Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 83 Washington Nationals Rick Hague SS Rice Texas $430,200
Teams targeted Hague as a likely first-round pick after his summer with Team USA, when he shifted from shortstop to third base in deference to Cal State Fullerton's Christian Colon, tied for the team lead in batting (.371) and was named the top hitter at the World Baseball Challenge. But he started the spring in an extended funk, hitting just .290 and committing 22 errors in his first 38 games, bottoming out with a four-error game against Texas A&M. Hague has been on fire since, going on a 41-for-89 (.461) tear with just one error in his next 20 contests. Hague has strong hands, an easy righthanded stroke and a good ability to use the opposite field at times. He swings and misses badly at others and falls into ruts when he tries to pull every pitch he sees. His power and speed are fringe-average, though he has good instincts on the bases and is a better runner under way. He has the arm strength to play shortstop or third base, but he lacks the range for short and doesn't have the true power for third. Scouts acknowledge that Hague has decent tools and love his makeup, but he doesn't profile well at any position because he doesn't have the quickness for second base or the offensive production for an outfield corner. Though his resurgence still could land him in the third round, his future position remains in doubt.
2 84 Pittsburgh Pirates Mel Rojas Jr. OF Wabash Valley (Ill.) CC Ill. $423,900
Rojas is a lock to become the highest draft pick ever out of Wabash Valley CC, surpassing Toby Matchulat, a Cubs 11th-rounder two years ago. The son of the former big league closer of the same name, Mel Jr. could go as high as the second round to a team that views him as a five-tool athlete. He's the most debated prospect in the Midwest, as some see him as a tweener who doesn't fit the profile at any outfield position. A 6-foot-3, 200-pound switch-hitter, Rojas has good bat speed and strength, but his flat swing results in a lot of grounders and he doesn't barrel balls consistently. He led all national juco players with 61 steals in 64 attempts, though his naysayers don't think he'll be as prolific in pro ball because his pure speed grades out as just slightly above-average. He may not be quick enough to play center field at the major league level, though he has the arm strength to move to right field. The consensus among area scouts is that he's a fourth- to fifth-round talent, but he'll get picked higher than that. He turned down offers to sign out of the Dominican Republic, and went undrafted a year ago when he redshirted at Wabash Valley.
3 85 Baltimore Orioles Dan Klein RHP UCLA Calif. $499,900
An outstanding quarterback at Anaheim's famed Servite High, the 6-foot-3, 190-pound Klein turned down numerous college football scholarship offers to play baseball at UCLA. Selected by the Orioles in the 24th round of the 2007 draft, Klein struggled in his first season at UCLA in 2008 and then took a medical redshirt in 2009 due to shoulder problems, so he is a draft-eligible sophomore. Pitching exclusively as a closer in 2010, Klein has found his niche and was having a terrific season at 5-0, 2.23 with nine saves, with 46 strikeouts and seven walks in 40 innings. While Klein may not project as a closer in pro ball, he is perfectly suited to work as a set-up man. He relies on three effective pitches: a 91-93 mph fastball which he uses to run in on a hitters' hands; a changeup and a downer curveball, which hitters find difficult to read and time.
4 86 Kansas City Royals Mike Antonio SS Washington HS, New York N.Y. $411,000
Antonio, who is from the same high school that produced Manny Ramirez, ranked as the No. 56 prospect on BA's High School Top 100 list last fall after a strong showing on the showcase circuit, highlighted by an MVP performance at the Summer Rivarly Baseball Classic Invitational last August at Fenway Park. But scouts were disappointed with him this spring, and his stock dropped. On the right day you'll see him hit well and square balls up, but often he has a big swing with a pull-happy approach. He has a wide open set-up and a big leg kick, and his righthanded swing is longer than it was last year. His 6-foot-2, 180-pound frame generates solid raw power, but he is still learning to tap into it. Scouts say he also has become thicker and slower than he was last year. He was an average runner in the past, but scouts clocked him up the line as slow as 4.6 seconds this spring. He has a tendency to be a little too flashy at short, at the expense of making the routine play. He has good hands but tends to get himself in the wrong position to field the ball, and his arm is fringe-average. He's probably good enough to play shortstop in college but figures to outgrow the position in pro ball. A St. John's recruit, Antonio projects as a sixth- to 10th-round pick.
