Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
5 150 Cleveland Indians Cole Cook RHP Calif. $299,000
Cook's father (known by his stage name Peter MacKenzie) is an actor who has appeared in dozens of Hollywood productions, including the movies "Major League: Back to the Minors" and "It's Complicated" with Meryl Streep. A high school teammate of Twins prospect David Bromberg, Cook was a 36th-round pick of the Mariners in 2007 but did not sign. He missed his freshman season at Pepperdine in 2008 after a freak accident when he broke his wrist while helping to roll up the field tarp on a rainy day. After Pepperdine ace Brett Hunter signed with the A's in 2008, Cook assumed the Friday starter's role in 2009 and 2010 and has performed well, moving to Saturdays of late after the emergence of lefty Matt Bywater. Cook's rangy 6-foot-6, 200-pound frame and low three-quarters delivery are reminiscent of the Weaver brothers. He fires a 91-93 mph fastball, with a changeup and a slurvy 77-78 mph breaking ball. His change is a decent pitch, and scouts agree that his weakness is his curve. It shows sharp break at times, but Cook has trouble controlling it, due in part to his low arm slot. A rare college pitcher with significant projectability, Cook will need to sharpen his mechanics, command and secondary pitches to succeed in pro ball. If he does that, he fits comfortably as a mid- to back-of-the-rotation starter.
7 208 Baltimore Orioles Matt Bywater LHP Calif. $195,000
Pepperdine's Matt Bywater will benefit from the lack of lefties in this year's draft. He began the 2010 season in brilliant fashion by pitching a shutout at Cal State Fullerton, shutting down top prospects Gary Brown and Christian Colon in the process. He has continued to pitch well despite a lack of run support from the Pepperdine hitters and led the nation in shutouts while going 5-5, 2.29 overall. Calm and composed, Bywater works at a steady pace, keeps his emotions in control and has a businesslike demeanor on the mound. A poor man's Brian Matusz, Bywater uses pitching savvy to make up for what he lacks in velocity. He works his 88-89 mph fastball to either side of the plate, and he can get it to run, sink or dip. His curve and change seem to disappear from hitters' view at the last instant. He shows an advanced ability to mix his pitches, change speeds and locations and vary pitching patterns. Profiling as a mid- to back-of-the-rotation starter or situational lefty, Bywater could move quickly through a club's system.
36 1091 Tampa Bay Rays Robert Dickmann LHP Calif.