Round

Players signed indicated in Bold

Next
Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 51 Washington Nationals Sammy Solis LHP San Diego Calif. $1,000,000
During the majority of his tenure at USD, Solis was overshadowed by the likes of Brian Matusz and Kyle Blair. His coming-out party in 2009 never materialized due to a herniated disc in his back, which prompted him to take a medical redshirt. However, Solis, an unsigned 18th-round pick out of an Arizona high school in 2007, has bounced back to go 8-1, 2.49 in 2010. Most observers expect a pitcher of his 6-foot-5, 228-pound size to be a flamethrower, but Solis is instead a canny command, movement and control pitcher. His fastball varies from 88-92 mph and has good life up in the zone. He adds a fine changeup that dives down and away from righthanded hitters; it's his best pitch. Solis can add or subtract speed with his curveball, varying it from 72-78 mph, and at times it too is an out pitch. As Solis leaves his back injury behind, he could gain velocity and durability due to improved conditioning. A devout Catholic with a penchant for public service, Solis' family owns an AIDS orphanage in South Africa. A healthy Solis profiles solidly in the middle of a big league rotation.
2 52 Pittsburgh Pirates Stetson Allie RHP St. Edward HS, Lakewood, Ohio Ohio $2,250,000
Based on his mid-90s fastball and hard slider, Allie entered 2010 as a likely first-round pick, but he had a reputation as more thrower than pitcher. He took a significant step forward in May, dialing his heater up to 98-99 mph and his slider up to 88-89 while showing more polish than ever before in consecutive starts, giving him a chance to go in the top 10 picks. He wasn't as electric or under control as much in his next two outings, so he'll probably go closer to the middle or end of the first round. His father Danny is a former scout and his coach at St. Edward, and he let Stetson throw 143 pitches in a complete-game win in the state Division I regional finals, in which he struck out nine but walked seven and hit two batters. Though he'll struggle with his control and command, the only pitcher in this draft with comparable pure stuff is Jameson Taillon. The 6-foot-4, 225-pound Allie has cleaned up his delivery and command, and he maintains his overpowering stuff into the late innings. He had expressed a desire to hit, and he does have some of the best raw power in the draft. He famously hit a broken-bat homer at the East Coast Professional Showcase last summer, though his swing has gotten long this spring. With his size, power and arm strength, he could be an early-round pick as a third baseman, but he now accepts that his future is on the mound. A North Carolina recruit, he'll be a draft-eligible sophomore in 2012 if he doesn't turn pro this summer.
3 53 Atlanta Braves Todd Cunningham OF Jacksonville State Ala. $674,100
Scouts got familiar with Jacksonville State last year, following hard-throwing righthander Ben Tootle. Cunningham entered the season as a possible first-round pick, and he could still sneak in that high. He has a track record with wood, hitting .387 last year to lead the Cape Cod League after hitting .310 in the Texas Collegiate League in 2008. He hadn't dominated the Ohio Valley Conference this spring, but he was clearly the best hitter in the conference and its best prospect. For some, Cunningham fits the center-field profile well enough to be an everyday player. He's intelligent and has a good baseball IQ. He switch-hits and stays inside the ball from both sides, working counts with a patient, disciplined approach. Some project him to be an above-average hitter with fringe-average power, projecting to 10-15 home runs annually. He's a solid-average runner, with his throwing arm being his weakest tool. He played one game at shortstop and would profile well at second base, but he's a better fit at shortstop if his bat can carry him. Detractors see Cunningham's range and arm as short for center field, and his power short for a corner spot. His safe bat and consistency likely will push him into the second round.
