Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 91 Pittsburgh Pirates Alex Dickerson 1B Indiana Ind. $380,700
Dickerson established his hitting credentials by winning the Big Ten Conference triple crown (.419-24-75) as a sophomore, then batting .500 in a nine-game stint in the Cape Cod League before moving on to Team USA. He hasn't put up the same numbers this spring, as he has battled back problems and teams have pitched around him. He's still one of the better bats available in the draft. The 6-foot-3, 225-pound lefthander has pure hitting ability, average to plus power to all parts of the ballpark and an advanced approach. Pitchers rarely have challenged Dickerson on the inner half, and scouts have lauded his willingness to use the opposite field. He's a below-average runner with substandard range and a fringy arm in left field, and he's going to have to work harder on defense to avoid a move to first base or DH. His back issues don't help in that regard, and he had surgery to repair a bulging disc while he was in high school.
2 92 Seattle Mariners Kevin Cron 1B Mountain Pointe HS, Phoenix Ariz.
C.J. Cron isn't the only Cron in this draft with a huge bat. His younger brother shattered the Arizona high school career home run record this year, finishing with 59, including 27 this season as he helped his team win a state title. Cron is almost a clone of his older brother. He has a softer body at 6-foot-3 and 240 pounds, but it's all about the hitting and power tools for those two. Kevin has some arm strength but will be limited to first base because of his lack of athleticism and below-average speed. High school first basemen that hit from the right side of the plate aren't usually premium picks, but Cron's bat is that intriguing. He has good bat speed and well above-average raw power. Rumors had him looking for a seven-figure signing bonus, and if he doesn't get an offer to his liking he'd be happy to honor his commitment to Texas Christian.
3 93 Arizona Diamondbacks Justin Bianco OF Peters Township HS, Canonsburg, Pa. Pa. $369,000
A sturdy 6-foot-1, 195 pounds, outfielder Justin Bianco is a Pittsburgh signee with solid tools across the board. While nothing jumps out, scouts like his present strength and think he is not yet physically mature. He's a solid-average runner, and scouts also like the way he plays the game.
4 94 Baltimore Orioles Mike Wright RHP East Carolina N.C. $363,300
In his first full season in the weekend rotation, Wright has been one of the Pirates' better arms. He has a good frame at 6-foot-5, 195 pounds and has a chance to remain a starter. He works with a sinker/slider combination, getting ground ball outs and keeping the ball in the park rather than racking up strikeouts. His sinker will work in the low 90s, and he throws strikes with both his fastball and slider. He has flashed a decent changeup this season, though it needs more consistency. Scouts like his competitiveness on the mound. He feeds off big situations and struck out Rice's Anthony Rendon twice, challenging him inside. Wright is probably best suited to a relief role and could get popped in the sixth round, but if a team thinks he can start he could go a little higher.
5 95 Kansas City Royals Bryan Brickhouse RHP The Woodlands (Texas) HS Texas $1,500,000
Brickhouse is the latest strong-armed pitcher to come out of The Woodlands, which also spawned first-rounders Kyle Drabek (2006) and Jameson Taillon (2010). He won't go quite as high in the draft, and the Tar Heel State native may not be signable away from a North Carolina scholarship if he doesn't. Brickhouse will show good stuff at times, but he doesn't always maintain it past a few innings or throw strikes with it. He has two plus pitches in a 90-93 mph fastball that peaks at 95 and a spike curveball with 11-5 break. The curve sometimes morphs into a slider, and he has the beginnings of a changeup. Six-foot-2 and 190 pounds, he's not particularly big or athletic. He has effort in his delivery and doesn't always stay on top of his pitches. If he can develop consistency, Brickhouse might be a No. 3 starter. He also profiles well as a late-inning reliever who could focus on attacking hitters with his fastball and breaking ball. He helped his cause with a strong performance in the Texas 5-A state playoffs, striking out 11, 12 and 13 batters in his three starts.
