Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 61 Pittsburgh Pirates Josh Bell OF Dallas Jesuit HS Texas $5,000,000
Bell has the most usable power among high school players in the 2011 draft, and he provides it from both sides of the plate. He has been switch-hitting since he was 5 years old, and he's equally effective from both sides of the plate. Armed with quick hands, strength and an advanced approach, the 6-foot-3, 206-pounder projects as a plus hitter for both average and power. A cracked left kneecap prevented him from proving himself on the showcase circuit last summer, but he recovered to star at the World Wood Bat Championship in October. Bell's other tools aren't as dynamic as his bat, and he'll have to move from center field once he turns pro, but he profiles nicely as a corner outfielder. He's an average runner who may have enough arm strength to play right field. Bell is a good student whose mother is a college professor and who will be advised by the Boras Corp., so it may cost a team dearly to pry him away from a Texas scholarship. His offensive upside still will draw plenty of suitors in the middle of the first round.
2 62 Seattle Mariners Brad Miller SS Clemson S.C. $750,000
Teams pursued Miller out of an Orlando high school, but his signability pushed him to the 39th round. He started at shortstop for most of his first two years for Clemson, and spent the last two summers with USA Baseball's college national team. After failing to register an extra-base hit in the summer of 2009, he hit .441 last summer with four doubles and a home run. Miller kept hitting this spring, especially after returning from a broken finger. He led the Atlantic Coast Conference in batting (.431) and on-base percentage (.536), earning ACC player of the year honors despite an odd approach that evokes Craig Counsell. He holds his hands high to start his stance, and while he doesn't always get his hands into an ideal hitting position, he has excellent hand-eye coordination and keeps his bat in the strike zone a long time. He's been inconsistent defensively, including 31 errors as a sophomore, and has had inconsistent throwing mechanics. He has been steadier this spring but probably fits better at second base. He's a solid-average runner, if not a tick above-average, and has good baserunning instincts. He's a baseball rat with good makeup.
3 63 Arizona Diamondbacks Anthony Meo RHP Coastal Carolina S.C. $625,000
Meo was part of a stacked 2008 prep class in Connecticut and Rhode Island, a group that included Vanderbilt's Jason Esposito and UConn stars Matt Barnes and George Springer. Meo threw 91-92 mph in high school but has bumped his fastball up to 96 mph in college, regularly sitting in the 93-94 range. He's quick-armed and live-bodied at 6-foot-2, 185 pounds, with a lean frame that hasn't added much weight over the years. His curveball is quick and short with downer break, and he's starting to harness the command of both pitches. Meo's changeup remains "underdeveloped," as one scout put it, and while his delivery isn't maximum effort, it's not smooth either. He throws strikes but doesn't locate enough to have the command clubs look for in starters. He should go out in the first two rounds as a starter but likely will wind up as a reliever.
4 64 Baltimore Orioles Jason Esposito 3B Vanderbilt Tenn. $600,000
The Royals drafted Esposito in the seventh round out of high school in 2008, but he turned down a reported $1.5 million offer to attend Vanderbilt. He may not get that much this time around, but he'll be close. He got hot offensively this spring at the right time, hitting .376 in SEC play. Esposito is a college version of Marlins prospect Matt Dominguez in that his glove is ahead of his bat. He played some shortstop this spring but is an above-average defender at third with good hands and plus arm strength. Offensively, he has backed up a bit. An average runner with good instincts, he has been less proficient on the bases this year (11 SB, 10 CS) after going 51-for-60 his first two seasons, and stolen bases won't be a significant part of his game as a pro. He has struggled against velocity at times and lost his rhythm, which tends to happen with players with a big leg kick. Some scouts wonder if he's a natural hitter and believe he'll wind up as a utility player, with his glove as his calling card.