5 87 Cleveland Indians Tony Wolters SS Rancho Buena Vista HS, Vista, Calif. Calif. $1,350,000
Wolters, a San Diego recruit, was the MVP of the 2009 Aflac All-American game at Petco Park in San Diego, an impressive accomplishment considering the field was filled with elite prospects such as Jameson Taillon and Bryce Harper. Undersized (5-foot-10, 180 pounds) for any position on the field except the middle infield, Wolters almost certainly will shift to second base as a pro. He is a sensational defensive player, displaying remarkable playmaking ability, fluid actions and quick hands. Wolters has enough arm for shortstop, but his below-average speed and range make him a better fit on the right side of the infield. He's smart with strong leadership qualities and baseball instincts. Wolters' batting stance and hitting style are unique. He begins with the bat in a straight up and down posture, his hands placed near his right hip. His wide, spread-out stance in his lower half gives Wolters a bit of a Gateway Arch look. As a pitch approaches, Wolters moves his hands into a launch position and then lets the bat fly, using a pronounced sweeping upper-cut. At times, he appears to release his top hand off the bat a fraction too quickly, in effect swinging with one hand. While his swing and set-up are not traditional, it is hard to quibble with the results. He is a patient and savvy hitter, showing a knack for extending pitch counts as he waits for the ball he wants to attack. Wolters projects as an average to slightly above-average hitter with slightly below-average power.
6 88 Arizona Diamondbacks Robby Rowland RHP Cloverdale (Calif.) HS Calif. $395,000
When scouts use the term "projection righthander," Rowland is exactly the type of pitcher they're talking about with his body type, athleticism and bloodlines. At 6-foot-6, 210 pounds, Rowland looks the part of a young Josh Johnson. He is one of the top basketball players in California and could have accepted scholarships to small Division I programs as a shooting guard. Rowland's father Rich is a former big league catcher (Tigers and Red Sox from 1990-1995), and his older brother is a college catcher. As for his actual abilities, Rowland pitches with an 87-90 mph fastball and touches 92. He uses a split-finger fastball as his primary out pitch, with an inconsistent overhand curveball, a changeup and recently developed cutter/slider. Rowland has a loose, easy, quick arm stroke from an overhand slot. When he takes his time to get out over his front leg, he gets good tilt and late run and his curveball then shows as future average pitch. He has signed with Oregon.
7 89 New York Mets Blake Forsythe C Tennessee Tenn. $392,400
The younger brother of former Arkansas star and current Padres farmhand Logan Forsythe, Blake chose to stay in the Volunteer state after attending high school in Memphis. Forsythe broke though with a first-team all-Southeastern Conference sophomore season, showing his brother's trademark patience (40 walks) as well as above-average raw power. He followed that with a strong summer for USA Baseball's college national team and entered the spring as a potential first-round pick. He maintained the power production as a junior, but in most other facets of his game Forsythe was struggling. He came out of the gate slowly and scouts thought he was pressing. Forsythe always has had swing-and-miss issues and has struggled even more with breaking balls this season. His patience at times fell into passivity, leading to more strikeouts. Forsythe's defensive tools include a plus arm—he threw out 35 percent of basestealers this season—and fringe-average receiving and blocking skills. Forsythe performed better as the year wore on and would benefit from a regional bid for the Volunteers. With college catching always at a premium, Forsythe could go anywhere from the third round to the seventh.
8 90 Houston Astros Austin Wates 2B Virginia Tech Va. $550,000
Scouts have had a hard time pinning down Wates this season because he profiles as a center fielder but plays right and first base for the Hokies. Ranked as the No. 15 prospect in the Cape last summer, Wates is a good athlete with a good track record of hitting for average. He has a medium-sized frame at 6-foot-1, 180 pounds and is an above-average runner. His arm is below-average but playable in center. He has below-average power as well, but it's not part of his game. Scouts universally describe his swing as unorthodox. It's not the typical short, flat path that you find in pure hitters and has a little bit of loop to it. Even so, he manages to consistently put the barrel on balls and does a good job working deep counts. Through 178 at-bats this spring, Wates was hitting .382/484/.624 with 25 extra-base hits and 15 stolen bases. He walked (29) more than he struck out (24) and leads Virginia Tech in runs with 51.
