Round

Players signed indicated in Bold

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 33 Houston Astros Mike Kvasnicka 3B/C Minnesota Minn. $936,000
After catching sparingly in his first two seasons at Minnesota, Kvasnicka has seen semi-regular action behind the plate this spring while senior Kyle Knudson has recovered from offseason labrum surgery on both hips. Kvasnicka already was an attractive draft prospect as a 6-foot-2, 210-pound switch-hitter with a balanced stroke, good power potential and strike-zone discipline. Now his stock has jumped with the possibility that he could be a catcher rather than a right fielder. He has solid arm strength and accuracy, and he has the athleticism, hands and work ethic to become an average receiver. While he might have been a fourth-round pick as an outfielder, he now figures to go in the first two rounds as a catcher. If he winds up moving back to the outfield, he still has enough bat to reach the big leagues. Kvasnicka's father Jay was a Twins eighth-round pick in 1988--Minnesota drafted Mike in the 31st round out of high school--and reached Triple-A.
2 34 Toronto Blue Jays Aaron Sanchez RHP Barstow (Calif.) HS Calif. $775,000
Sanchez has lured scouts to Barstow, stuck in the middle of the California desert halfway between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. Only one player--Royals righty Matt Mitchell, a 2007 14th-round pick--has been drafted out of Barstow in the last 20 years. Sanchez, an angular and projectable Oregon recruit, should change that. He first drew the attention of scouts (and comparisons to Orel Hershiser) during last summer's showcase season, when he starred in the Area Code Games and the Aflac game. Utilizing an easy, mid-three-quarters arm action, Sanchez flashes a 91-93 mph fastball and adds a crisp curve. Mechanically advanced, Sanchez uses his legs well in his pitching delivery, avoids flying his front shoulder open and finishes strongly while creating a decent downward plane. As he progresses, the 6-foot-3, 175-pounder will need to develop more movement on his fastball, which is now too straight. His command is negatively affected by variances in his arm slot, and Sanchez will need to add at least a pitch and potentially two to his current arsenal. Sanchez profiles as a No. 3 starter. He may take some time to reach the majors, but his tantalizing upside is difficult for any organization to ignore.
3 35 Atlanta Braves Matt Lipka SS McKinney (Texas) HS Texas $800,000
McKinney quarterback/righthander Zach Lee may continue to play two sports at Louisiana State, but his top wide receiver will focus on baseball, either in pro ball or at Alabama. A two-time 4-A all-state wide receiver in Texas, Lipka caught 22 touchdown passes from Lee last fall. He's one of the fastest prospects in the draft, capable of running the 60-yard dash in 6.4 seconds. He's a quick-twitch athlete with strength in his 6-foot-1, 190-pound frame. A righthanded hitter, he has strong hands and bat speed, though he gets jammed more than he should. He employs a line-drive stroke but has a chance for at least average power. Lipka has the athleticism and arm strength to play shortstop, but his hands and actions are questionable. He'll get the opportunity to play shortstop as a pro, and he also profiles well as a center fielder. While Lee is considered one of the draft's most unsignable players, Lipka should sign if he goes in the first three rounds as expected.
4 36 Boston Red Sox Bryce Brentz OF Middle Tennessee State Tenn. $889,200
Drafted as a pitcher out of high school by the Indians in the 30th round, Brentz was known more for a fastball that reached 92 mph. He was in the weekend rotation as a sophomore but made much more noise at the plate, leading Division I in batting at .465 as well as in home runs (28) and slugging (.930). Brentz followed up by hitting .366 for Team USA and moved to center field as a junior, but he hasn't had the encore season he or scouts hoped for, despite giving up pitching. Brentz got off to a bit of a slow start, then missed three weeks with a hairline fracture of his right ankle. He moved to right field after returning from the injury and profiles better there anyway. His arm hasn't quite bounced back to what it was in high school; once above-average, it's now more solid average. Brentz's all-or-nothing approach at the plate makes him streaky, but he has explosive power, and even in a difficult year he was slugging close to .700. The salutatorian at his high school, Brentz is bright, plays hard and is what he is, a feast-or-famine slugger who fits the right-field profile. He shouldn't last past the first round.
5 37 Los Angeles Angels Taylor Lindsey SS Desert Mountain HS, Scottsdale, Ariz. Ariz. $873,000
Lindsey has been a hot name in Arizona, but the tools and profile haven't matched the hype. He will not be a pro shortstop, as he has a thick lower half and is a below-average runner with a below-average arm. He might be able to move to second base or more likely left field. While he has a nice lefthanded swing, his power is average at best and one scout said it was a metal-bat swing that won't translate to wood. Lindsey is committed to Arizona State. Late rumors said at least one team liked Lindsey enough to take him in the supplemental first round. While that team is an outlier, one team is all it takes.
