Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
2 77 Boston Red Sox Alex Wilson RHP Texas $470,700
Wilson projected as a possible first-round pick before he blew out his elbow in the Cape Cod League in the summer of 2007, shortly before he transferred from Winthrop to Texas A&M. He redshirted with the Aggies last spring, though he did reach 94 mph in bullpen workouts that attracted a number of scouts. The Cubs took a flier on him in the 10th round last June and followed him when he returned to the Cape in the summer. Chicago reportedly offered him $600,000 to sign but he was looking for $1.5 million. Wilson looked to be in line for that kind of bonus when he opened this season with a 91-95 mph fastball and a true slider, but his stuff slacked off later in the spring and didn't pick up when Texas A&M moved him to the bullpen. By May, his fastball had flattened out and was down to 88-91 mph and his breaking ball had become slurvy. In his final chance to impress scouts, he got pounded by Oregon State in the opening round of the NCAA Division I regionals. Wilson is mainly a two-pitch pitcher, so he projects as a reliever in pro ball. His control has been sharp (105-18 K-BB ratio in 75 innings) for a pitcher in his first season back after elbow reconstruction. He figures to be a second-round pick at this point, though he's believed to be looking for a seven-figure bonus as a 22-year-old junior.
6 200 Chicago Cubs Brooks Raley LHP Texas $750,000
Raley was the best two-way player in college baseball in the first half of the season before dropping off down the stretch. The consensus is that he's better on the mound, where he has command of a diverse array of pitches. He works mainly with an 87-90 mph sinker, a slider and a changeup, and he also has a four-seam fastball that peaks at 93 mph and a curveball. Scouts respect his ability to compete and to command all of his offering, but he doesn't have a true out pitch, which will leave him with little margin for error in pro ball. Though Raley has a clean delivery, they also wonder how well he'll hold up at a wiry 6-foot-3 and 185 pounds. He also has potential as a lefthanded-hitting outfielder, though a second-half slump has led to some questions about his bat. He does offer plus-plus speed, a good eye and gap power as a hitter, as well as above-average range and arm strength. Raley plays the outfield corners for Texas A&M, in part to reduce the physical burden of playing both ways, but definitely is capable of playing center field as a pro. A sophomore-eligible, he could be a second- or third-round pick. But he's spooking clubs by not giving them any inkling as to his asking price, so he could last much longer in the draft than his talent would dictate.
12 373 Chicago White Sox Kyle Colligan OF Texas
32 957 San Francisco Giants Luke Anders 1B Texas
34 1031 Houston Astros Scott Migl RHP Texas
37 1127 Philadelphia Phillies Brodie Greene 2B Texas
Brodie Greene showed his toughness when he missed just a week of action after getting beaned in mid-March, despite needing 10 stitches and multiple root canals to save several of his teeth. He batted .257 before getting hurt, then .384 the rest of the way. A converted outfielder, Greene may have the best all-around tools of the state's college second-base prospects. A 6-foot-1, 195-pound switch-hitter with plus speed, he'll have to learn to draw more walks and better cope with breaking pitches to bat atop a pro lineup. His range and arm are solid for second base.