4 54 Kansas City Royals Brett Eibner OF/RHP Arkansas Ark. $1,250,000
Eibner is the best two-way prospect in the 2010 draft. Teams are evenly split about whether he has more potential as a pitcher or an outfielder. A fourth-round pick out of high school by the Astros, he has impressive power in his arm and bat. He has added significant polish as both a pitcher and a hitter this spring, making the decision about his future no easier. After not pitching during the fall while recovering from a mild elbow strain sustained in the Cape Cod League, he has refined his command and secondary pitches. His fastball velocity can be inconsistent, as he'll sit at 88-91 mph during some games and 92-94 in others, peaking at 97. His mid-80s slider/cutter is a plus pitch at times, and he has improved his feel for a changeup. The 6-foot-4, 210-pounder has a loose delivery that he repeats well. Eibner also has considerable upside as a power hitter. He can crush the ball to all fields, and he has done a better job this year of recognizing pitches and using the opposite field. Though he's strictly a righthanded hitter in games, he wowed Cape observers with a lefty batting-practice display last summer. His arm is an asset in the outfield, and while his solid speed and athleticism give him a chance to stick in center field at the next level, he projects more as a right fielder. Eibner's preference is to hit, but it remains to be seen if he'll get his wish. He didn't hurt his cause by hitting three homers in the Razorbacks' regional opener against Grambling State, his first game back after missing the Southeastern Conference tournament with a hairline fracture in his right hand.
5 55 Cleveland Indians LeVon Washington OF Chipola (Fla.) JC Fla. $1,200,000
Washington is one of the biggest enigmas of the last two drafts. Born in Guam to a military family, he entered 2009 as perhaps the fastest prep talent in the country and earned Johnny Damon comparisons for his hitting ability, speed and lack of arm strength. A shoulder injury left Washington with a 20 arm on the 20-80 scale, but the Rays looked past that and his Boras Corp. representation and drafted him 30th overall. Washington failed to sign; he also failed to qualify at Florida and wound up at Chipola JC. The Indians and Washington had disappointing seasons, and scouts still don't know quite what to make of him even after another year of evaluation. Athletic and quick, Washington hasn't shown the explosive speed he once did and doesn't run hard consistently. He also didn't run on fall scout day at Chipola, and some scouts now consider him more of an above-average runner than the top-of-the-scale grades he got in the fall of 2008. His arm has improved, to a 30 grade, but he did play the outfield and should be an average defender. Clubs that like Washington are buying the bat, however. Despite a spread-out stance in which he leans over the plate, he barrels up balls consistently, thanks to excellent hand-eye coordination and quick wrists. He's not a slap hitter and would likely have to change to a more conventional stance to hit for average power. Washington doesn't figure to go as high this year but still fits inside the first two rounds.
6 56 Arizona Diamondbacks J.R. Bradley RHP Nitro (W.Va.) HS W.Va. $643,500
West Virginia's Jedd Gyorko isn't the only player generating interest in the Mountain State this season. Bradley, a prep righthander from outside Charleston, was also coming on strong. A lanky, projectable righthander at 6-foot-4, 180 pounds, his fastball ranges from 88-92 mph, but sits at 89-90 and he can touch 93-94 a couple of times in a game. His secondary stuff is raw, but he has shown flashes that the pitches could be average. He has outstanding control for a high school arm. He reportedly has walked just two batters in the last two seasons. Bradley has drawn comparisons to another 2010 righty in Keenan Kish. Bradley offers more projection, but less polish than Kish. He is committed to North Carolina State but figures to be signable. Scouts can't reach a consensus on where Bradley will get drafted, but considering his projection and signability there is little chance he lasts past the fifth round.
7 57 Boston Red Sox Brandon Workman RHP Texas Texas $800,000
The Longhorns have one of the best college pitching staffs in recent memory, as evidenced by their team 2.14 ERA in mid-May--and the fact that Workman, their No. 3 starter, could be a first-round pick. The Phillies drafted him in the third round out of high school, but held firm with a $275,000 offer and wouldn't give him the $350,000 he sought. Now he could get four to five times that amount. Unable to secure a spot in the Longhorns rotation as a sophomore, Workman has been more focused and efficient this spring. His best pitch is a knockout curveball, and he pairs it with a 90-92 mph fastball that peaks at 96. He has developed a high-80s cutter as a strikeout pitch against lefthanders, and he also has some feel for a changeup. His command is better than ever, and he now realizes that he's more effective when he doesn't overthrow, which causes his pitches to flatten out. Workman earned all-star honors in the Cape Cod League the last two summers, leading the league in strikeouts after his freshman season.