6 38 Toronto Blue Jays Noah Syndergaard RHP Legacy HS, Mansfield, Texas Texas $600,000
Syndergaard had as much helium as any Texas high schooler leading up to the draft. He led Legacy High into the 4-A regional semifinals by two-hitting Trimble Tech (Fort Worth) in the first round, striking out 10 and hitting a grand slam against Lake Dallas in the second round, and striking out 15 against Birdville in the quarterfinals. He was even better in the semis, coming within one out of a no-hitter and striking out 14 against Frenship (Wolfforth). Syndergaard has an athletic 6-foot-4, 195-pound frame, and was dealing 90-94 mph fastballs in the postseason. His curveball also was much improved, and there's talk that the Dallas Baptist recruit suddenly could sneak into the sandwich round with the right club.
7 39 Boston Red Sox Anthony Ranaudo RHP Louisiana State La. $2,550,000
After winning the championship game of the College World Series last year and ranking third in strikeouts (159 in 124 innings) and fifth in wins (12) as a sophomore, Ranaudo was the top college prospect and No. 2 overall when 2010 started. But scouts haven't been sure what to make of him since he came down with a stress reaction in his elbow following his first start in February. He missed a month and has battled his mechanics and command since returning. When he's right, he uses his 6-foot-7, 230-pound frame to leverage a 91-94 mph fastball down in the zone and to both sides of the plate, and he backs up his heater with a plus curveball and solid changeup. But that Ranaudo hasn't been seen this spring. He still has a low-90s fastball, but his delivery has fallen out of sync. His arm action is flatter, preventing him from staying on top of his pitches, causing them to flatten out and rise up in the strike zone. Ranaudo also missed the first two months and worked just 12 innings in his freshman season because of a bout with elbow tendinitis. His medical history, inconsistent spring and choice of adviser (Boras Corp.) could cause him to slide deep in the first round unless he suddenly regains his 2009 form. He generated momentum by performing better during the Southeastern Conference tournament and an NCAA regional start against UCLA, but his fate remained uncertain.
8 40 Los Angeles Angels Ryan Bolden OF Madison (Miss.) Central HS Miss. $829,800
Mississippi has produced plenty of raw, toolsy outfielders over the years, with recent examples including Wendell Fairley (Giants, first round, 2007), Justin Reed (Reds, fourth round, 2006) and Bill Hall (Brewers, sixth round, 1998). Hall is the last Mississippi high school signee to reach the major leagues for more than a cup of coffee. Bolden has excellent size at 6-foot-2, 195 pounds, and big tools to go with his athletic body. He's a 65 or 70 runner on the 20-80 scale, and his strength gives him above-average raw power. He is raw in all phases of the game. He has bat speed and hitting ability—he's unusual as he bats right but throws left—but hit at the bottom of the order as a junior, when Madison Central won a state title, and still swings and misses a lot as a senior. Scouts question his pitch recognition and ability to hit breaking balls. While he has played center field, Bolden also logged time in right because of his inability to get good reads in center. He profiles better in center field due to his fringe-average arm. While Bolden is an Ole Miss recruit, most clubs considered him signable, and he fits the mold for teams that love pure athletes, such as the Phillies, Rays and Marlins. He also would be a better risk for a club with multiple selections.
9 41 Toronto Blue Jays Asher Wojciechowski RHP The Citadel S.C. $815,400
Wojciechowski grew up in Michigan but moved to South Carolina during high school with his family, in part for the strong college baseball. He wound up at The Citadel and has been a weekend staple for three seasons, earning a spot on USA Baseball's college national team last summer. Noted mostly for his 6-foot-4, 230-pound frame and above-average hard slider previously, Wojciechowski worked off the fastball more last summer with Team USA at the urging of Elon coach Mike Kennedy, who was Team USA's pitching coach. Wojciechowski took the advice to heart and has thrown harder as a result of throwing more fastballs and honing his mechanics. After throwing 89-92 mph last year, Wojciechowski has shown one of college baseball's best heaters this season, sitting 93-96 in numerous starts and reaching 96 in the eighth inning in at least two starts. Wojciechowski's slider is still a plus pitch, but he needs work on his rudimentary changeup. He has good control of his fastball and the durable frame to project as a mid-rotation innings-eater.