5 65 Kansas City Royals Cam Gallagher C Manheim Township HS, Lancaster, Pa. Pa. $750,000
At 6-foot-3, 210 pounds, Gallagher doesn't look like a high school player who can stick behind the plate, but until this spring his defense was considered superior to his bat. He has had a good season and showed improvement at the plate while endearing himself to scouts by playing with energy and taking batting practice with wood bats after games. Because he's big, Gallagher's swing can get long at times, but his strength helps him get by. He has strong hands and arms that allow him to hit to all fields. Scouts would like to see more feel at the plate from him, but he has the potential to bring an average hit tool and plus power to a premium defensive position. Gallagher's older brother Austin is a Dodgers farmhand, and they come from a baseball family. Though he is committed to East Carolina, the younger Gallagher seems interested in starting his pro career and could go in the first three rounds.
6 66 Philadelphia Phillies Roman Quinn SS Port St. Joe (Fla.) HS Fla. $775,000
A Florida State signee, Quinn was a must-see at relatively remote Port St. Joe, on the Florida Panhandle. The fastest player in the BA Top 200, he's a true top-of-the-scale runner with game-changing speed. He's a high school shortstop who has the arm strength (solid-average) and hands to stay in the infield. Quinn has the athleticism to play second base, but his speed plays better in center field, which is where more scouts project him to wind up. He's a righthanded hitter who has been learning to switch-hit over the last year. The 2010 East Coast Pro showcase was his first game action hitting lefthanded, and he was overmatched, so he backed off switch-hitting for a time. He resumed it this spring and has improved from the left side. Scouts like his righthanded swing, which produces surprising pop. His 5-foot-9, 165-pound size may drive him down draft boards, but he had helium and was unlikely to get out of the third round.
7 67 Cleveland Indians Dillon Howard RHP Searcy (Ark.) HS Ark. $1,850,000
Howard established himself as the top prospect in Arkansas early on, earning all-state honors as a sophomore, and has maintained that through his senior season. He has a strong track record in showcases and summer ball. He hasn't had a boffo senior season but has maintained his status as a potential late first-round or sandwich pick. At his best, Howard throws a fastball with above-average life and velocity. It can sit 92-94 and at times has heavy sink. Command can be an issue, but he's a solid athlete whose arm works well, so scouts can project average big league fastball command. He's played catcher, shortstop and third base in high school and is a baseball rat who has passion for the game. His secondary pitches, a curveball and changeup, have their moments but have been inconsistent this season. He has more feel for his secondary offerings than many prep pitchers, which has some scouts surprised that he hasn't had a more dominant season. Some have raised concerns about his mound demeanor and energy level, but it's unlikely he falls far enough for his Arkansas commitment to come into play.
8 68 Chicago Cubs Dan Vogelbach 1B Bishop Verot HS, Fort Myers, Fla. Fla. $1,600,000
Vogelbach is not a good runner, but he helped Bishop Verot win the Florida 3-A championship for the first time since 1994 when he scampered home from second base with the winning run on a deflected single by Hudson Boyd--a likely top-two-rounds pick as a pitcher. Vogelbach hit 17 homers in 32 games and has some of the best lefthanded power in the draft due to excellent strength and a sound, loose swing. He put it on display last December at the annual Power Showcase--the event made famous by Bryce Harper's 502-foot homer--by launching one 508 feet with a metal bat and won the event. He is more than a masher, with solid hitting ability and a fairly polished approach. But at 6 feet, 240 pounds, Vogelbach has work to do physically and will never be thought of as athletic. He has trimmed up in the last year, particularly since last summer's East Coast Pro Showcase, when he weighed more than 280 pounds. Vogelbach is limited to first base and may be limited to the American League, but he may hit his way into the firs three rounds. He's committed to Florida.
