Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 34 Washington Nationals Brian Goodwin OF Miami Dade JC Fla. $3,000,000
Goodwin has been under the microscope this year and has responded well. He was a 16th-round pick out of Rocky Mount (N.C.) High in 2009 but didn't sign and went to North Carolina, where he posted a solid .291/.409/.511 freshman season. Goodwin then went to the Cape Cod League and ranked as the No. 6 prospect after hitting .281/.364/.360. Then he was suspended for a violation of university policy at North Carolina, so he transferred to Miami-Dade JC. He got off to a slow start thanks in part to a tweaked hamstring, but Goodwin came on to earn comparisons to ex-big leaguer Jacque Jones. Goodwin has average to plus tools across the board, starting with his hitting ability. He's patient, draws walks and has present strength, and some project him to have future plus power. A plus runner who's not quite a burner, Goodwin has the tools for center field, but he played a corner spot at North Carolina and doesn't consistently display natural instincts in center.
2 35 Toronto Blue Jays Jake Anderson OF Chino (Calif.) HS Calif. $990,000
Anderson's stock soared after he won the home run derby at the Under Armour All-America Game at Wrigley Field last August, nearly putting a ball on Waveland Avenue in the final round. Scouts were frustrated they could not see Anderson play the outfield this spring, because Chino High had no other viable options at first base and used Anderson there. Tall and projectable at 6-foot-4, 195 pounds, he is a long strider with solid-average speed under way, and he profiles either in center or right, where he should have adequate arm strength. Anderson is a physical specimen with plenty of leverage and solid-average to plus raw power potential in his slightly uphill swing. Scouts are not convinced his bat is ready for pro ball, as he struggles to recognize offspeed stuff and needs to learn how to make adjustments. But he has the ability to become an average hitter down the road. A top-five-rounds talent, Anderson is likely headed to school at Pepperdine, where he'll help anchor a strong recruiting class.
3 36 Boston Red Sox Henry Owens LHP Edison HS, Huntington Beach, Calif. Calif. $1,550,000
The top high school pitching prospect in Southern California by a landslide, Owens has a long track record of success against top competition in the biggest showcases and high school games. His 6-foot-7, 200-pound frame, easy arm action, deception, composure and advanced feel for pitching make him a potential late first-round or sandwich pick this June. Scouts have been waiting for his velocity to jump up from the 87-90 mph range for two years, and this spring it has bumped 94, though he still pitches at 88-91. He entered the spring with a loopy curveball as his second pitch, but his offspeed stuff has improved as the season progressed. His curveball has firmed up a bit, and midway through the spring he started throwing a slider and a low-80s cutter, demonstrating better feel for his craft. He also has a promising changeup, though he seldom uses it against overmatched high school hitters. Despite his size and arm action, scouts aren't convinced Owens has a ton of projection, and his lack of current plus stuff creates reservations.
4 37 Texas Rangers Zach Cone OF Georgia Ga. $873,000
Cone looks like a big leaguer but hasn't played like one this season. After hitting .363 as a sophomore, he was batting .283/.343/.382 as a junior, and scouts were saying more than just the new bats were at play. He appears to lack trust in his hitting ability, swinging early in counts and getting out on his front foot too often. Scouts question his pitch recognition, and he has drawn just 33 walks in three seasons. Cone's other tools range from good to outstanding. He's a plus runner with above-average range in center field. He has understandably played with less abandon after an early-season collision in the outfield that left teammate Jonathan Taylor in the hospital and partially paralyzed with a neck injury. He gets good enough jumps and reads in center field to profile as an above-average defender there. His arm has gone backward, playing fringe-average this spring after it was plus in the fall. Cone has solid raw power and strength, and ranks as one of the college ranks' best athletes, with physical ability comparable to fellow college outfielders such as Mikie Mahtook and George Springer. Even area scouts who see all his flaws expect Cone, who was a third-round pick out of high school in 2008, to improve on that by a round or so in 2011.