10 42 Tampa Bay Rays Drew Vettleson OF Central Kitsap HS, Silverdale, Wash. Wash. $845,000
Vettleson has generated more publicity for being a rare switch-pitcher, but he's a pro prospect as an outfielder. He sits at 88-90 mph from the right side with a good curveball, but he's a better hitter—which says a lot. Vettleson has a quiet approach in the box and he's patient with good pitch recognition. His hand positioning is unique, as he starts with his hands letter-high and deep behind his rear leg. It's a simple swing and he's short to the ball, but it also causes stiffness in his lead arm, which could cause problems when he faces better velocity. It worked for him on the showcase circuit, as he was on fire against some of the country's best pitchers all summer. His swing is smooth and scouts believe he'll make adjustments to hit for average and power. He profiles as a corner outfielder with below-average speed, but has great instincts and makeup. Vettleson hasn't played against great high school competition and has been hard to see, as he's typically pitching, playing shortstop or playing center field lefthanded. Where he ends up going in the draft will likely hinge on how he does in predraft workouts.
11 43 Seattle Mariners Taijuan Walker RHP Yucaipa (Calif.) HS Calif. $800,000
The 6-foot-5, 200-pound Walker doubles as an elite basketball player, averaging 21 points and 15 rebounds per game as a forward last season. He has great leaping ability, and his dunks on the court have made him into a local folk hero. As a junior, Walker pitched little but did play shortstop next to Diamondbacks supplemental first-rounder Matt Davidson, a third baseman. Obviously uncomfortable and ill-suited for the infield, Walker has since concentrated on pitching. Walker was terrific in a stint for the Angels Elite scout team in the fall of 2009, but since then he has been more erratic. His outings in the early part of this season were rocky, probably due to the transition from basketball to baseball. In later starts, Walker would start strongly and then struggle as a game went on. When right, Walker fires a 91-93 mph fastball that can touch 95, and adds a slider and curve. His whippy three-quarters arm action can be free and easy on some occasions, restricted and stiff on others. Scouts agree that Walker, who hasn't committed to a college yet, is a long-range project as a pitcher, but his combination of sparkling athletic ability, raw stuff and imposing build may make Walker a gamble worth taking.
12 44 Detroit Tigers Nick Castellanos 3B Archbishop McCarthy HS, Southwest Ranches, Fla. Fla. $3,450,000
Castellanos was already a prospect before last year's Under Armour game at Wrigley Field in Chicago. Then he hit four doubles on national television against good competition, and suddenly Castellanos was a "famous guy," a term scouts use for heavily scouted players. He also hit .327 for the 18U USA Baseball team that won a gold medal at the Pan American Junior Championship in Venezuela. He has more than held up under the scrutiny, and in fact has thrived in it, having a stellar senior season. A shortstop in high school, Castellanos projects to move to third as a pro and has the agility and arm strength to play the hot corner. He also should have the bat. He's one of the better hitters in the prep class, thanks to a strong swing featuring good extension and natural loft. He has used the whole field more this year and is a solid athlete with good aptitude. Some scouts question his ability to hit breaking balls, saying they've seen too much swing-and-miss this year to project him as a plus hitter, and have more confidence in his future power. Others debate whether Castellanos has true impact tools or is closer to solid-average. He is an average runner and doesn't have a glaring weakness.
13 45 Texas Rangers Luke Jackson RHP Calvary Christian HS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Fla. $1,545,000
Jackson didn't start pitching seriously until his freshman year in high school, and he immediately showed aptitude and a live arm. By his junior season, he earned a spot in the Area Code Games. He's athletic and has a quick arm, rivaling bigger-name Florida prep pitchers Karsten Whitson and A.J. Cole in terms of pure velocity. Several scouts have seen Jackson's fastball hit 95-96 mph, and he usually sits in the 90-94 range, a significant jump after sitting 87-91 as a junior. The Miami recruit has room to grow on his 6-foot-2, 170-pound frame, and he'll need to get bigger and stronger to harness his quick arm, improve his durability and maintain his mechanics. Jackson has a bit of effort to his delivery and had inconsistent command as the season wore on. His changeup and curveball, while flashing potential, rate as below-average pitches now. Scouts use words like "electric" to describe Jackson's stuff and athletic ability, and at his best he's not far from his peers in the Sunshine State who were expected to go out in the first round. His inconsistency pushes him down draft boards, and his signability will ultimately determine how far down.
14 46 St. Louis Cardinals Seth Blair RHP Arizona State Ariz. $751,500
A Top 200 draft prospect out of Rock Falls (Ill.) High in 2007, signability caused Blair to drop to the 47th round and he headed west to Arizona State. He always had good stuff, and his results have taken a step forward every year there. He came into the season expecting to be Arizona State's Saturday starter, but was thrust into the Friday night lights when lefthander Josh Spence was shut down all season. He stepped up nicely, helping the Sun Devils get off to a 24-0 start and rank among the nation's top teams all season. Blair showed electric stuff earlier in the season, sitting 93-95 mph and even touching 97. He tailed off a little as the year went on, but he still pitches at 92-94. It's a heavy fastball with riding life and some sink when it's down in the zone, although it can flatten out later in games. His curveball is an average pitch now with a chance to be plus. He has a good changeup and a cutter that he uses occasionally. A long arm action in the back and some pulling off to his glove side cause him to have average command. His walk rate is down this year, but he still hits a batter nearly every game and runs up a high pitch count that causes him to leave games earlier than teams would like to see out of top pitchers. Blair is a Boras Corp. client, but teams don't consider him a particularly tough sign.