9 91 San Diego Padres Zach Cates RHP Northeast Texas CC Texas $765,000
Undrafted out of an Arkansas high school in 2008 and bypassed again at Northeast Texas CC last year, Cates won't be overlooked a third time. He spent most of his freshman season as a catcher, standing out for his strong arm and working just seven innings on the mound. A strong fall as a pitcher landed him on follow lists, and he has steadily risen up draft boards this spring. His fastball ranges from 90-93 mph to 95-97, and there should be more consistent velocity in his 6-foot-3, 195-pound frame. For an inexperienced pitcher, he has a relatively advanced changeup, which grades out as a better pitch than his curveball. His curve does have its moments, and he could have an easy plus fastball with two solid secondary pitches once he develops. His command and control still need work, but neither is a red flag. He's a tough competitor. Cates hasn't committed to a four-year school for 2010 and should be signable.
10 92 Oakland Athletics Aaron Shipman OF Brooks County HS, Quitman, Ga. Ga. $500,000
The "pop-up" player in Georgia this year shouldn't have been off the radar. Shipman comes from a baseball family, as his father Robert--a 10th-round pick in 1987 by the Tigers--is his high school coach and his brother Robert III is a freshman at Georgia. While his older brother is a slugging first baseman and baseclogger, Aaron Shipman is a fast-twitch athlete who compares favorably to anyone in Georgia's deep class of athletic center fielders. He just hasn't played in the East Cobb program as a south Georgia kid, but he was getting plenty of attention as the draft approached and could go in the second round. Shipman earns above-average grades from scouts in speed, throwing arm and future center field defense, though he could use some polish. His swing is perhaps just as exciting, as it's smooth and low-maintenance. Shipman also pitches and runs his fastball up to 91 mph, but he is a much better prospect in the field and doesn't figure to wind up at Mercer, his college commitment.
11 93 Toronto Blue Jays Chris Hawkins 3B North Gwinnett HS, Suwanee, Ga. Ga. $350,000
Hawkins is a high school shortstop who is projected to play third base if he winds up at Tennessee. Most scouts don't necessarily see him staying in the dirt as a pro, but they do see tools that stand out even among Georgia's deep, talented class of high school athletes. Most project him as a center fielder thanks to his above-average speed. That has some scouts dreaming of Hawkins, a lefthanded hitter, as a poor man's Colby Rasmus, but he isn't as easy or fluid as Rasmus was at the same stage. Hawkns also has arm strength, and if his 6-foot-3, 210-pound frame proves too big for him to stay in center, he is athletic enough to handle a corner. Hawkins doesn't have Rasmus' all-around hitting ability, but he has a track record of success and has shown the ability to catch up to good fastballs this spring. He has performed well in front of crosscheckers all spring, leading North Gwinnett to a playoff berth while surpassing double digits in home runs. He carried a 29-game hitting streak into the state 5-A playoff semifinals, having set school records with 14 homers, 19 doubles and 58 hits. The strong finish was pushing Hawkins up draft boards, and he was considered a potential second- or third-round selection.
12 94 Cincinnati Reds Devin Lohman SS Long Beach State Calif. $363,600
Following a Dirtbags shortstop lineage that has included Bobby Crosby, Troy Tulowitzki, Evan Longoria and Danny Espinosa, Lohman is an intriguing talent if not quite in that league. Blessed with above-average speed, Lohman, 6-foot-2 and 195 pounds, is an excellent athlete who could easily transition to less demanding defensive positions. His arm grades out to solid-average. He has worked hard to improve his defense and has a chance to stay at shortstop, though second base is his more likely home. At bat, Lohman has altered his approach in 2010 to use the whole field and focus on hitting line drives. His earlier attempts to be a lift and pull power hitter were ill-suited to his natural inclinations. The changes had paid off and Lohman was batting .415 at the end of the regular season, a difficult feat considering that Blair Field is possibly the best pitcher's park in college baseball. He blends an average arm and glove with above-average speed, and his advancement at bat should boost his draft stock in a year that's thin in college position players, particularly on the infield.