5 38 Tampa Bay Rays Brandon Martin SS Santiago HS, Corona, Calif. Calif. $860,000
Perhaps the most improved prep player in Southern California, Martin has rocketed to the top of the region's thin group of high school infielders by showing off five legitimate tools this spring. He worked hard to add muscle in the offseason, and it paid dividends at the plate. Scouts used to question his bat, but now they praise his line-drive swing and bat speed. Some scouts think he'll develop at least average power, while others regard his power as fringy. He's a good high-ball hitter with an aggressive approach, and he could mature into a solid-average hitter. An average runner, Martin is a fast-twitch athlete who can make highlight-reel plays at shortstop, though he has plenty of work to do there. He has good range and a strong arm with good carry, but he's also an upright defender who tends to field balls deep and needs to smooth out his actions. He has a quiet personality but is a good teammate and a hard worker.
6 39 Philadelphia Phillies Larry Greene OF Berrien County HS, Nashville, Ga. Ga. $1,000,000
Greene isn't quite one-dimensional, but it's close. He's a physical beast at 6-foot-2, 235 pounds, and one evaluator compared his power to that of Russell Branyan, another south Georgia lefthanded hitter. Green was dominating and putting on huge power displays against modest pitching, pushing himself into first-round consideration. However, scouts who saw him last summer recall he struggled mightily with velocity at the East Coast Pro Showcase. Greene is somewhat stiff but is an average runner, which should give him a chance to play left field, but some scouts think he'll wind up as more of a first base/DH type. Greene's value is mostly in his bat and well above-average raw power. He's likely to put on a display in individual workouts for teams prior to the draft.
7 40 Boston Red Sox Jackie Bradley OF South Carolina S.C. $1,100,000
Bradley was South Carolina's best player his first two seasons, bashing 24 home runs, walking more than he struck out and overcoming an early hamate injury to lead the Gamecocks to the 2010 national championship. He was the Most Outstanding Player of the College World Series and then played for USA Baseball's college national team. Scouting directors saw him hit .318 and saw a premium defender in center field, with average speed but tremendous instincts, good routes and a plus arm. However, Bradley was struggling with the new BBCOR bats and slumping this season before he went down with a left wrist injury. He had surgery at the start of May to repair ligament and tendon damage and wasn't expected to return this season. Supporters point to his track record because his lone plus tools are his defense and his arm. He lost his feel for hitting this spring as he sold out for power, employing an uppercut that helped drop his average to .259. His believers give him above-average hitting grades for his bat speed and approach. Bradley looked to be sliding, perhaps out of the first round.
8 41 Tampa Bay Rays Tyler Goeddel 3B St. Francis HS, Mountain View, Calif. Calif. $1,500,000
Goeddel's father, David, is a pioneer in the biotechnology industry and helped develop synthetic insulin and human growth hormone. His brother, Erik, is a pitcher in the Mets organization, drafted out of UCLA last year. Tyler has a gangly and projectable 6-foot-4, 170-pound frame. He's also a well above-average runner, athletic enough to play third base, though his speed may be best utilized in center field. Goeddel has above-average arm strength and shows intriguing tools at the plate. He takes aggressive swings with bat speed, and his bat head stays in the hitting zone for a long time. Scouts have to project on Goeddel's power, but it's not hard to envision him hitting for at least average power as he adds muscle to his frame. Goeddel missed time this season with mononucleosis, but he still has the track record and skill set to be a premium pick.
9 42 Tampa Bay Rays Jeff Ames RHP Lower Columbia (Wash.) JC Wash. $650,000
Ames has already been drafted twice: by the Phillies (46th round) in 2009 out of high school in Vancouver, Wash., and last year by the Rockies (30th round) out of Lower Columbia. His stuff has gradually improved each year, and he took things up a notch last summer, sitting 92-95 mph and touching 97 in the West Coast League, ranking as the league's No. 3 prospect. His stuff has held up this spring, as his fastball has been consistently in the mid-90s. His fastball has nasty, riding life and arm-side run. His breaking ball doesn't always show the tight break scouts like to see, his changeup is just all right, and he does pitch with some effort, but he should go high enough this year to keep him away from his commitment to Oregon.