6 96 Washington Nationals Matt Purke LHP Texas Christian Texas $2,750,000
Purke opened the year ranked right behind Anthony Rendon and Gerrit Cole as a potential No. 1 overall pick, but where he'll go in the draft is now wide open. He left an April 16 start against San Diego State after his fastball dropped to 82 mph in the fifth inning, and was diagnosed with shoulder bursitis four days later by orthopedist Dr. James Andrews. Purke didn't pitch again until he threw three shutout innings against New Mexico on May 19. The 14th overall pick in the 2009 draft, he agreed to a $6 million deal with the Rangers, but Major League Baseball (which controlled the club's finances at the time) wouldn't approve the deal because of the team's financial problems. So Purke joined the Horned Frogs and led them to their first-ever College World Series berth in 2010, leading NCAA Division I in wins while going 16-0, 3.02 and winning Baseball America's Freshman of the Year award. He took the summer and fall off and was hampered this season by back and blister issues. Some scouts believe his shoulder problems came because he didn't build up enough arm strength. Others blame his delivery, as the 6-foot-4, 180-pounder slings the ball from a low three-quarters arm slot. His mechanics deteriorated this spring, as he worked from an even lower angle and threw across his body more than usual, causing his stuff to flatten out. When he's healthy, Purke pitches off a lively 91-94 mph fastball that reaches 96 and backs it up with an above-average slider. His changeup has the potential to become a solid third pitch, and he has average command. He exhibited his competitiveness by gutting through nine starts and going 5-1, 1.44. With concerns about his health and signability--he possesses added leverage as a draft-eligible sophomore--it's unclear where Purke might go. He may have to re-establish his value in summer ball, as Anthony Ranaudo did a year ago after a disappointing spring at Louisiana State. He rebounded in the Cape Cod League and got a $2.55 million bonus from the Red Sox as the 39th pick.
7 97 Cleveland Indians Jake Sisco RHP Merced (Calif.) JC Calif. $325,000
Junior college pitchers, especially those in Northern California, don't typically go off the board early. Sisco should be an exception, as some scouts think he has a chance to be special. He was the best junior college pitcher in the state, thanks to a fastball that sits at 92-93 mph and gets up to 95. He shows the makings of four plus pitches, with his fastball, curveball, slider and changeup, though he needs to improve the consistency of all his pitches. He has a nice pitcher's build at 6-foot-3 and 200 pounds and has shown more maturity this year on the mound. A 37th-round pick by the Giants out of high school in Modesto last year, Sisco could go as high as the third round this year.
8 98 Chicago Cubs Zeke DeVoss OF Miami Fla. $500,000
A somewhat polarizing player for scouts, DeVoss is an eligible sophomore who turned down a late-round offer from the Red Sox out of the 2009 draft. He was one of Miami's few impact offensive players in an up-and-down season, teaming with Nathan Melendres at the top of the lineup and setting the table ably, though his swing is inconsistent. He's not physical but is a good athlete who is less polished than the average college player in Florida. He's one of college baseball's faster runners, and his speed plays offensively. When he's going right he'll sting line drives to the gaps and put his speed to use on the basepaths. DeVoss played shortstop in high school and has shifted between left field and second base. He hasn't played center field much in deference to Melendres, making it difficult for scouts who think that's his best position. His speed and athleticism figure to make him the first Miami player off the board.