9 69 Houston Astros Adrian Houser RHP Locust Grove (Okla.) HS Okla. $530,100
Houser's last high school outing was one of his best. He took a no-hitter into the sixth inning and finished with a 16-strikeout two-hitter in the Oklahoma 4-A quarterfinals, and two days later Locust Grove won its first baseball championship. Also a center fielder, he scored two of Locust Grove's four runs and threw out a runner at the plate in the semifinals, and made a nifty back-to-the-infield catch during the finale. An Oklahoma recruit, Houser has good size (6-foot-3, 200 pounds) and a quick arm capable of delivering 90-92 mph fastballs and topping out at 95. He also shows feel for a hard curveball but has a lot of work to do with his changeup. He uses his height and a high arm slot to throw on a steep downhill angle. Though he's athletic, Houser needs to do a better job of maintaining his delivery and command. His father Mike is the baseball coach at Locust Grove, and one of his cousins (Bob Davis) spent eights seasons in the big leagues as a big league catcher.
10 70 Milwaukee Brewers Jorge Lopez RHP Academia de Milagrosa, Cayey, P.R. P.R. $690,000
Lopez is the best prospect in Puerto Rico and could be the island's highest-drafted pitcher ever. (The current record-holder is Luis Atilano, 35th overall in 2003.) A volleyball player and track participant in the past, Lopez is a fine athlete who has plenty of projection remaining in his 6-foot-4, 180-pound frame. He's lanky, long and loose, with a fastball that sits 89-91 mph and touches 93 regularly. Lopez also stands out for having one of the best breaking balls scouts can recall for a Puerto Rican pitcher. He has flashed an above-average curve, which doesn't have true 12-to-6 rotation but isn't far off. At times it's short and tight, and he has a feel for it that belies his age and inexperience. Lopez's athletic ability has scouts optimistic about his ability to pick up larger improvements such as a changeup as well as nuances like fielding his position. He'll have to get stronger to make good on the projections scouts have for him.
11 71 New York Mets Cory Mazzoni RHP North Carolina State N.C. $437,500
Mazzoni has been the Wolfpack's ace this season, and he leads a pack of righthanders in North Carolina because he has the best chance of remaining a starter at the pro level. Solidly built at 6-foot-1, 195 pounds, he has been durable and holds his velocity deep into games while doing a good job of repeating his delivery. He will typically sit at 90-94 mph with his fastball and can dial it up to 97 when he needs it. He also works with a power breaking ball that isn't always consistent but can be above-average, and a splitter. It's not a conventional package for a starter because he doesn't throw a soft pitch to his glove side. His 3-6, 3.93 record is misleading. In 92 innings, Mazzoni had 105 strikeouts and 27 walks while opponents were hitting .229 against him. Scouts like his competitive nature and think he could be a back-of-the-rotation starter or move quickly as a late-inning reliever. Mazzoni figures to go off the board around the third round.
12 72 Florida Marlins Adam Conley LHP Washington State Wash. $625,000
Conley moved from Washington State's closer role last year to the Friday night starter this year. He has an aggressive, almost Dontrelle Willis-like delivery. His fastball typically sits in the 88-93 mph range, but he can touch 95 and has been as high as 97 when he was used in relief as a sophomore. His two-seam fastball has heavy sink and his changeup has good fade. He throws a slider, but it has a long way to go. It has rolling action instead of sharp snap and he mostly relies on locating his fastball, changing speeds and inducing weak contact. With his peerless work ethic and outstanding makeup, Conley has embraced a leadership role this year. Still, evaluators are split on his future role. Some believe his lack of a breaking ball will limit him to a bullpen role. Supporters say the sink on his fastball, the confidence in his changeup and his strong work ethic will allow him to remain as a starter as his breaking ball develops.
13 73 Los Angeles Dodgers Alex Santana 3B Mariner HS, Cape Coral, Fla. Fla. $499,500
Santana, the son of ex-big leaguer Rafael Santana, has a big body at 6-foot-4, 195 pounds and may outgrow shortstop. He definitely has the hands and footwork to have a chance to handle third base, however, and as a projectable, athletic frame. With more strength, Santana's bat could provide the power to profile at third base. He has solid bat speed but may needs some tweaks to his swing path to project to hit for more power. He's an average runner at best and speed doesn't figure to be part of his game.