10 43 Arizona Diamondbacks Andrew Chafin LHP Kent State Ohio $875,000
After missing all of 2010 recovering from Tommy John surgery, Chafin has bounced back so well that he should become the fourth Kent State pitcher (following Dustin Hermanson, Travis Miller and John Van Benschoten) selected in the first or sandwich round. Chafin dominated as a reliever in 2009 and has done the same as a starter this spring, going 6-1, 2.14 with 91 strikeouts in 71 innings through mid-May. His 81-83 mph slider can be unhittable and earns some 70 grades on the 20-80 scouting scale, and he commands a 90-95 mph fastball to both sides of the plate. When he was unable to throw a breaking ball during his rehab, he worked on a changeup, which now shows signs of becoming an average pitch. The 6-foot-2, 210-pounder repeats his delivery well and throws strikes. Chafin's only setback this spring came when he developed a tired arm after making nine consecutive starts, but his stuff looked crisp again when he took a week off and returned in a relief role. He has the stuff and makeup to become a No. 2 starter or a closer.
11 44 New York Mets Michael Fulmer RHP Deer Creek HS, Edmond, Okla. Okla. $937,500
Oklahoma has its best high school pitching crop ever, highlighted by Dylan Bundy and Archie Bradley and featuring three other arms who could go in the first five rounds. Fulmer is the best of the second tier and has improved his stock to the point where he could be a top-50 selection. After pitching at 87-91 mph on the showcase circuit last summer, he has boosted his fastball to the mid-90s and topped out at 97 mph this spring. He maintains his velocity, often showing some 93s and 94s in the late innings. His slider also has gotten harder, improving from 78-80 mph to 83-85. Like many high school pitchers, he'll need to refine a changeup. His arm works well, though he could firm up his 6-foot-2, 200-pound frame.
12 45 Colorado Rockies Trevor Story SS Irving (Texas) HS Texas $915,000
Story is one of the few quality, surefire shortstops in the 2011 draft, with a better chance to stick at the position than Javier Baez and Levi Michael. Scouts who believe in Story's bat see him as close to a five-tool shortstop, so he could sneak into the end of the first round. He has smooth actions along with plus range and arm strength. He has shown a 90-92 mph fastball while occasionally closing games for Irving. Story has good pop for a middle infielder, though the 6-foot, 175-pounder generates his power by collapsing on his backside and using an uppercut. His quick hands generate plenty of bat speed and allow him to barrel balls, though he may need to tone down his swing against professional pitchers. He has above-average speed and runs the bases well. Though he has committed to Louisiana State, he's expected to turn pro if he gets selected before the start of the second round.
13 46 Toronto Blue Jays Joe Musgrove RHP Grossmont HS, El Cajon, Calif. Calif. $500,000
Musgrove has improved his stock as much as any prep player in Southern California this spring. He was solid but unspectacular at the Southern California Invitational Showcase at the MLB Urban Youth Academy in February, working in the 88-91 mph range. Since then, his velocity has jumped, and many scouts now regard him as the best high school righthander in the region's thin crop. Musgrove, a San Diego State commit, has a physical 6-foot-5, 225-pound frame and an easy delivery. For most of this spring his fastball has sat comfortably in the 90-92 mph range with heavy sink, and he can reach back for 93-94 when he needs to. At his best, some scouts say they saw him touch 97-98, to go along with a hammer curveball in the 76-82 mph range. Usually, though, he throws a three-quarters slurve in the 77-80 range. Musgrove also mixes in a split-change. A former offensive and defensive lineman for the Grossmont football team, Musgrove is a tenacious competitor. He still has to work on repeating his delivery more consistently and fine-tuning his secondary stuff, but it's easy to dream on him becoming a big league workhorse starter.