9 99 Houston Astros Jack Armstrong Jr. RHP Vanderbilt Tenn. $750,000
Armstrong will be one of the draft's most interesting calls. The son of former big league pitcher Jack Armstrong, who was a first-round pick in 1987, Junior has really been a significant contributor only as a sophomore, going 7-4, 4.71 in 2010. He has performed well for two summers in the Cape Cod League, earning the No. 6 prospect spot in 2009 and No. 23 in 2010, and he was a preseason third-team All-American in 2010. He has jumbo size at 6-foot-7, 225 pounds, yet he's athletic enough to do standing backflips. Armstrong hasn't been fully healthy in 2011 and didn't start pitching until mid-March while battling back woes. He hasn't flashed the mid-90s stuff he showed as a freshman, though he has still worked in the low 90s and at his best has shown plenty of stuff against good competition. His best outing came in a loss as he threw four hitless innings against Florida, though he walked four and had more balls (38) than strikes (36). Armstrong throws a curveball and changeup that have their moments, but he's more of a physical athlete than a polished pitcher at this point. Signability will matter a great deal for a player who has been better in the past than he is in 2011.
10 100 Milwaukee Brewers Drew Gagnon RHP Long Beach State Calif. $340,000
Though he has yet to post a winning season in college, Gagnon has improved each year at Long Beach, lowering his ERA from 6.28 to 3.28 to 2.80. He showed good feel for pitching in the Cape Cod League last summer, leading the circuit with five wins, and he carried that momentum into his junior year. Gagnon has a prototypical 6-foot-4, 195-pound frame and an easy arm action, but his delivery can get a bit too mechanical at times, and scouts would like to see him loosen up and just throw. He pitches heavily off a lively 90-93 mph fastball that has peaked at 94 this spring, and he pounds both sides of the strike zone with it. Gagnon has worked to improve his feel for his breaking stuff, as he throws both a slider and a curveball, and for much of his career they tended to blend into each other. At his best, he shows a 79-82 hammer curveball and an 82-85 slider, each with distinct shapes. His 82-85 changeup is also an average pitch. Gagnon is still learning to put hitters away with his secondary stuff (he has 183 strikeouts in 245 career innings) and still learning to win, but he has the ingredients to be a workhorse mid- to late-rotation starter in the big leagues.
11 101 New York Mets Logan Verrett RHP Baylor Texas $425,000
Verrett positioned himself as a possible first-round pick with a strong performance in the Cape Cod League last summer. He hasn't quite pitched up to that standard this spring, though he did finish the regular season on a roll, not allowing an earned run in his final 21 innings. Verrett doesn't have an out pitch, but he has three solid offerings and mixes speeds and plans well. His best pitch is his slider, which generates some swings as misses. He has an average fastball, pitching at 88-92 mph and topping out at 94, though it lacks life. He gets more sink on his changeup. A 6-foot-3, 185-pounder, Verrett repeats his sound delivery well and throws strikes. Scouts also like the way he competes. Though he's athletic, he struggles to control the running game. While he showed a 93-95 mph fastball when he worked out of the bullpen as a freshman, Verrett has a future as a No. 3 starter.
12 102 Florida Marlins Connor Barron SS Sumrall (Miss.) HS Miss.
Barron helped lead Sumrall to a 67-game winning streak that ended last year and moved from third base to shortstop this spring. He helped the team to its fourth straight state 3A title and batted .490 with eight home runs He has matured physically as a senior, going from 6 feet, 170 pounds to 6-foot-3, 195 pounds now. He has remained an above-average runner, and he has the arm strength for shortstop. Throw in his fluid lefthanded swing, and Barron has gone from a solid local follow to a genuine pop-up guy who is making Southern Mississippi sweat. He would replace B.A. Vollmuth as the Golden Eagles' shortstop next season, if he makes it to school. Evaluators compare him to Rays big leaguer Reid Brignac, who was a second-round pick in 2004, and Barron now could go close to that range. He has shown surprising raw power, and scouts believe in his knack for hitting as well as above-average athleticism.