8 58 Houston Astros Vince Velasquez RHP Garey HS, Pomona, Calif. Calif. $655,830
Doctors diagnosed a stress fracture and a ligament strain in Vincent Velasquez's right elbow in January 2009, so his arm was placed in a cast for six weeks and he then went on a lengthy rehab program. He played shortstop and the outfield and even tried throwing lefthanded, but he didn't pitch last season. His first serious return to the mound was at MLB's preseason showcase in February, and he was the star of the event with a sensational one-inning stint. He fired a 93 mph fastball and added a wicked curveball and drop-dead changeup. The 6-foot-3, 180-pounder's outings during the spring were uneven, to put it mildly, and he was dreadful in an early season start in front of 40 scouts. Velasquez is a legitimate two-way player and could also serve as a switch-hitting infielder at Cal State Fullerton if he doesn't sign. While his actions and arm are impressive on the left side of the infield, his range, speed and bat are not early-round material. Velasquez exhibits a loose, angular and projectable build, a fluid delivery and tremendous stuff when he's on. To sign him away from Fullerton, however, scouts will need to be convinced that Velasquez has completely committed to pitching.
9 59 San Diego Padres Jedd Gyorko 2B West Virginia W.Va. $614,700
Gyorko is on team's draft boards for one reason: his bat. His position on those boards comes down to where teams think he'll play. A shortstop for the Mountaineers, no one is giving him a chance to stay there as a pro. He's labeled as a bad-body guy at 5-foot-10, 185 pounds and will have to work hard to keep himself in shape. His arm is average and he gets mixed reviews on his infield actions. Some think he can play second base, while others say the range will be too short. Third base is an option, but he's not a big power guy, as it grades out as an average tool. He's an above-average hitter, though, thanks to a good, balanced approach at the plate, a good feel for the strike zone and an ability to hit to all fields. He hit .409 and .421 with 16 home runs in his first two seasons at West Virginia. Through 195 at-bats in 2010, he was hitting .369/.462/.718 with 15 home runs, 36 walks and just 17 strikeouts. The consensus is that the bat is easy to believe in and in a draft short on college hitters, Gyorko doesn't figure to be available when the second round begins.
10 60 Oakland Athletics Yordy Cabrera 3B Lakeland (Fla.) HS Fla. $1,250,000
The Yordy Cabrera story has several themes that all scouts are familiar with. He moved to the U.S. at age 14 from the Dominican Republic and is already 19. In other words, he's a prep senior who's two years older than junior-college freshman Bryce Harper. Cabrera, whose father Basilio is a former player and the Tigers' Rookie-level Gulf Coast League manager, has spent plenty of time around pro clubhouses and wood bats, and has two plus-plus tools. He has excellent raw power and one of the draft's strongest arms for an infielder, and he has the hands, average speed and actions to at least begin his pro career as a shortstop. Most believe he'll have to move to third base eventually because he's already 6-foot-3, 200 pounds, but should be able to stay in the dirt. As a pitcher, he has launched his fastball into the low to mid-90s, and his arm profiles for third or right field if he has to move. His value will depend on his bat, which remains raw and inconsistent despite his bloodlines. Cabrera kills mistakes, especially hanging breaking balls, but at times has trouble gearing up to velocity. He was unlikely to last past the supplemental round, and if his bat doesn't develop he could move to the mound.
11 61 Toronto Blue Jays Griffin Murphy LHP Redlands (Calif.) East Valley HS Calif. $800,000
As the 2010 spring season opened, Murphy quickly established himself as the premier lefthander in the Southern California prep ranks, and he joins Dylan Covey in San Diego's recruiting class. Strong and durable, in both frame and pitching style Murphy resembles Angels lefty Joe Saunders. While not a flamethrower, Murphy likes to establish his 89-92 mph fastball early in a game and work his other pitches off of it. He shows an uncanny knack for manipulating his fastball--he can run it in, run it away, sink it or turn it over. Few lefties can succeed without a quality curveball, and Murphy has one. His sweeping, 75 mph bender exhibits fine shape and two-plane movement, but he needs to work the curve down in the strike zone more consistently. Mechanically solid, Murphy loads up well on his back hip and does a fine job of accelerating his arm at release. A fast worker, he may benefit from slowing his motion down a shade and by improving his leg drive. Murphy's size (6-foot-3, 195 pounds), stuff and pitching smarts could easily push him up into the first two rounds.