14 47 Chicago White Sox Keenyn Walker OF Central Arizona JC Ariz. $795,000
Walker was drafted in the 16th round out of high school in Utah in 2009 and last year at Central Arizona, in the 38th round. Scouts have always been intrigued by the 6-foot-3 switch-hitter with standout tools and impressive athleticism. The raw tools don't always translate on the baseball field, however, and he didn't even start regularly last year. This year is a different story. Walker has performed well with wood and he should get more than the $250,000 he reportedly turned down out of high school. Walker has more power from the right side, but his lefthanded swing is more pure. He's mostly a gap hitter with above-average speed, so he profiles as a good defensive center fielder. He has the speed to hit at the top of the order, but needs to cut down on his strikeouts. If he doesn't sign, Walker will head to Utah.
15 48 San Diego Padres Mike Kelly RHP West Boca Raton (Fla.) HS Fla. $718,000
Kelly powered West Boca to Florida's state 5-A title with his bat and his arm, throwing an 86-pitch six-hit shutout in the state semifinal in his final appearance. Scouts want him as a pitcher, and his frame is as ideal as any pitcher in the country. He's a fairly fluid athlete who is growing into his 6-foot-5, 210-pound body. Kelly entered the year with great expectations and didn't live up to them early, struggling mechanically to stay tall in his delivery and with inconsistent velocity. His body and stuff elicit comparisons to A.J. Cole, who entered 2010 as the top arm in Florida's prep ranks and wound up a fourth-rounder while still signing for $2 million. Kelly's fastball is a shade below Cole's, topping out at 94 and regularly sitting in the 89-92 mph range. He also throws a curveball and changeup that project to be average pitches but are fringe-average at present. His curve flashes the depth to be a plus pitch if he can firm up his delivery and get better extension out front. Kelly, like Cole, doesn't always attack hitters aggressively like scouts want him to, but he has gotten better as the season progressed.
16 49 San Francisco Giants Kyle Crick RHP Sherman (Texas) HS Texas $900,000
Crick played mostly first base for Sherman as a junior a year ago, but began to realize his future was on the mound when he hit 94 mph with his fastball on the showcase circuit during the summer. He since has emerged as the top pitching prospect in the Texas high school ranks this spring. Working from a high three-quarters arm slot, he consistently has dealt in the low 90s, peaking at 97 mph and featuring late life on his heater. His mid-70s curveball is a plus pitch at times, though it lacks command and consistency because he overthrows it. Crick also will flash an above-average slider and fiddles around with a splitter and a changeup, but he's essentially still in the early stages of learning to pitch. He's mainly an arm-strength guy right now, but it's impressive arm strength. There's effort in the 6-foot-3, 225-pounder's delivery, and he'd do a better job of living in the strike zone if he took a more direct line toward the plate. He has committed to Texas Christian.
17 50 Minnesota Twins Travis Harrison 3B Tustin (Calif.) HS Calif. $1,050,000
Harrison established himself as one of the top power hitters in Southern California early, homering off future Rockies first-rounder Tyler Matzek with a wood bat as a freshman in scout ball. He easily rates as the region's best high school bat this year. Harrison has a physical 6-foot-2, 215-pound frame and above-average righthanded power potential. Some scouts think he could be an above-average hitter, too, if he does a better job protecting the outer half and adjusting to breaking balls. He can make loud contact, but he centers balls on the barrel inconsistently, and other scouts see him as just an average hitter. It's unclear where he'll play on the diamond. His arm has improved to the point that some scouts now consider it average, but his actions at third base are stiff and his range and footwork are fringy. He'll get a chance to stay at the hot corner, however, before falling back to first. He's a below-average runner with solid instincts on the basepaths. Harrison plays hard and loves to compete, and scouts expect a club to buy him out of his commitment to Southern California.
18 51 New York Yankees Dante Bichette Jr. OF Orangewood Christian HS, Orlando Fla. $750,000
Bichette's father played 14 seasons in the major leagues, earning four All-Star Game nods, collecting 1,906 hits and 274 home runs and even posting a 30-30 season in 1996. His son is cut from similar cloth. He's a righthanded hitter who has solid athleticism and a track record of performance, going back to helping his Little League team reach Williamsport, Pa. The younger Bichette is a high school infielder, but his profile will wind up being that of a power-hitting left fielder. He lacks fluidity defensively, and his best tool when he's not in the batter's box is his throwing arm. Offense is his calling card, and he's a cage rat who often can be found taking extra rounds of batting practice. Bichette has had a lot of movement in his swing but has toned down a bit this season while still producing big power and plenty of bat speed. He has as much raw power as any prep player in Florida and runs well enough to be a corner outfielder if he can't stay in the infield. He's committed to Georgia.