13 103 Los Angeles Dodgers Pratt Maynard C North Carolina State N.C. $315,000
The first thing scouts notice about Maynard is his hitting ability from the left side. He hit just .273 as a sophomore, but with 11 home runs and more walks (64) than strikeouts (42). The new bats in college baseball this season haven't seemed to affect him, as he was hitting .330/.408/.481 in 212 at-bats. His power is more in the form of doubles this season and scouts think he'll continue to show more line-drive power than home runs as a pro. He hasn't walked as much this season, but still shows good plate discipline. The doubts surround Maynard's ability to catch, though teams will give him every chance given the lack of depth at the position. He needs polish in all facets defensively, and if he has to move to a corner, his lack of home run power dents his profile. If a team believes in Maynard behind the plate, he could go off the board in the fifth round.
14 104 Los Angeles Angels Nick Maronde LHP Florida Fla. $309,600
Maronde entered his senior high school season in Kentucky as the No. 19 player on BA's Top 100 high school prospects list. He was a 43rd-round pick by the Athletics in 2008 because of the strength of his commitment to Florida, and he got 11 starts as a freshman, leading the team in strikeouts. He struggled as a sophomore, relegated to a relief role and posting a 6.15 ERA. He found success as a reliever this year, dominating at times with an above-average fastball and aggressive approach. Maronde's fastball has reached 96 and sits 90-94 mph, and he has shown the ability to pitch off it, at times to the exclusion of his other stuff. He had a recent outing with 26 straight fastballs and used no other pitch. His control of his fastball and slider are both better this year, and at times his slider is average. He hasn't used his changeup much, though he threw it as a freshman and in high school. His 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame and potential three-pitch mix make it likely he'll return to a starting role once he's drafted, though he could move quickly as a power-armed lefthanded reliever.
15 105 Oakland Athletics B.A. Vollmuth 3B Southern Mississippi Miss. $304,200
Vollmuth hit all of three home runs as a high school senior, so Southern Mississippi coaches were surprised when he stepped in as a freshman for injured team leader Brian Dozier and hit eight home runs in just 97 at-bats. He helped lead the Golden Eagles to their first College World Series bid, then bashed 20 homers as a sophomore. Vollmuth has battled the new bats and a hip injury in 2011, and moved off shortstop to the less-demanding third base. At 6-foot-4 and a listed 200 pounds, he may wind up outgrowing third and moving to a corner outfield spot--or first base if his below-average speed further deteriorates. With an accurate, above-average arm, that would waste of one of his better tools. Vollmuth still has looseness in his swing, and he has tremendous leverage. He's always going to swing and miss, but instincts and savvy have helped him improve his hitting ability over his college career. He has toned down an exaggerated leg kick, and while he remains streaky, he has gained consistency.
16 106 Detroit Tigers Aaron Westlake 1B Vanderbilt Tenn. $310,000
At 6-foot-4, 230 pounds, Westlake is physically ready for pro ball and was strong enough to have a strong season despite the powered-down bats in college baseball this season. He was forced to redshirt in 2008 due to a blood clotting issue, and he was drafted in the 22nd round as a sophomore last year. The Blue Jays followed him in the Cape Cod League, where he hit .292 with five homers. He had career-best numbers this spring for Vanderbilt as the team's offensive anchor, murdering mistakes, and his eight home runs in league games led the Southeastern Conference. He's patient and strong, generates solid bat speed and is an adequate defender. A gamer, he played catcher (albeit poorly) for an injury-ravaged Vandy team in 2009. He's 22, so he'll probably be pushed through the minors quickly.
17 107 Colorado Rockies Pete O'Brien C Bethune-Cookman Fla.
O'Brien emerged as a top college catching prospect last year, first when he hit 20 homers for Bethune-Cookman, then when he earned a spot on USA Baseball's college national team. On a team with many of the top hitters in the country, O'Brien hit four home runs and showed premium righthanded power, his best tool. His hitting has regressed as a junior, with more swings and misses and less feel for the barrel. While Bethune-Cookman doesn't have any arms near the quality of Team USA's, O'Brien nevertheless has struggled with his receiving this spring, as he did last summer. He's not a great athlete and struggles to receive breaking balls to his right. He has arm strength but lacks fluid footwork. Many scouts believe he has no chance to be a big league catcher, which would relegate him to first base. He has shown the work ethic and makeup needed to handle a staff, and there's some thought that improved core strength and more flexibility could make him passable as a catcher/first baseman in the Jake Fox mold.