14 74 Toronto Blue Jays Daniel Norris LHP Science Hill HS, Johnson City, Tenn. Tenn. $2,000,000
Norris entered 2011 as the top high school lefthander in the country, and he has done nothing to change that assessment. He spent last summer dealing for the East Cobb Yankees and then gave up football, where he played quarterback, to focus on baseball as a senior. Norris has shown three potential plus pitches, with a fastball that reaches 96 mph but generally rests in the 89-93 mph range, a curveball and changeup. He throws the changeup with good arm speed and has plenty of hand speed to spin a breaking ball, and he has also toyed with a slider. Norris features a clean arm and plenty of athleticism, though like many high school pitchers he has inconsistent mechanics, tipping when he's throwing a fastball or breaking ball. He has the athleticism to make adjustments quickly, and he had already improved his arm action in recent months, making it more compact. Scouts laud his makeup and passion for the game. A Clemson recruit, Norris has strong present stuff and room to improve.
15 75 Tampa Bay Rays Granden Goetzman OF Palmetto (Fla.) HS Fla. $490,000
Three factors have helped Goetzman jump up draft boards this spring: the thin Florida high school class, a lack of high school power bats and his own sizable talent. Minor shoulder issues kept him off the main showcase circuit, though he was a known commodity among Florida area scouts, so he has really introduced himself to national-level scouts this spring. Primarily a shortstop and pitcher in high school, Goetzman will move to an outfield corner as a pro, and he's gotten comparisons to such players as Jayson Werth and Jay Buhner. Bat speed and leverage help him produce prodigious power, and like Werth, Goetzman is a tall, angular athlete who might even have a shot at playing some center field. He's far from a stiff righthanded hitter, with a loose swing and above-average speed, especially under way. His hit tool is also advanced, as he has good natural timing. Scouts laud his makeup, and if a team thinks he can stay in the infield or play center, he could push his way into the first round.
16 76 Detroit Tigers James McCann C Arkansas Ark. $577,900
McCann is a California product who was drafted in the 31st round out of high school and has started for most of the last three seasons at Arkansas. He is putting together his best college season as a consistent hitter for a relatively punchless Arkansas club, rebounding from a .105 showing in the Cape Cod League last summer. McCann doesn't have any standout tools, but he also doesn't have a glaring weakness. He has a chance to hit for average and has fringe-average power, though his swing can get long. His home runs usually come on mistakes, and he has had issues with velocity. McCann has a solid-average arm and is a fringe-average receiver whose actions can get long defensively as well. His solid 6-foot-2, 210-pound frame is a plus, as are his leadership skills and intangibles. The thin college catcher crop should help him get drafted in the first three rounds.
17 77 Colorado Rockies Carl Thomore OF East Brunswick (N.J.) HS N.J. $480,000
Thomore has battled adversity to become a premium prospect in this year's draft. His mother died with breast cancer in 2005, and then he sustained a gruesome injury in a showcase in suburban Atlanta last summer. Thomore's cleat got caught in the dirt as he slid into third base, dislocating and breaking his ankle. An orthopedic surgeon who was in the stands came onto the field to help. He offered the choice of going to the hospital for treatment--risking complications because Thomore's circulation had been restricted--or popping the bone back into place on the field. Thomore gritted his teeth and chose the latter, and some say the decision and the doctor (who has never been identified) saved his baseball career. Scouts love Thomore's grinder mentality, and he grows on people the more they seem him. His only standout tool is his power, which is above-average. A plus runner before the injury, Thomore is now average, but he's aggressive with good instincts and is better under way. He profiles as a corner outfielder with an average arm. He's a physical 6-foot-1, 195 pounds and projects as an average hitter who can go to all fields.