12 62 Cincinnati Reds Ryan LaMarre OF Michigan Mich. $587,700
Since breaking his thumb diving for a fly ball in the third game of the season and missing the next 18 games, LaMarre has returned with a vengeance and played himself into first-round consideration. He's one of the best college athletes available, a 6-foot-2, 206-pounder with plus-plus speed. Though the injury has cost him some strength in his wrist and left him basically swinging with one hand, he has consistently squared balls up and batted .424/.455/.660. He has enough bat speed and lift in his righthanded stroke to project as a plus hitter with slightly above-average power. His tools and performance have erased memories of a weak summer in the Cape Cod League in 2009. While he drew just four walks in 35 games this spring, he has shown solid plate discipline in the past. Though the Wolverines eased LaMarre back into their lineup as a left fielder, he's a legitimate center fielder with a decent arm. Area scouts love his makeup, raving about his gamer mentality, work ethic and value as a teammate.
13 63 Chicago White Sox Jake Petricka RHP Indiana State Ind. $540,000
Petricka may have had more helium than any player a month before the draft, with his stock rising so rapidly that it could have carried him into the first round. He cooled off by season's end, and now figures to go in the sandwich or second round. He began his college career at Iowa Western CC, where he sat out 2007 while recovering from Tommy John surgery and mostly pitched in the high 80s. He touched 94 early in the 2009 season after transferring to Indiana State, but didn't hold that velocity and ultimately turned down the Yankees, who took him in the 34th round as a draft-eligible sophomore. Petricka was on follow lists for 2010, and early in the season he was nothing special, sitting at 90 mph and featuring a soft curveball. Starting in mid-April, he made a quantum leap and began pitching at 92-94 mph and reaching 98 with his fastball, holding his velocity deep into games. His breaking ball now has some power to it and grades as a solid-average pitch. Scouts have noted that the 6-foot-4, 180-pounder is doing a much better job of using his legs and finishing his delivery.
14 64 Milwaukee Brewers Jimmy Nelson RHP Alabama Ala. $570,600
Nelson emerged as the Crimson Tide's top prospect, surpassing middle infielders Josh Rutledge and preseason All-American Ross Wilson. He has the size (6-foot-6, 250 pounds) and hard, heavy fastball to profile as a middle-of-the-rotation starter. Nelson has had an inconsistent career as he's honed his mechanics, and an inconsistent junior season, peaking with strong starts against Kentucky early in the season and with a complete-game gem against Mississippi in mid-May. The latter start was key, as many scouts weren't sure he wanted the ball in big-game situations. Nelson can run his fastball up to 95-96 mph at times, and he has learned to rely more on movement and less on velocity. When his fastball is in the 88-93 range, it has natural, hard sink. He complements it with an 80-84 mph power breaking ball that scouts call a slider, as at times it has some depth. At his best, both pitches grade out as above-average. His changeup remains below-average but has its moments, and he tosses in a curve from time to time that some scouts believe suits his arm slot better than the slider. Nelson's arm action is decent, but he still loses his release point from time to time and struggles to throw strikes. He has improved his mound demeanor and has matured so that fielding miscues or a lack of run support don't disrupt his rhythm as often. He failed in a try as a closer last season, and some evaluators believe being in a rotation suits him better. Teams that like him as a starter will be tempted starting in the second round, and he finished the regular season strong.
15 65 Chicago Cubs Reggie Golden OF Wetumpka (Ala.) HS Ala. $720,000
The top player in Alabama's high school ranks for the last two seasons, Golden is an Alabama recruit whose build and tools remind some evaluators of another Southeastern Conference player of recent vintage, current Brewers farmhand Kentrail Davis. He's a five-tool athlete with present strength who profiles as a right fielder, even though he stands less than 6 feet tall. Golden impressed scouts by grinding through the spring despite a hamstring pull that slowed him all season. He still ran average to above-average times despite his injury, but as he matures, speed won't be a major part of his game. Power will, as Golden has impressive strength and raw bat speed. His approach at the plate is raw, and he lacks the plate discipline that allowed Davis to star from the start of his SEC career. His best present tool is his above-average arm, which fits well in right field. He plays with energy and is coachable, and he'll have to adjust to better pitching with his raw hitting skills.