18 108 Toronto Blue Jays John Stilson RHP Texas A&M Texas $500,000
Stilson set a Texarkana (Texas) JC record by winning 12 games as a freshman in 2009, then led NCAA Division I in ERA (0.80) and ranked second in strikeout per nine inning (13.5) in his first season at Texas A&M last spring. He has made another successful transition this year, moving from the bullpen back into the rotation and serving as the Aggies' ace. His fastball ranges from 91-94 mph, and it touched 96 when he worked as a reliever. He has incredible feel for a dynamite changeup that outranks his heater as his best pitch. He throws a hard breaking ball, and he has the ability to vary the angle and shape of the pitch to make it a slider or a curveball. Six-foot-3 and 195 pounds, Stilson is a quality athlete who also starred in football and basketball in high school and played shortstop at Texarkana. He's an intense competitor who relishes the responsibility that comes with being a Friday starter or a closer. Stilson's delivery is the only reason he isn't mentioned with the top tier of college pitching prospects. He catapults off the mound and throws with some effort, but that doesn't prevent him from filling the strike zone. If the team that drafts him puts him back in the bullpen, he could be the first player from the 2011 draft to reach the majors. But Stilson has legitimate value as a No. 2 or 3 starter, and he'll probably get an initial opportunity to thrive in that role in pro ball.
19 109 St. Louis Cardinals C.J. McElroy Jr. OF Clear Creek HS, League City, Texas Texas $510,000
The son of longtime big league reliever Chuck McElroy, outfielder C.J. McElroy draws comparisons to Michael Bourn. His plus-plus speed stands out both on the diamond and on the gridiron. A running back who ran for 1,523 yards and accounted for 28 touchdowns last fall, he signed a football scholarship to play wide receiver at Houston. He also finished seventh at the Texas 5-A track meet in the long jump. At 5-foot-9 and 165 pounds, McElroy won't have much power, but he has a solid righthanded stroke, good pitch-recognition skills and the ability to handle velocity. He's a big-time stolen base threat and covers a lot of ground in center field. His arm is below-average.
20 110 Chicago White Sox Jeff Soptic RHP Johnson County (Kan.) CC Kan. $320,000
Few pitchers in this draft can light up a radar gun like Soptic can, but his lack of consistency likely will keep him out of the first couple of rounds. The 6-foot-6, 220-pounder's arm works easily, as he effortlessly delivers fastballs at 93-96 mph and peaks at 100. Velocity is the one constant with Soptic. His four-seam fastball is fairly straight and gets hit harder than it should. He'll flash a plus slider at times, but it's below-average more often than not. His changeup is a distant third pitch. Unless he can significantly improve his control and secondary pitches, Soptic probably will have to settle for being a reliever as a pro. Nevertheless, his arm strength and body are hard to ignore. Drafted in the 43rd round out of high school by the Royals but unselected when he maxed out at 94 mph as a freshman, Soptic will attend Missouri if he doesn't turn pro.
21 111 Boston Red Sox Jordan Weems C Columbus (Ga.) HS Ga. $500,000
Weems has taken advantage of his bloodlines, his own improved play, the down year in Georgia and the dearth of catching to jump up draft boards. He helped lead Columbus High to a state championship in 2010, and he helped the team reach the state 3-A semifinals this season. He hopes to become the third member of his family to get drafted, joining father Rick (1980, 15th round, Cardinals) and brother Chase (2007, sixth round, Yankees). Weems is tall and lanky at a listed 6-foot-3, 180 pounds, and lacks present strength. Scouts have to project his hitting ability and power because of his lack of physicality. His arm gets easy above-average grades, and he posts sub-2.0-second pop times. He's a decent receiver now who projects to be average with more strength. Weems is committed to Georgia State.