15 47 Colorado Rockies Peter Tago RHP Dana Hills HS, Dana Point, Calif. Calif. $982,500
Tago epitomizes Southern California cool. Oblivious to outside distractions, he calmly ambles off the team bus decked out in a hooded sweatshirt and wraparound shades with his iPod earphones firmly in place. He also worries little about high school hitters, whom he routinely dominates. His lanky 6-foot-3, 180-pound frame is ideally projectable, and Tago delivers the ball with an easy, relaxed throwing motion that is almost poetic. Tago, who switched his college commitment from UCLA to Cal State Fullerton in May, fires a 91-93 mph fastball, and his arm action and build indicate more velocity in the future. His curve exhibits nice shape and two-plane movement, but Tago will need to tighten the spin on that pitch. He can better incorporate his lower half into his delivery and clean up his arm stroke as well. He'll also need to develop a third pitch, such as a changeup. An Aflac and Area Codes alumnus, Tago provides a near perfect model of a prep righthander with a huge upside: projectable frame, easy arm action, calm demeanor and electric stuff.
16 48 Detroit Tigers Chance Ruffin RHP Texas Texas $1,150,000
En route to a 12-year big league career, Ruffin's father Bruce was a second-round draft pick out of Texas in 1985. His son could match or exceed that draft status after moving full-time to the bullpen this spring. Ruffin's stuff has played up after the change in roles, with his fastball jumping from 89-91 mph to 90-93, topping out at 95 when he's fresh. His 78-82 mph slider is his best pitch, and he has a late-breaking curveball that he uses to get backdoor strikes against lefthanders. He'll also mix in a changeup, though it's really more of a batting-practice fastball. His regular-season numbers--0.77 ERA (the best in NCAA Division I), 13 saves, .176 opponent average, 89-18 K-BB ratio--were as dazzling as any in college baseball. He's similar to former Longhorns closer Huston Street in terms of size, arsenal and competitive makeup. The biggest drawback with Ruffin is his size (6-foot-1, 185 pounds), but nevertheless some scouts think he could make it in pro ball as a starter. More likely, he'll be fast-tracked as a reliever.
17 49 Texas Rangers Mike Olt 3B Connecticut Conn. $717,300
Olt followed his older brother Brad to UConn and made an immediate impact as the starting shortstop as a freshman, hitting 13 home runs and setting a school record with 61 RBIs. He ranked as the No. 1 prospect in the New England Collegiate League that summer but was hampered by a sprained ankle in 2009, when he also missed 22 games after being hit on the wrist by a pitch. Olt moved to third base as a sophomore, and his soft hands, smooth actions and strong arm will make him at least a solid-average defender there, and some scouts believe he has Gold Glove potential. He got off to a slow start offensively this spring, struggling against pitches on the outer half and breaking balls, but midway through the season he went to a narrower stance and worked to shorten up his swing. The adjustment paid off, and he was hitting .342/.407/.668 with 16 homers and 59 RBIs. The 6-foot-2, 210-pound Olt has good leverage in his swing and above-average raw power, but his swing has holes and scouts still question his pitch recognition. His work ethic garners rave reviews, giving reason to hope he can become an average major league hitter. He's also a good athlete with fringe-average speed. Olt's stock was on the rise down the stretch, and he could be drafted as high as the second round.
18 50 St. Louis Cardinals Tyrell Jenkins RHP Henderson (Texas) HS Texas $1,300,000
Jenkins may be the most athletic pitcher in the draft. Baylor's top quarterback recruit, he also lettered in basketball and ran a 49-second quarter-mile in a relay race this spring—without any training. The next day, he was throwing 92-93 mph fastballs in the seventh inning. Jenkins has a loose, quick, whippy arm that can deliver fastballs up to 95 mph. There's a lot of projection remaining in his 6-foot-4, 180-pound frame, and lots of room for improvement with his secondary pitches. He can spin a curveball and also throws a slider and changeup. He should develop more consistency once he focuses on baseball and does a better job of repeating his delivery. He's raw but has tremendous upside, making him a perfect fit in the sandwich round for teams with multiple picks. Jenkins is considered much more signable than fellow Texas high school pitcher/quarterback Zach Lee.