16 66 Tampa Bay Rays Jake Thompson RHP Long Beach State Calif. $555,000
Due to California high school transfer rules, Thompson did not pitch varsity baseball in his junior season at Wilson High, which is directly across the street from Blair Field, Long Beach State's home field. He graduated from Wilson a semester early to play for the Dirtbags. Thompson's college career has been a mixed bag, with bursts of brilliance interspersed with wildness and control problems. Relying heavily on his fastball, Thompson is an aggressive hurler who resembles, in frame and style, former big leaguer Troy Percival. His 92-94 mph fastball peaks at 95, and Thompson adds an excellent changeup which he mixes in sparingly. Thompson's primary weakness is his curveball, a pitch he short-arms and doesn't finish off cleanly. Scouts think that Thompson's results don't match his talent because of his unusual arm stroke, which will need to be cleaned up, and a weak delivery finish in which he circles away from the plate. He has the arm and raw stuff to be a mid-rotation starter, but he will more likely end up in the bullpen.
17 67 Seattle Mariners Marcus Littlewood SS Pine View HS, St. George, Utah Utah $900,000
Littlewood was on the 2008 Team USA 16U squad, and his bases-clearing double brought home a gold medal in the Pan Am Youth Games against Mexico. Last year, he was named Utah's high school player of the year. While he's been on the prospect map for awhile, however, Littlewood draws mixed opinions on his ultimate value. Skeptics say he has no standout tools: He's not rangy enough to stay at shortstop and won't hit enough to play third. Those that like him see him as a player whose sum is greater than his parts. Littlewood is a slow-twitch athlete, which shows up in his swing and his speed. He is currently a below-average runner. He lacks the range to stay at shortstop, though his hands are soft and his arm is at least average. He is a natural righthanded hitter and took up switch-hitting as a freshman in high school. He profiles as a .270 hitter and, even after outslugging Kris Bryant at a spring workout for the Blue Jays by hitting 15 home runs in a row, he'll likely hit no more than 12-15 homers a season as a pro. Littlewood's father Mike was drafted as a third baseman out of Brigham Young by the Brewers in 1988 and is now the head coach for Dixie State in Utah. Having grown up around the game, he has great baseball instincts, works hard and plays the game the right way. He's probably a third-round talent, but a team that likes him may have to take him as high as the supplemental first round to buy him out of his commitment to San Diego.
18 68 Detroit Tigers Drew Smyly LHP Arkansas Ark. $1,100,000
Smyly's senior high school season in 2007 was marred by back trouble, and he redshirted in his first year at Arkansas after sustaining a stress fracture in his elbow during an intrasquad game. He started to come on at the end of last season, striking out 12 and coming within two outs of a no-hitter in an NCAA regional championship game against Oklahoma. Though he doesn't have a signature pitch, Smyly has been the Razorbacks' ace this spring. He mainly works with a fastball and a cutter/slider. He can add and subtract from his fastball, ranging from 86-93 mph, and works in the low to mid-80s with the cut/slider. He also mixes in a curveball and changeup. Smyly has exceptional feel for pitching, which allowed him to thrive even when a blister on his middle finger prevented him from gripping the seams on the ball for a couple of starts at midseason. Six-foot-3 and 190 pounds, he throws strikes on a good downward angle to the plate. In a draft bereft of lefthanders, Smyly shouldn't last past the top three rounds, though his extra leverage as a draft-eligible sophomore could scare off some clubs.
19 69 Toronto Blue Jays Kellen Sweeney 3B Jefferson HS, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Iowa $600,000
Sweeney's older brother Ryan was a White Sox second-round pick in 2003 and now starts in right field for the Athletics. Ryan was the better athlete—he could have been drafted just as high as a pitcher—but Kellen is a better hitter at the same stage of their careers. The 6-foot-1, 180-pounder has a quick lefthanded bat, a fluid stroke and good pull power. He struggled on the showcase circuit last summer, but scouts don't hold that against him because he hurt his elbow pitching in the final game of his junior season and required Tommy John surgery in August. Though he's a slightly above-average runner, Sweeney doesn't cover enough ground to stick at shortstop in pro ball. Assuming he regains his previous arm strength, he could make a good third baseman, and it's possible he could handle second base. Sweeney will go a few rounds later than his brother did, but that should be high enough to divert him from attending San Diego.