22 112 San Diego Padres Matt Andriese RHP UC Riverside Calif. $270,000
Scouts were intrigued by Andriese's frame and sinker coming out of high school in Redlands, Calif., in 2008, when he was a 37th-round pick. He has boosted his stock in three years at UC Riverside. He struggled as a sophomore, going 5-5, 4.95, but gained confidence in the Cape Cod League last summer and has gotten outs much more consistently this spring. Andriese has a physical, durable frame at 6-foot-3, 205 pounds. His delivery has stiffness and length, and he's just a fair athlete. He holds the 90-93 mph velocity on his slightly above-average fastball deep into games, and he flashes a sharp, late power curveball, though he needs to repeat it more consistently for it to become a true plus pitch. He also throws an average split-change with late tumble. Andriese generally has good command, but it can lapse at times. He projects as a durable mid-rotation starter.
23 113 Texas Rangers Kyle Castro RHP Pleasant Grove HS, Elk Grove, Calif. Calif. $267,300
Righthander Kyle Castro has a projectable, athletic frame at 6-foot-4 and 185 pounds. He also starred on his high school football team as a defensive back and led the state with 12 interceptions last season. When he's not pitching, he plays third base and hits in the middle of the order. Teams prefer him on the mound, though, where he sits in the 88-90 mph range, topping out at 92. He throws a curveball that is inconsistent but shows flashes of being an above-average pitch. His mechanics are free and easy because of his athleticism, which along with his competitiveness and lack of a college commitment may push him up draft boards.
24 114 Cincinnati Reds Tony Cingrani LHP Rice Texas $210,000
Tony Cingrani broke former big leaguer Tim Byrdak's single-season and career strikeout records at South Suburban (Ill.) JC, then followed Byrdak's path and transferred to Rice. After he posted an 8.59 ERA in six starts as a junior, the Owls overhauled Cingrani's delivery and moved him to the bullpen, and his transformation has been dramatic. The 6-foot-5, 205-pound lefthander has quickened his arm action and is staying more compact and on top of his pitches, and he's working at 92-94 mph and touching 97 with his fastball. He finished the regular season with a 1.92 ERA and 62 strikeouts in 52 innings. He pitches mostly off his heater, though the hope is that his below-average slider will improve once he gets more consistent innings in pro ball. He's one of the more attractive senior signs in the draft.
25 115 Atlanta Braves Kyle Kubitza 3B Texas State Texas $261,000
His brother Austin was a seventh-round pick by the Pirates last year, and Kyle Kubitza should go in the same range this June. (Austin decided to attend Rice, where he has been the Owls' best pitcher as a freshman, and projects a possible first-rounder in 2013.) As a 6-foot-4, 190-pound lefthanded hitter with strength and athleticism, Kyle profiles well at third base. He offers power and patience at the plate, but scouts would like to see him maintain a consistent set-up rather than tinkering with his hitting mechanics. Likewise, they'd like to see more reliable defense at third base, where he made 22 errors in 55 regular-season games. He has the hands, arm and agility to play the hot corner if he can maintain his concentration.
26 116 San Francisco Giants Ricky Oropesa 1B Southern California Calif. $550,000
A heralded two-way recruit, Oropesa scrapped pitching his freshman year and quickly became one of the Pac-10's premier power hitters, slugging 33 home runs over his first two seasons and leading the Cape Cod League with seven long balls in 2010. He also led the Cape with 52 strikeouts, after fanning 51 times in 235 at-bats for the Trojans. He has decreased his strikeout rate and increased his walk rate this spring, but his power numbers have also dropped with the less-potent metal bats--he has just six homers through 186 at-bats. Still, Oropesa is a strong, physical specimen at 6-foot-3, 225 pounds, and he has well above-average raw power from the left side. He'll need to become a better hitter because he still struggles against lefthanded pitching and is prone to chasing breaking balls. His swing gets long at times, but he has enough bat speed to punish even premium fastballs. Some scouts think he has a chance to become an average hitter in time. Oropesa has a plus-plus arm but needs a lot of work on his glove positioning and fundamentals at third base. He profiles better as an average defensive first baseman, where his arm is largely wasted. He's a well below-average runner.
