he has strength in his line-drive swing and a chance to hit for average, with occasional home run pop. He has played third base in the past, but his range is better suited for first.
20 627 San Francisco Giants Mitchell Beacom LHP Calif.
UCLA lefthander Mitchell Beacom has a future in pro ball as a left-on-left specialist, though his stuff is underwhelming. His funky delivery and sidearm slot give him deception, and his 85-88 mph fastball has some sink and run. He also uses a Frisbee slider that is adequate against lefthanders. He needs to develop a viable changeup if he is to succeed against righthanded hitters in pro ball.
34 1040 St. Louis Cardinals Tyler Rahmatulla 2B Calif.
Bruins second baseman Tyler Rahmatulla has been snake-bitten over the last two years. He had a strong sophomore season (.328/.434/.509 with seven homers and 19 doubles) as UCLA's No. 3 hitter, but he missed the Bruins' run to the College World Series finals after breaking his wrist in the post-super regional dogpile celebration. When he returned last fall, Rahmatulla misstepped while taking ground balls in the Bruins' first workout, breaking a bone in the top of his foot and sidelining him for eight weeks. Then his season ended after just 18 games due to academic ineligibility. He has a chance to be an average defender at second base with an average line-drive bat and a blue-collar mentality, but his stock has dropped.
39 1185 Los Angeles Angels Chris Giovinazzo OF Calif.
45 1361 Milwaukee Brewers Adrian Williams SS Calif.
47 1425 Los Angeles Angels Brandon Lodge RHP Calif.