20 70 Atlanta Braves Andrelton Simmons SS Western Oklahoma State JC Okla. $522,000
Like Connors State outfielder Marcus Knecht, Simmons is an Oklahoma junior college player who went from obscurity to scouts' must-see lists. Simmons turned down small bonus offers to sign out of Curacao at age 16, and that would have spelled the end of any professional baseball hopes if Western Oklahoma State coach Kurt Russell hadn't seen him on a Caribbean scouting trip. He's the best defensive shortstop in the draft, an athletic 6-foot-1, 180-pounder with a cannon for an arm and plus actions and instincts. In fact, some teams might be more tempted to draft him as a pitcher, because he has run his fastball up to 95 mph and flashed a mid-80s slider in limited action. That decision became even more difficult when he missed a month with a broken toe, though he returned to help the Pioneers finish third at the Division II Junior College World Series. Simmons' righthanded swing is long, but he makes enough contact and has pop to go with his average speed. He might not provide a huge impact with his bat, but he should hit more than enough to make keeping his glove in the lineup worthwhile. Simmons is only a freshman, but he'll turn 21 in September and needs to start his pro career.

21 71 Minnesota Twins Niko Goodrum SS Fayette County HS, Fayetteville, Ga. Ga. $514,800
Goodrum is part of the deep class of Georgia prep players who are viewed as future outfielders, a list that includes Delino Deshields Jr., Chevez Clarke, Aaron Shipman and Chris Hawkins. Goodrum, like Hawkins, played shortstop in high school but probably will move out of the infield as a pro because he lacks the pure infield actions most scouts look for at short. He has excellent quickness and well-above-average arm strength and is a 60 runner on the 20-80 scale, though he should slow down as he bulks up. Goodrum was committed to Kennesaw State, and despite the Owls' recent track record of success, he is considered signable. Goodrum is a switch-hitter who got off to a slower start with the bat, thanks in part to him pressing on a modestly talented high school team. As the weather heated up, though, so did Goodrum's bat and he made more contact. He's long and lean at 6-foot-3, 175 pounds, and his swing has holes as a result of his long arms. He also has surprising raw power, as his swing has leverage and he has good hands. Scouts like Goodrum's makeup, and he's an easy player to dream on. He could wind up at third base, center field or even right and should go out in the first four rounds.
22 72 Texas Rangers Cody Buckel RHP Royal HS, Simi Valley, Calif. Calif. $590,000
Residing close to Hollywood, Buckel relishes a good dramatic flourish. He begins his pregame warm-up by standing on the grass between the mound and second base with the ball in his hand. He races up the backside of the mound, down the front, and fires the ball plateward. A fledgling singer and actor when he isn't striking out hitters, Buckel is undersized for a righthander at 6 feet, 170 pounds. He does flash a big man's fastball at 92-94 mph. Buckel mixes in an excellent array of secondary pitches, with a curveball, changeup and cutter. His pitching idol is Tim Lincecum, and while his stuff is not as electric as the Giants ace's, he still displays the potential for four average to plus deliveries. The primary concern is durability, as he usually loses 3-4 mph on his fastball as a game progresses. Committed to Pepperdine, Buckel projects as either a back-of-the-rotation starter or set-up man in professional baseball.
23 73 Florida Marlins Rob Rasmussen LHP UCLA Calif. $499,500
In his first collegiate start against UC Santa Barbara in 2008, Rasmussen got hit on the foot by a crackling line drive through the box. He continued to pitch, but later came out and discovered the foot was broken. That is the type of competitiveness scouts love in Rasmussen, a 5-foot-11, 170-pounder who was the only junior in UCLA's weekend rotation this year, behind sophomore flamethrowers Gerrit Cole and Trevor Bauer. Taken by the Dodgers in the 27th round of the 2007 draft, Rasmussen's draft stock for 2010 received an enormous boost with his 2009 summer performance, when he went 4-0, 1.80 in the Cape Cod League. He stumbled out of the gate in 2010 but rebounded to average 11.1 strikeouts per nine innings and a nearly 4-1 strikeout-walk ratio. Rasmussen's arsenal consists of four pitches: a 91-93 mph fastball, a slider, a changeup, and an old-fashioned, over-the-top, two-plane low-70s curve. His command difficulties can be traced to inconsistent mechanics and a tendency to rush his delivery. Despite his smaller frame, Rasmussen comfortably profiles as a back of the rotation starter or situational lefthander, where his breaking balls would be deadly.