27 117 Minnesota Twins Corey Williams LHP Vanderbilt Tenn. $575,000
Corey Williams is a 6-foot-2, 195-pounder who was thought to be a tough sign as a redshirt sophomore. Vanderbilt's deep staff meant Williams was limited to a relief role in 2011, and he had the staff's highest ERA. However, he has a live arm, pitching with an average fastball and at times hitting 93-94 with regularity. He has recovered fully from a knee injury that sidelined him in 2010, when he broke his kneecap when he was struck by a line drive. He showed his makeup and competitiveness by getting up and still throwing the runner out on the play that broke his kneecap.
28 118 New York Yankees Jordan Cote RHP Winnisquam HS, Northfield, N.H. N.H. $725,000
Righthander Jordan Cote, at 6-foot-5 and 205 pounds, has a projectable frame that scouts dream about. His fastball sits at 88-90 mph and touches 92, and adding strength and pitching in warmer weather should help bump his velocity, especially because he has great hand speed. His arm action is clean, but his mechanics need to be refined, as he has long levers and is still growing into his body. Inability to repeat his delivery restricts him from throwing a consistent breaking ball. Cote has better feel for his curveball than his slider, though he shows the ability to spin the ball. He hasn't needed to throw his changeup and it's a work in progress. For his size more than his stuff, Cote has drawn comparisons to Chris Carpenter, who grew up about an hour from Cote's high school in New Hampshire. Cote is committed to Coastal Carolina, and though the high school arms from Massachusetts have gotten more attention, one scout said Cote has the highest ceiling of any pitcher in the Northeast. He should get taken between the eighth and 12th rounds, with late-spring buzz that he could be going higher.
29 119 Tampa Bay Rays Johnny Eierman OF Warsaw (Mo.) HS Mo. $550,000
A product of a central Missouri town with a population of 2,100, Eierman boosted his draft stock by showing impressive raw tools on a bigger stage last summer. He made the rounds of the showcase circuit, posting the second-best 60-yard dash time (6.41 seconds) at the Area Code Games and launching balls in batting practice. Eierman has well above-average bat speed to match hit foot speed, though he'll have to make adjustments against better pitching. He has a long righthanded stroke with an inconsistent load, and he's too aggressive at the plate. If he can iron out his swing, he could be an average hitter with plus power. A shortstop for his high school team coached by his father John, Eierman won't stay in the infield in pro ball. He lacks the hands and actions for second base, and his average arm may not be enough for third. The 6-foot-1, 195-pounder has the tools to become a solid center fielder. A Louisiana State recruit, he'll need time to develop but has a high ceiling.
30 120 Philadelphia Phillies Adam Morgan LHP Alabama Ala. $250,000
Alabama's roster is thin on tools, and the Crimson Tide may not have more than one player drafted in the first 10 rounds: Morgan, who has had flashes of brilliance mixed with low points. He has pitched in the rotation for three seasons, and his solid size and good arm action entice scouts. His delivery, arm action and delivery evoke Cliff Lee, though he doesn't have Lee's stuff or command. Morgan does pound the strike zone and at times pitches downhill with a 90-92 mph fastball. He also has flashed an above-average slider that will touch 84 mph, and his changeup flashes average as well. So why doesn't Morgan dominate? His fastball more regularly sits in the 87-90 mph range, and even at lower velocity it can flatten out. He has a stiff front leg in his delivery that at times prevents him from keeping the ball down, and his slider is inconsistent. He has been durable this season, though his delivery does raise injury concerns with some scouts.