Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1s 48 Detroit Tigers Chance Ruffin RHP Texas $1,150,000
En route to a 12-year big league career, Ruffin's father Bruce was a second-round draft pick out of Texas in 1985. His son could match or exceed that draft status after moving full-time to the bullpen this spring. Ruffin's stuff has played up after the change in roles, with his fastball jumping from 89-91 mph to 90-93, topping out at 95 when he's fresh. His 78-82 mph slider is his best pitch, and he has a late-breaking curveball that he uses to get backdoor strikes against lefthanders. He'll also mix in a changeup, though it's really more of a batting-practice fastball. His regular-season numbers--0.77 ERA (the best in NCAA Division I), 13 saves, .176 opponent average, 89-18 K-BB ratio--were as dazzling as any in college baseball. He's similar to former Longhorns closer Huston Street in terms of size, arsenal and competitive makeup. The biggest drawback with Ruffin is his size (6-foot-1, 185 pounds), but nevertheless some scouts think he could make it in pro ball as a starter. More likely, he'll be fast-tracked as a reliever.
2 57 Boston Red Sox Brandon Workman RHP Texas $800,000
The Longhorns have one of the best college pitching staffs in recent memory, as evidenced by their team 2.14 ERA in mid-May--and the fact that Workman, their No. 3 starter, could be a first-round pick. The Phillies drafted him in the third round out of high school, but held firm with a $275,000 offer and wouldn't give him the $350,000 he sought. Now he could get four to five times that amount. Unable to secure a spot in the Longhorns rotation as a sophomore, Workman has been more focused and efficient this spring. His best pitch is a knockout curveball, and he pairs it with a 90-92 mph fastball that peaks at 96. He has developed a high-80s cutter as a strikeout pitch against lefthanders, and he also has some feel for a changeup. His command is better than ever, and he now realizes that he's more effective when he doesn't overthrow, which causes his pitches to flatten out. Workman earned all-star honors in the Cape Cod League the last two summers, leading the league in strikeouts after his freshman season.
3 108 Philadelphia Phillies Cameron Rupp C Texas $287,000
Teams covet catchers with power and arm strength, which put Rupp in position to be a possible first-round pick. But he hasn't had the numbers to put him there, batting .313/.401/.498 though conference tournament play. Scouts have admired his strength since he won the home run derby at the 2006 Aflac Classic, though they aren't sure he'll be able to tap into his power as a pro. He has an arm bar in his righthanded swing that allows pitchers to tie him up inside with good velocity, and he chases too many offspeed pitches and offerings up in the strike zone. Rupp has worked hard to improve his defense and keep his 6-foot-2, 235-pound frame under control, but scouts still worry that his size and lack of athleticism will affect his long-term ability to remain behind the plate. He has plus arm strength and has shortened what once was a long release, and while it's still not compact, he has thrown out 40 percent of basestealers this year. He has gotten better as a receiver and calls most of the pitches for college baseball's most talented pitching staff. He's similar to Ryan Garko, who was a third-round pick out of Stanford, with more power and defensive ability than Garko had.
4 133 Detroit Tigers Cole Green RHP Texas
Green can't match the stuff of the other members of Texas' weekend rotation (projected first-round picks Taylor Jungmann and Brandon Workman), but he has been just as effective, going 10-1, 2.64 with a 66-23 K-BB ratio and .213 opponent average in 99 innings entering regional play. He doesn't have a classic pro build at 6 feet and 210 pounds, and he can't overpower hitters, but he pitches so well and competes so hard that he should go in the first five rounds. Green sits at 89-91 mph and peaks at 93 mph with his sinker, living in the bottom of the strike zone and generating plenty of groundouts. His changeup is a quality offering, and he also has a late-breaking slider. He throws strikes with all three pitches and keeps his pitch counts down, allowing him to work deep into games. Some scouts project him as no more than a middle reliever in the big leagues, but his feel for pitching and his makeup may allow him to make it as a starter.
7 206 Washington Nationals Kevin Keyes OF Texas $125,000
Kevin Keyes is tied for the Texas team lead with 14 homers entering super-regional play, but he offers little beyond righthanded power and some arm strength. He has a long swing that most scouts don't believe will work with wood bats, and he's a well below-average defender in right field. He also has problems staying in shape (he carries more than his listed 225 pounds on his 6-foot-4 frame).
21 626 Washington Nationals Connor Rowe OF Texas
24 716 Washington Nationals Russ Moldenhauer 1B Texas
47 1417 Cincinnati Reds Tant Shepherd 1B Texas