24 74 San Francisco Giants Jarrett Parker OF Virginia Va. $700,000
Parker was a key player in Virginia's College World Series run in 2009, and he looked like a likely first-rounder with his body and track record. He slowed down by the time the Cavaliers arrived in Omaha, though, and he hit just .188 in the Cape Cod League. He got off to a slow start in 2010, and his stock continued to fall. His average dipped below .300 for some time, though he turned it on as the draft approached, raising his line to .322/.414/.574 with seven home runs in mid-May. At 6-foot-4, 210 pounds, Parker would be the final product if someone were asked to draw up the body of a major league outfielder with his long, lean frame. He's a good defender in center field with plus speed and an average arm. At the plate, Parker's strength and leverage give him good raw power. Against Duke this season he crushed a hanging changeup that one-hopped an office building in right field at Durham Bulls Athletic Park, which is also home of the Triple-A franchise. Parker's long arms do make him prone to a long swing and high strikeout numbers, and most scouts think he won't hit for a very high average. He would benefit from shortening up his swing and utilizing his speed more. Many hoped for a better season out of him and see him as a risky pick, but there's a lot of upside as well. He could go in the sandwich round, though it's possible that he could slide into the second round.
25 75 St. Louis Cardinals Jordan Swagerty RHP Arizona State Ariz. $625,000
Swagerty was a highly touted high school player out of Prestonwood Christian Academy in Plano, Texas. He was a 2007 Aflac All-American and a member of Team USA's junior national team. Now a draft-eligible sophomore, the 6-foot-1, 175-pound righthander has been dynamite at the back end of the Sun Devils' bullpen. His fastball sits in the 92-94 mph range and can get up to 96 when he's amped up. But, that's not his best pitch. Swagerty also throws a 84-86 mph curveball that grades out as a legit 70 on the 20-80 scale. It's a true 12-6 hammer. Swagerty's size concerns some scouts, but he can hold his velocity in back-to-back outings. He doesn't quite profile as a big league closer, but should move quickly to the big leagues and reminds scouts of Angels set-up man Scot Shields.
26 76 Colorado Rockies Chad Bettis RHP Texas Tech Texas $477,000
Bettis could join Brett Eibner as an unsigned Astros 2007 draft pick (eighth round) who blossoms into a first-rounder three years later. As with Eibner, there's debate about Bettis' future role. He's definitely a pitcher, and while many scouts see him as a rubber-armed reliever, others say he has enough stuff to start. Texas Tech has used him in both roles, deploying him as a starter as a freshman, a reliever a year ago and both ways this spring. A 6-foot-1, 211-pounder, Bettis has a quick arm, fluid delivery and quality fastball. He pitches in the low 90s as a starter and touched 98 mph coming out of the bullpen last summer with Team USA. He generates velocity with his fluid delivery and arm speed rather than effort. He still needs to do a better job of locating his fastball down in the strike zone, but he has thrown more strikes and shown more sink this year. Bettis' mid-80s slider can be a plus, but he also overthrows it at times. His changeup gives him an effective pitch against lefthanders. He sometimes relies on his secondary pitches too much, to the detriment of his fastball command.
27 77 Philadelphia Phillies Perci Garner RHP Ball State Ind. $470,700
Ball State produced a first-round pick (Bryan Bullington, No. 1 overall) and sandwich-rounder (Luke Hagerty) in the 2002 draft, and could repeat the feat again this year with Kolbrin Vitek and Garner. Garner joined the Cardinals on a football scholarship, but didn't see any game action in two years as a quarterback. After he emerged as the best pitching prospect in the Great Lakes League last summer, he gave up football, and he has continued to make strides this spring. Garner opened the season in Ball State's bullpen but moved into the rotation after shutting down a talented Louisville lineup for four innings in mid-March. He has a strong, athletic 6-foot-2, 225-pound frame and a pair of plus pitches in a lively 92-94 mph fastball that reaches 97 and a power curveball. He also throws a slider and a changeup. Garner's inexperience on the mound shows at times. His delivery can get slow and lack rhythm, and improving it would help his control. Though he's a draft-eligible sophomore, he's not considered a difficult sign.