18 78 Toronto Blue Jays Jeremy Gabryszwski RHP Crosby (Texas) HS Texas $575,000
Jeremy Gabryszwski excited scouts when he touched 94 mph with his fastball in his first scrimmage. He sat at 92-93 for three innings, and also showed a plus slider and an average changeup. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound righthander didn't maintain that stuff throughout the season, often working in the high 80s. He had surgery to repair a displaced bone in his elbow in 2008, with doctors placing a screw in his elbow. He's a Lamar recruit.
19 79 St. Louis Cardinals Charlie Tilson OF New Trier HS, Winnetka, Ill. Ill. $1,275,000
Though Tilson was the best player on New Trier's 2009 Illinois 4-A championship team as a sophomore, he didn't burst onto the prospect scene until the Area Code Games the following summer. Tilson led all players with seven stolen bases in three games, hit the wood-bat event's lone home run and finished fourth in the SPARQ athletic testing. He hasn't quite shown the same tools this spring, however, and fits more in the second or third round. The Area Code homer was an aberration, as the 6-foot, 175-pounder has average bat speed and a line-drive swing. Power isn't his game, as he's a lefty hitter who fits at the top of the lineup. His game is to make contact and get on base. His speed rates a 65 on the 20-80 scouting scale, and he'll be more dangerous once he improves his jumps. He runs down balls in center field and shows a slightly above-average arm. His instincts and makeup help enhance his tools. Area scouts who have more history with Tilson don't rate him as highly as scouting directors and crosscheckers who saw him at the Area Code Games. An Illinois recruit, he draws comparisons to former Illini speedster Kyle Hudson, a standout athlete who was a fourth-round pick of the Orioles in 2008. Hudson is quicker, but Tilson is a better hitter and has more polish at the same stage of their careers. He's a top student and could be a tough sign.
20 80 Chicago White Sox Erik Johnson RHP California Calif. $450,000
Johnson has a big, 6-foot-2, 240-pound frame and sometimes has trouble maintaining his mechanics. His delivery can get a little rigid and he loses his arm slot at times, though he's been better about getting it back than he was last year. Johnson is quick to the plate and sits in the 90-94 mph range with his fastball and tops out at 95. His best secondary offering is a hard slider that he can throw for strikes or use as a wipeout pitch and he also mixes in a slow, show-me curveball and a changeup that is inconsistent, but shows flashes of being a quality pitch. Johnson sometimes tries to be too fine with his fastball instead of trusting that he can overpower hitters with it. While he needs to sharpen his fastball command, Johnson has shown a good enough feel for pitching to get by and go deep into games without it.
21 81 Boston Red Sox Williams Jerez OF Grand Street HS, Brooklyn N.Y. $443,700
Jerez moved from the Dominican Republic with his father two years ago. He originally drew interest as a lefthander, but he has more potential as a center fielder and has generated a lot of buzz this spring after playing in Florida for Hank's Yanks, a team sponsored by Yankees owner Hank Steinbrenner. Jerez's 6-foot-4, 190-pound frame is what one scout described as "about as good a body as you could imagine." He has a wiry strong build and should add bulk as he matures. He has average raw power, with loft and leverage in his swing, which has a tendency to get long. Some scouts worry how he will fare against premium velocity, but his bat speed has improved even since March. Jerez has a plus arm and plus speed, but it doesn't play down the line because he's slow out of the batter's box. There's no consensus on Jerez: Some scouts question his background and age and don't like his bat, while others project on his raw tools and athleticism.