13 95 Chicago White Sox Addison Reed RHP San Diego State Calif. $358,200
As San Diego State's closer last year, Reed led the nation with 20 saves. He often entered games after a fellow named Strasburg had finished his work for the day. Hitters who were overjoyed to see Strasburg leave--and who thought they would have a party when Reed came in--were severely disappointed. In 2010, Reed has made a seamless transition as the Aztecs' Friday starter, going 8-1, 2.07 with 77 strikeouts and just 10 walks in 65 innings. Opponents were hitting .197 off the 6-foot-3, 215-pound Reed, who delivers a 91-92 mph fastball that can peak at 93-94. Reed does an excellent job of moving the pitch around the strike zone--in, out, up, down. He adds an effective two-plane curveball, which he can use to saw off either edge of the plate. One scout said of Reed, "He doesn't have the best stuff in the world, but he's having a good year and knows how to get guys out." As a pro, Reed will get a chance to start, but his bullpen experience will serve him well if he fails in that role.
14 96 Milwaukee Brewers Tyler Thornburg RHP Charleston Southern S.C. $351,900
Scouts and opposing coaches inevitably invoke Tim Lincecum when discussing Thornburg, which certainly is a compliment. It started last summer, when Thornburg closed for Brewster in the Cape Cod League. He struck out 18 in 17 innings and racked up eight saves, using a delivery similar to Lincecum's, and his size (5-foot-11, 190 pounds) is in the same ballpark, though he's thicker. That helped Thornburg hold up through the grind of being Charleston Southern's top pitcher as well as a middle-of-the-order hitter who often plays right field when he doesn't pitch. He made an early statement with a complete-game, 158-pitch victory against Florida, which won the Southeastern Conference regular-season crown. He also mixed in a loss at Presbyterian, the Big South's ninth-place team. A rough season with the bat and the impending draft prompted the Buccaneers to keep Thornburg's focus on the mound in the season's final month, and he ranked third in the Big South in strikeouts while leading the league with a .213 opponent average. He has top-five-rounds stuff with a low-90s fastball that has topped out at 95 mph. His fastball lacks life and can be pretty flat, which makes his power curveball his best pitch. Thornburg is still looking for a consistent third pitch to round out his repertoire. He's likely more of a middle reliever, a quick-armed set-up man in the Scot Shields mold who should be off the board by end of the fifth round.
15 97 Chicago Cubs Micah Gibbs C Louisiana State La. $350,000
Gibbs has the best receiving skills among catchers in the 2010 draft, and those and his ability to handle a pitching staff earn repeated comparisons to Jason Varitek. He doesn't have a cannon behind the plate, but his arm strength is average and he enhances it with a quick release and good accuracy. However, he had thrown out just 14 percent of basestealers entering NCAA regional play, down from 32 percent in his first two seasons. His hitting has gone in the other direction, as he was batting .392, up from .306 the previous two years and .212 with wood bats in the Cape Cod League last summer. A 5-foot-11, 207-pound switch-hitter, Gibbs has spread out his stance, added more balance and simplified his swing. He has strength, but his swing can get loopy at times and he doesn't have an abundance of bat speed or power. He may not be more than a .260 hitter with 10-12 homers annually in the majors, but his defensive ability should make him a starter. The scarcity of catchers often enhances their draft status, so Gibbs could sneak into the first or sandwich round.
16 98 Tampa Bay Rays Ryan Brett 2B Highline HS, Burien, Wash. Wash. $341,100
Brett is a throwback player who's fun to watch. He's always dirty, doesn't wear batting gloves and is a sparkplug who always plays at full speed. For most of the year he tried to switch-hit, but he reverted back to his natural righthanded swing as the draft drew near. He has a knack for getting the barrel on the ball, though sometimes he tries to play bigger than he is and scouts said they would like to see him embrace small ball. Brett is smallish at 5-foot-9 and 180 pounds, but he works out regularly with Josh Sale and is strong. Scouts are split on where he'll play defensively. Some believe he'll be able to stay at second base, while others say his actions are too choppy and the game will be too fast for him there. He's an above-average runner and could be an above-average defender in center field. The speed also makes him a terror on the basepaths, and some scouts think that if he fulfilled his commitment to Gonzaga that he could bat better than .400 and steal 40-50 bases a season. In professional ball, his ceiling would be a .285 hitter with about 12 home runs and 20 stolen bases a season. He'll likely be drafted around the third round and is considered signable.