19 52 Tampa Bay Rays Blake Snell LHP Shorewood HS, Shoreline, Wash. Wash. $684,000
Snell is a long and lean 6-foot-4 and 190 pounds, but he has narrow, sloping shoulders and may always be skinny, and scouts don't see anywhere to put a lot of added weight on his frame. His fastball sits between 88-92 mph, and he has touched 94 this season. While that grades out as an average fastball, scouts question whether he'll be able to maintain that velocity over a full minor league season because of his frame. His curveball and changeup are just average at best. Snell has performed well this season and wasn't fazed when there were 40-50 scouts behind the backstop. Snell was home schooled until this year and was committed to Washington's banner class, but he has not yet qualified academically, which may make him more signable. Because of his signability, his velocity and how well he has performed in front of crosscheckers, Snell could get popped as high as the supplemental first round, though on pure talent he would probably go a few rounds later.
20 53 Toronto Blue Jays Dwight Smith Jr. OF McIntosh (Ga.) HS Ga. $800,000
Smith is the son of the big league outfielder of the same name. Junior has tools and a game that resemble his father significantly. His best tool is his bat, as he owns a pure stroke that ranks among the best in the draft class. He features a prominent leg kick at the plate, yet always seems to be on time and gets his bat into the hitting zone for a long time. Smith has a bit less speed than his dad and may wind up a below-average runner when it's all said and done, pushing him from center field to a corner. He has enough arm strength to make right field a possibility, but a move to a corner will put more pressure on his bat. He has solid power and projects to have average raw power. He's committed to Georgia Tech.
21 54 San Diego Padres Brett Austin C Providence HS, Charlotte N.C.
Scouts in the Carolinas consider Austin the most improved player in the area this spring after seeing him on the showcase circuit last summer. He gained favor in May as crosscheckers and scouting directors came in to watch his team wrap up a conference title against rival Ardrey Kell High, a nationally ranked team at the time. Austin tied the game in the seventh inning with a missile home run, leaving scouts impressed with his sweet lefthanded swing. At 6-foot-1, 190 pounds, he has improved his top-hand strength from the left side and is more fluid than in the past. A switch-hitter, Austin is a natural righty and has more strength from that side, but his swing can get long at times. In addition to his swing, Austin has improved his body, though questions remain about his defense. He's not athletic, and his arm strength is average at best, but some scouts believe he could be an average defender. Couple that with his ability to hit to all fields and Austin could find himself off the board in the second round. He is part of an impressive North Carolina State recruiting class.
22 55 Minnesota Twins Hudson Boyd RHP Bishop Verot HS, Fort Myers, Fla. Fla. $1,000,000
Boyd transferred from South Fort Myers High to Bishop Verot as he teamed with similarly beefy first baseman Dan Vogelbach. Together, they led their team to a state 3-A championship with Boyd 10-0 with 112 strikeouts through early May. His delivery and 6-foot-3, 235-pound frame have elicited comparisons to Jonathan Broxton and Bartolo Colon, and scouts intend those as positives. Boyd projects as a mid-rotation workhorse who will work with two plus pitches. He maintains the velocity on his fastball deep into games, topping out at 95-96 mph and sitting in the 90-94 range. His breaking ball also is plus, a power curve that scrapes 80 mph with tight rotation and sharp break. Boyd's changeup can be too firm at times, but he hasn't needed it much in high school.