22 82 San Diego Padres Austin Hedges C JSerra HS, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. Calif. $3,000,000
Scouts in Southern California rave that Hedges is the best defensive backstop to come out of the area in at least a decade. He has spent six years honing his defense with highly regarded JSerra coach Brett Kay, a former catcher at Cal State Fullerton and in the Mets system. Grades on his receiving range from 60 to 70 on the 20-80 scouting scale, while his arm rates as a 70 or even an 80, producing pop times as low as 1.78 seconds. Wiry, athletic and agile, Hedges is an exceptional blocker, adept at keeping balls in front of him. He's a below-average runner but not a baseclogger. Hedges is a high-energy player with an aggressive approach at the plate, and some scouts think he has a chance to be an average hitter with average power, though others think that is too ambitious. A righthanded hitter, most of his power is to the pull side, but he has worked hard on using the opposite field. He's a good competitor with an outstanding work ethic, and he projects as an everyday catcher with all-star potential, though he'll be tough to sign away from his commitment to UCLA.
23 83 Texas Rangers Will Lamb LHP Clemson S.C. $430,200
Will Lamb will be a tough call, as he has a pro body that scouts are eager to see in pro ball. He's tall and lean at 6-foot-6, 175 pounds, and has good athletic ability. He's the center fielder for the Tigers and had a better offensive season in 2011 (hitting .344 though with limited power) than in 2010 (.289, four homers), despite this year's lesser bats. Lamb's a fine defender as well and is an above-average runner (he hadn't hit into a double play all year), and scouts who believe in his power could send him out as a center or right fielder. He has told scouts he prefers to hit. More likely, he'll go out as a pitcher, where he has flashed two plus pitches. In shorter stints, Lamb uses his long levers and athleticism to flash 94-95 mph fastballs and a slider with bite and power. As a starter, though, he sits average or fringe-average with his velocity and babies his slider. His arm works and his delivery is sound, leaving scouts to believe Lamb could take off if he concentrates on pitching. Questions about his competitiveness and consistency make him more of an unknown than many of his peers. He could go out as soon as the fourth round.
24 84 Cincinnati Reds Gabriel Rosa OF Colegio Hector Urdaneta, Rio Grande, P.R. P.R. $500,000
The top position player in Puerto Rico in 2011, Rosa has committed to Bethune-Cookman. Scouts didn't expect him to reach college, though, as he has enough present tools to go out in the first four rounds. Two scouts compared him to former big league outfielder Juan Encarnacion for his rangy frame and solid all-around tools. He has a loose body with projection and should fill out his 6-foot-4, 180-pound frame. Some scouts believe he'll have to move to a corner, while others believe the current shortstop can stay in center field. He has solid raw power and is a plus runner, though he's no burner. Rosa has bad timing habits that tend to cause him to lead with his shoulder and open up too early in his swing in an attempt to pull the ball. His swing path has some inconsistencies as well, and he doesn't keep his bat in the hitting zone long enough. Rosa's arm plays average.
25 85 Atlanta Braves Nick Ahmed SS Connecticut Conn. $417,600
With the spotlight on UConn teammates George Springer and Matt Barnes this spring, Ahmed made the most of his opportunities. The more scouts saw of him, the more they liked him, especially his old-school approach to the game. Ahmed got bigger and stronger before this season, adding muscle to his 6-foot-2, 205-pound frame. He's a good athlete, a plus runner and has a plus arm. There's nothing fluid about his actions at shortstop, but he has average range and makes every play. There are questions about how his bat will play at the next level, and he struggled with Bourne in the Cape Cod League last summer, but he has improved his bat control and the way his hands work to the ball. Ahmed also showed a 91-94 mph fastball in the Big East Conference tournament as a reliever last year. He suffered a collapsed lung in a collision at first base in late April, but the injury isn't a long-term concern. If anything, scouts were impressed with his fiery energy in that midweek game against Quinnipiac.
