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Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player School State Bonus
2 54 Kansas City Royals Brett Eibner Arkansas Ark. $1,250,000
Eibner is the best two-way prospect in the 2010 draft. Teams are evenly split about whether he has more potential as a pitcher or an outfielder. A fourth-round pick out of high school by the Astros, he has impressive power in his arm and bat. He has added significant polish as both a pitcher and a hitter this spring, making the decision about his future no easier. After not pitching during the fall while recovering from a mild elbow strain sustained in the Cape Cod League, he has refined his command and secondary pitches. His fastball velocity can be inconsistent, as he'll sit at 88-91 mph during some games and 92-94 in others, peaking at 97. His mid-80s slider/cutter is a plus pitch at times, and he has improved his feel for a changeup. The 6-foot-4, 210-pounder has a loose delivery that he repeats well. Eibner also has considerable upside as a power hitter. He can crush the ball to all fields, and he has done a better job this year of recognizing pitches and using the opposite field. Though he's strictly a righthanded hitter in games, he wowed Cape observers with a lefty batting-practice display last summer. His arm is an asset in the outfield, and while his solid speed and athleticism give him a chance to stick in center field at the next level, he projects more as a right fielder. Eibner's preference is to hit, but it remains to be seen if he'll get his wish. He didn't hurt his cause by hitting three homers in the Razorbacks' regional opener against Grambling State, his first game back after missing the Southeastern Conference tournament with a hairline fracture in his right hand.
18 550 Chicago Cubs Brooks Pinckard Baylor Texas
Pinckard is one of the faster runners available in the 2010 draft, with plus-plus speed that plays well in center field. However, he probably won't get a chance to use his wheels in pro ball. Scouts view him as a slap hitter and are much more intrigued by his strong right arm, which produces fastballs clocked up to 95 mph and loaded with sink. He's a work in progress on the mound, after redshirting in 2008 because he wasn't ready for Big 12 Conference baseball, then pitching just 49 innings while pulling two-way duty the last two seasons. He doesn't have a great feel for pitching yet, and his fastball isn't a strikeout pitch despite its velocity and life. His high-70s slider is inconsistent, and while his funky delivery adds deception, it also restricts his control and command. The 6-foot-1, 195-pounder is a quality athlete who could take off once he focuses on pitching—like another former Bears outfielder/pitcher, Aaron Miller, has since signing with the Dodgers as a sandwich pick last summer. Whether Pinckard will be signable if he goes around the fifth round as a draft-eligible sophomore remains to be seen. A stress fracture in his lower leg kept him out of the lineup for three weeks at midseason, but he was healthy again by the end of the regular season.