17 99 Seattle Mariners Ryne Stanek RHP Blue Valley HS, Stilwell, Kan. Kan.
When scouts saw Stanek's 6-foot-4, 180 pound build and his ability to maintain a 90-92 mph fastball on the showcase circuit last summer, it was easy for them to project that he might throw in the mid-90s one day. That day came sooner than expected, as Stanek worked at 91-96 mph in his first game this spring. He has kept that velocity all spring, doing so with little effort. His delivery is fairly sound, though he does throw slightly across his body. His curveball is crisp and has two-plane break, giving him a second future plus pitch. He also throws a slider and changeup. Stanek is one of the cornerstones of a deep Arkansas recruiting class, but his step forward this spring means he'll likely bypass college.
18 100 Detroit Tigers Rob Brantly C UC Riverside Calif. $330,300
A draft-eligible sophomore, Brantly has a strong profile as a consistent backstop and patient lefthanded hitter. He enjoyed a breakout summer season in 2009 playing in the Northwoods League, batting .346/.411/.516 to earn top prospect recognition. Steady but not spectacular, Brantly is an exceptionally patient hitter. He does not have outstanding power, but he has the ability to drive the ball into the gaps and use the entire field. He employs a balanced and spread stance and may need to reduce the length of his stride. Drafted by the Nationals out of high school in the 46th round in 2008, Brantly is a good athlete for a catcher, and he runs well and has a mature backstop's frame. Defensively, Brantly has a strong, accurate throwing arm and quick release, with pop times that hover around 1.92 seconds, earning an above-average grade. He receives the ball well, is relaxed and comfortable behind the plate, and displays a knack for handling any pitch in any location without difficulty. Brantly's only below-average tool is power, which likely will relegate him to the bottom third of a big league order.
19 101 Atlanta Braves Joe Leonard 3B Pittsburgh Pa. $324,900
Leonard's father, John, was a first-round pick of the Orioles in 1982, and Joe stepped into Pitt's starting lineup as a freshman. After two solid seasons, Leonard exploded as a junior this spring, hitting .452/.507/.719 with eight homers and 60 RBIs though 199 at-bats. The 6-foot-5, 220-pound Leonard has below-average game power currently, but he has shown good pop with wood bats in batting practice and projects for average power if he can add loft to his flat swing. His swing is long, making him vulnerable against good fastballs on the inner half, but he has good bat speed and feel for hitting, so he barrels up balls consistently. He projects as an average hitter. Leonard also reaches 92-93 mph off the mound as Pitt's closer, and his arm is above-average at third base. He is not a finished product defensively but has good feet and solid instincts, and he projects as a solid-average defender. He is a below-average runner but not a clogger. Leonard projects as a second- to third-round pick.
20 102 Minnesota Twins Pat Dean LHP Boston College Mass. $319,500
Like Virginia Tech's Jesse Hahn, Dean was a skinny, projectable Connecticut prepster in 2007, and like Hahn he blossomed in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Dean's fastball sat in the 84-88 mph range in high school, but he touched 93 mph and held his velocity deep into games as a sophomore at BC last spring. Dean has not been at his best this spring due to elbow inflammation, which caused him to miss a start in mid-March and another three weeks later. But MRIs and X-rays revealed no structural damage, and the Eagles eased him back into action. Through 67 innings, he was 5-1, 3.76 with 51 strikeouts and 10 walks, demonstrating his outstanding control. The 6-foot-1, 175-pound Dean is a competitive lefthander with excellent feel for pitching, earning comparisons to Glen Perkins. He settled into the 88-91 mph range with his fastball this spring and has topped out at 92 on occasion. He has good command of a four-pitch mix, but his solid-average changeup is his best pitch. His slider and curveball both rate as fringe-average offerings. Dean's frame gives scouts pause, but his polish gives him a good chance to reach the big leagues as a back-end starter.