23 56 Tampa Bay Rays Kes Carter OF Western Kentucky Ky. $625,000
Western Kentucky is one of the better mid-major programs in college baseball, having won 77 games and produced 11 draft picks in the previous two seasons. The Hilltoppers should have another half-dozen players selected in 2011, led by Carter, who could become the highest-drafted player in school history. An athletic 6-foot-2, 205-pounder, Carter flashes all five tools. His smooth lefthanded stroke and disciplined approach allow him to hit for average, and he has at least average power potential. He still needs to fine-tune his timing at the plate and turn on balls more frequently. He has slightly above-average speed that plays up on the bases and in center field, as well as a solid arm for the position. The biggest issues with Carter are his struggles against lefthanded pitching and his health. He injured his hip in the Coastal Plain League last summer, sat out during fall practice and missed time this spring with a calf strain. Nevertheless, he shouldn't last past the second round
24 57 Toronto Blue Jays Kevin Comer RHP Seneca HS, Tabernacle, N.J. N.J. $1,650,000
At 6-foot-4, 210 pounds, Comer passes the eye test, and at his best he flashes stuff that would make him a lock for the top three rounds. Scouts haven't been able to get a good read on him this season, as he had thrown just 14 innings and had been inconsistent. Out of the gates, Comer sat in the low 90s and made it look easy. At his best, he also has a 12-to-6 curveball that falls off the table and has shown feel for a changeup. But he missed about 10 days in the middle of the season because of a class trip, and then left a game early and was showing mid-80s velocity. Scouts aren't sure if he is injured or just isn't interested in signing. He is committed to Vanderbilt, and most agree he could be a first-rounder after three years there.
25 58 San Diego Padres Jace Peterson SS McNeese State La. $624,600
Peterson is one of the top two-sport athletes in the draft. A 6-foot-1, 200 pounder, he's a cornerback for McNeese State's football team and had an interception during the 2009 season. He has been more of a factor as the Cowboys' shortstop, leading the Southland Conference in runs in 2010 as an all-conference choice and ranking among the nation's leaders again in 2011. Peterson's profile and athleticism should push him into the first three rounds, as he's a physical, speedy lefthanded hitter with present strength, well above-average speed and a polished approach for a two-sport athlete. He has rough edges to polish in his fielding actions and swing, yet he has more walks than strikeouts as a collegian and has a flat, short, low-maintenance swing. He has the arm strength for shortstop and room to improve there if he can learn to get more extension out front, which would give his throws more carry. Scouts are more comfortable slotting him at second base, and some see him as a utility type. He makes plenty of contact, sacrificing power and limiting his impact potential a bit offensively.
26 59 Tampa Bay Rays Grayson Garvin LHP Vanderbilt Tenn. $370,000
Garvin has performed as well as any Division I pitcher over the last calendar year. He was the Cape Cod League's ERA champion last summer at 5-0, 0.74 with 37 strikeouts in 37 innings. In the spring, he was 11-1, 2.08 and was a perfect 9-0 in Southeastern Conference play until his last start of the regular season. He was named SEC pitcher of the year. Garvin's performance stems from his size, solid stuff and ability to pitch off his fastball. At 6-foot-6, 220 pounds, he gets a good angle on his fastball, pitching downhill, coming inside effectively at 90-92 mph and reaching 94-95 on occasion. His fastball velocity should be a tick above-average as a pro, and he uses his fastball well to set up his solid-average changeup, which has solid fade when he turns it over. His slurvy slider is below-average and rarely generates swings and misses, which limits his upside for many scouts, and he may wind up throwing more of a cutter eventually. Garvin is considered a safe pick, and his summer performance could push him into the first or supplemental first round despite his short breaking ball.
27 60 Tampa Bay Rays James Harris OF Oakland Technical HS Calif. $490,000
Outfielder James Harris looks great in a uniform with his 6-foot-1, 175-pound athletic frame. He's raw and may need two years in Rookie ball, but he has huge upside. Harris is an explosive athlete. He is a well above-average runner, with a 37-inch vertical leap, and can fly on the bases and in center field. He has below-average arm strength, but enough for center field. A righthanded hitter, Harris is patient at the plate, trying to get on base any way possible, and some scouts wonder if he's actually too passive. He also shows some raw power. Harris has not committed to a college, so he should be signable.