26 86 San Francisco Giants Andrew Susac C Oregon State Ore. $1,100,000
Susac gets mixed reviews from scouts in the Northwest this spring, but scouting directors saw him at his best last summer and catching is at even more of a premium than usual this year, so he could still be a first-rounder. He broke the hamate bone in his left wrist midway through the season but was back in game action a month later, even getting back behind the plate. During the layoff, Susac still threw regularly and did drills to improve his footwork behind the plate. He has above-average arm strength and can shut down a running game. He needs to improve his receiving skills, as his hands can get a little stiff, but he's a good athlete who blocks well. Susac has a good approach at the plate, which Beavers coaches attribute to him seeing quality stuff from their pitchers day in and day out. He has more power than a pure feel for hitting. He uses a high leg kick as part of his load, which can disrupt his timing and rhythm at times, but when he's in sync he shows above-average pop, mostly to his pull side. His success on the Cape carried over to this season and helped his confidence behind the plate.
27 87 Minnesota Twins Madison Boer RHP Oregon Ore. $405,000
Boer has the type of frame scouts look for in starting pitchers. He's big and strong at 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds and he's a good athlete that ran a 6.7-second 60-yard dash for scouts in the fall. The athleticism helps give Boer a clean and efficient delivery and helps him maintain stamina throughout game. His fastball sits in the 90-93 mph range, but there could be more in there--he's touched 96 before in relief stints and moved back to the bullpen late this spring as he tired out. Boer has a good slider, but it's the splitter he added to this year that has helped the most. He throws the pitch with two different grips. If he needs to throw it for a strike, he'll keep the ball closer to his fingertips, throwing it like a changeup. But he can also put the ball deeper into his hand to get more depth on the pitch if he's trying to get a hitter to chase.
28 88 New York Yankees Sam Stafford LHP Texas Texas
Lefthander Sam Stafford hasn't been able to nail down a spot in Texas' weekend rotation, though not because he lacks stuff. The 6-foot-4, 190-pounder hit 96 mph while winning pitcher-of-the-year honors in the California Collegiate League last summer, but he has to dial his fastball down to 90-91 mph to try to find the strike zone. He has good shape to his curveball and doesn't always locate that pitch where he wants, either. Stafford can be unhittable at times. If he can't improve his command he'll be ticketed for the bullpen as a pro.
29 89 Tampa Bay Rays Lenny Linsky RHP Hawaii Hawaii $392,400
Linsky was a decent prospect coming out of high school--though he wasn't drafted--but he has blossomed at Hawaii. He has improved each year and was nearly unhittable this spring, helping the Rainbows finish first in the Western Athletic Conference for the first time since 1992. His fastball has incredible sink, even at 92-94 mph, and he can run it up to 96 from a low three-quarters arm slot. Hitters frequently swing over his fastball, and he has a dominating slider that can get as high as 89 mph. One scout joked that hitters need a shovel if they want to elevate the ball against Linsky. He allowed just three extra-base hits during the regular season--all doubles. Earlier in the season, he was flying open and getting under his pitches, but a few mechanical adjustments fixed that problem and he was better the second half. Linsky has a durable frame at 6-foot-2 and 215 pounds and a closer's mentality. He could go as high as the sandwich round and should move quickly through the minor leagues.
30 90 Philadelphia Phillies Harold Martinez 3B Miami Fla. $387,000
Miami's top prospect entering the year was supposed to be third baseman Harold Martinez, who also was highly touted entering his senior year in high school. He has a long performance track record that included two USA Baseball stints. He had a modest senior high school season and wound up at Miami, and he seems to be following a similar path this year. He hit 21 homers as a sophomore to lead the Atlantic Coast Conference. The less-potent bats at the college level this season have affected Martinez, though, and he had as many sacrifice hits (10) as extra-base hits through 53 games. He has timing issues at the plate and doesn't recognize pitches well, and he has yet to hit .300 at the college level. He has raw power but doesn't make consistent enough contact to bring it out. Martinez is a solid athlete who can handle third base defensively, with plenty of arm strength. He has filled in at shortstop when needed and has played some first base. He runs well enough to handle a corner outfield spot. His best-case scenario as a pro could be as a utility player thanks to his glove.