21 103 Texas Rangers Jordan Akins OF Union Grove HS, McDonough, Ga. Ga. $350,000
Some scouts compare Akins, who is a Central Florida signee, to Top 200 talent Niko Goodrum, and in most cases Goodrum comes out on the short end. Like Goodrum, Akins is tall and lean but packs 210 pounds onto his wide receiver's frame. Despite his size, he runs the 60-yard dash in 6.4 seconds and has fast-twitch muscle to spare. Some consider him the state's best athlete, which is quite a statement considering the depth of athletes in the Peach State this year. He has a plus arm, though not quite as strong as Goodrum's, and has shown the natural bat speed and hitting ability to catch up to good fastballs. Breaking balls still give him fits, so his aptitude once he becomes a full-time baseball player will be crucial to whether he reaches his considerable ceiling. Akins is raw but has enough natural instincts to thrive despite being a part-time baseball player. He also could go out in the first two rounds, particularly to a team with extra picks. The only other question is football. Akins turned down Georgia for Central Florida's two-sport offer. He was an explosive offensive player in high school, playing quarterback and wide receiver while also returning kicks and scoring close to 20 touchdowns.
22 104 Florida Marlins J.T. Realmuto SS Albert HS, Midwest City, Okla. Okla. $600,000
Catcher/shortstop J.T. Realmuto set national high school records this spring with 88 hits and 119 RBIs. A 6-foot-1, 190-pound righthanded hitter, he has an unorthodox style at the plate. He has a wide stance and leans the bat behind his right arm, an approach that may not work against better pitching or with wood bats. He has good bat speed and the ball jumps off his bat. A quarterback who led Carl Albert High to the state 5-A football title in the fall, Realmuto has arm strength and good actions in the field. If he can stay behind the plate, that will enhance his value. His set-up makes it unclear how high he'll go in the draft, and if he doesn't turn pro he'll head to Oklahoma State. He's the nephew of Cowboys wrestling coach John Smith, who won two Olympic gold medals and has guided Oklahoma State to five national championships.
23 105 San Francisco Giants Carter Jurica SS Kansas State Kan. $304,200
Jurica, who could go in the seventh to 10th round, is the best 2010 prospect on the state's lone NCAA regional team. He's a 5-foot-11, 185-pounder with solid if not spectacular all-around tools. He has a sound righthanded stroke with some pop, good plate discipline and slightly above-average speed. He gets the job done as a college shortstop, but his range and arm may be better suited for second base or a utility role in pro ball.
24 106 St. Louis Cardinals Sam Tuivailala SS Aragon HS, San Mateo, Calif. Calif. $299,700
High school talents that pop up the summer after their junior year quickly gain a lot of attention. Tuivailala attended a small showcase in Sacramento last summer and started a lot of buzz when he hit 93 mph on the gun. He also showed bat speed and strength as a position player and is being considered by some scouts as a third baseman. At 6-foot-2, 185-pounds, Tuivailala has good size and strength and a projectable frame. He has long arms and legs and has athletic agility. His secondary stuff is evolving. His curveball is a tweener pitch that should be a slider from his three-quarters slot, and he lacks a third pitch. He sits in the 88-89 mph range, with movement. He lacks a lot of mound time and an organization that is strong in pitching development will value him most. Tuivailala joins Judge in Fresno State's recruiting class.
25 107 Colorado Rockies Josh Rutledge SS Alabama Ala. $295,000
Rutledge could go in the first three rounds to a team that believes in his bat. He's a smooth athlete with good infield actions, in the Adam Everett mold. Rutledge doesn't make the flashy play in the hole because he's better going to his left than to his right. He has enough arm and range for short. Offensively, he had a solid season and runs a tick above-average, with sound baserunning instincts. He lacks strength in his hands and forearms and may never drive the ball enough to be a big league regular, despite his good defense. He also lacks plate discipline and has trouble catching up to good velocity.