28 78 Los Angeles Dodgers Ralston Cash RHP Lakeview Academy, Cornelia, Ga. Ga. $463,500
Ralston Cash, a Georgia signee, has overcome adversity in his life. His mother died in a car crash in 1995, when he was just 3, and he had his own car wreck in 2008. He's recovered to have some of the best velocity in the state, with a fastball that sits in the low 90s and has touched 94 mph. He also has a pro body at 6-foot-3, 200 pounds. Cash's secondary stuff strikes scouts as fringy.
29 79 Tampa Bay Rays Derek Dietrich 3B Georgia Tech Ga. $457,200
Dietrich is one of three unsigned 2007 Astros draft picks--Arkansas' Brett Eibner and Texas Tech's Chad Bettis are the others--who figure to go in the first two rounds this year. Dietrich was the highest pick, a third-rounder, and could still fall to that round despite having his best college season. He's a difficult player for scouts to judge because he doesn't fit an obvious pro profile. His lefthanded bat brings value, as do his strong arm and developing power, and he tied his career high with 14 homers this spring. He plays hard and has been a serviceable college shortstop defensively. Scouts believe he lacks the footwork or athletic ability in his 6-foot-1, 196-pound frame to stay at short, though, and wonder if his footwork can improve enough for him to play at second. Most doubt that and believe third base is his best fit with the glove, and he may not produce enough power to profile as a regular there. He also could prove to be a versatile big leaguer in the mold of Geoff Blum or Scott Spiezio, who both had the advantage of switch-hitting.
30 80 Toronto Blue Jays Justin Nicolino LHP University HS, Orlando Fla. $615,000
If teams considered him signable, lefthander Nicolino could factor into the first three rounds for some scouts. While it's hard to call Florida prep pitchers projectable because they throw year-round, Nicolino is just growing into his 6-foot-3 frame, having put on 15 pounds since last summer to get up to 175 pounds. Nicolino pitches off his fastball in the 88-91 mph range and has shown a curveball with average potential. His changeup is the better pitch now, and it's easy to see him as a three-pitch lefty with plus velocity down the line. It's also considered hard to buy Nicolino out of a Virginia commitment when scouts have to project on the velocity. A strong showing at the state all-star games in Sebring, though, could prod a team to pop Nicolino.
31 81 Los Angeles Angels Daniel Tillman RHP Florida Southern Fla. $443,700
Florida Southern has had back-to-back seasons with a high-profile prospect who thrived in the Cape Cod League the previous summer. Robbie Shields didn't live up to billing last season, though the Mets still popped him in the third round. This year, Tillman figures to go in the same range as he has continued to rack up strikeouts in the nation's best Division II conference. He put up 22 scoreless innings on the Cape for Cotuit last summer and has had consistent stuff this spring. Tillman has a quick arm on his 6-foot-1, 200-pound body, and he consistently sits in the 90-94 mph range, touching 96. He complements it with a quick, hard slider, giving him two plus pitches. Tillman's mound presence gives him an extra edge and he has a closer's mentality. He'll have to hone his command to get a chance to close at the big league level but should have the stuff to reach the majors as a set-up man, going out as early as the third round.
32 82 New York Yankees Angelo Gumbs OF Torrance (Calif.) HS Calif. $750,000
Gumbs wears No. 21 in tribute to his idol, Roberto Clemente, and plays with the same energy and abandon, slashing at the ball, diving into bags, cutting loose with powerful throws and making spectacular plays in the field. Gumbs also hails from a school with a strong baseball legacy, and its major league alumni include the father-son tandem of Fred and Jason Kendall. Gumbs has spent most of his high school career at shortstop, but the 6-foot, 200-pounder's future is in the outfield. His tools are impressive but not overwhelming. His 60-yard dash times were in the 6.75-6.85-second range in showcases last summer, and he zips down the line in about 4.15 seconds from the right side of the plate. His windmill delivery produces strong throws, and he has often made breathtaking catches on the scout ball and showcase circuit. At bat, Gumbs has improved immensely over the past year, working under the tutelage of professional coaches at MLB's Urban Youth Academy in Compton, and he has terrific bat speed. He got off to a blazing start this spring, only to be slowed in late April by a sore right elbow and flu symptoms, which reduced him to DH duty. He has struggled with offspeed stuff and breaking pitches, and battles a tendency to pull off the ball. Gumbs has the ability to be an electrifying outfielder with five average to plus tools. He's just 17, and the club that drafts him will need to be patient as he develops, but Gumbs could provide an enormous payoff.