26 108 Philadelphia Phillies Cameron Rupp C Texas Texas $287,000
Teams covet catchers with power and arm strength, which put Rupp in position to be a possible first-round pick. But he hasn't had the numbers to put him there, batting .313/.401/.498 though conference tournament play. Scouts have admired his strength since he won the home run derby at the 2006 Aflac Classic, though they aren't sure he'll be able to tap into his power as a pro. He has an arm bar in his righthanded swing that allows pitchers to tie him up inside with good velocity, and he chases too many offspeed pitches and offerings up in the strike zone. Rupp has worked hard to improve his defense and keep his 6-foot-2, 235-pound frame under control, but scouts still worry that his size and lack of athleticism will affect his long-term ability to remain behind the plate. He has plus arm strength and has shortened what once was a long release, and while it's still not compact, he has thrown out 40 percent of basestealers this year. He has gotten better as a receiver and calls most of the pitches for college baseball's most talented pitching staff. He's similar to Ryan Garko, who was a third-round pick out of Stanford, with more power and defensive ability than Garko had.
27 109 Los Angeles Dodgers Leon Landry OF Louisiana State La. $284,400
Landry was a regular on Louisiana State's 2008 College World Series club as a freshman, but he lost his starting job midway through 2009. After helping the Tigers win the national title as a part-timer, he starred in the Cape Cod League, hitting .364 with wood bats. Landry profiles as a potential four-tool center fielder. He's having his best college season to date, reflecting a more mature approach at the plate. He no longer sells out for power and pulls off pitches, and he's doing a much better job of controlling the strike zone. A 5-foot-11, 195-pound lefthanded batter, he projects as a possible .275 hitter with 15 homers in the big leagues. He has slightly above-average speed and keen defensive instincts that allow him to play center field. If he can't stick in center as a pro, his below-average arm would dictate a move to left field, which in turn would put more pressure on his bat.
28 110 Boston Red Sox Sean Coyle SS Germantown Academy, Fort Washington, Pa. Pa. $1,300,000
Coyle's older brother Tommy was North Carolina's starting second baseman as a freshman this spring, and Sean will join him in Chapel Hill next year unless a major league club opens up its checkbook. Coyle is undersized at 5-foot-8, 175 pounds, but the consensus among scouts is that he has a legitimate chance to be an everyday big league second baseman in the Brian Roberts mold. He played shortstop for Germantown Academy and spent some time at DH this spring because of a mild forearm strain. Coyle might not be tall, but he has plenty of strength in his compact righthanded swing, and he makes consistent, hard contact to all fields, though he projects for below-average power. He has above-average speed and is aggressive on the basepaths. Coyle has sure hands and good infield instincts, and he should have solid-average range and arm strength at second base. He is a confident, competitive grinder who gets the most out of his quality tools.
29 111 Los Angeles Angels Wendell Soto SS Riverview HS, Sarasota, Fla. Fla. $274,500
Up-the-middle talent is always at a premium, and that pushes players such as Soto up some draft boards. A shortstop who switch-hits, he was Florida International's backup plan after Panthers recruit Manny Machado became a cinch first-round pick. Soto isn't physical at 5-foot-8 but can swing the bat and is an excellent defender at short. His draft profile rose when he showed improved speed, going from an average runner to a plus runner and turning in 4.05-second times to first base from the left side. Soto has soft hands and first-step quickness at short, though his arm is fringe-average for the position. He's a solid athlete but may not be strong enough to go out and hit with wood.
30 112 New York Yankees Rob Segedin 3B Tulane La. $377,500
Segedin injured his lower back in the Cape Cod League in the summer of 2008, and continued back problems and a shoulder injury led Tulane to shut him down after five games last spring. He was healthy again by the summer, when he helped Bourne win its first-ever Cape championship, and has wielded one of the most potent bats in college baseball this year, hitting .434/.516/.788. Segedin has plenty of strength in his 6-foot-3, 220-pound frame, and he makes consistent, hard contact. His righthanded stroke is geared more toward line drives than loft, but he does show the ability to lift mistakes out of the park. He's not nimble on the bases or at third base, but he manages to get the job done defensively. He has plenty of arm at the hot corner, and his fastball topped out at 94 mph when the Green Wave used him as a reliever two years ago. Because of his back, he has pitched sparingly since. There aren't many quality bats like Segedin's in this draft, but his leverage as a draft-eligible sophomore at an academically strong program could drive up his price and down his draft position.