Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1s 39 Milwaukee Brewers Kentrail Davis OF Tenn. $1,200,000
An All-Freshman choice in 2008 who starred for Team USA, Davis is a sophomore-eligible who doesn't neatly fit any mold. His performance suffered this spring on a Tennessee team having a down season, and he had struck out in 25 percent of his at-bats in two college seasons. However, he has tools and hitting ability that stand out in the 2009 draft class. Strong and physical at 5-foot-9, 200 pounds, Davis has a short, powerful swing when he's going well, with bat speed to spare. Despite that, Davis had a tendency to chase pitches this year when pitched around, and he got pull happy, which caused his swing to get a little long. Similarly, Davis has plus speed as a 6.6 runner over 60 yards, but it doesn't play plus offensively. Davis is an average defender in center field, which is below what most big league teams look for. If he can't stay in center, his fringy arm will push him to left, where his power will have to play.
3 102 Chicago White Sox Bryan Morgado LHP Tenn.
A prominent recruit out of the Miami area, Morgado missed his freshman season after having had Tommy John surgery on Oct. 9, 2006. As he redshirted, coach Rod Delmonico, who recruited him (and several other Miami area players over the years) was fired. But Morgado stuck it out and stayed at Tennessee. Coming back from the surgery, Morgado struggled working as a starter and eventually moved to the bullpen. There Morgado's arm strength played up, though he still didn't dominate. His fastball, a 90-93 mph pitch as a starter, sat in the 92-95 range from the bullpen, and he ran it up to 97 against Louisiana State. He lacked the fastball command or even control to be pitch efficient and go deep into games as a starter, but his fastball control improved in short relief. Morgado's offspeed stuff, fringe-average with fringy control as a starter, played up out of the pen as well, as he threw more strikes with his power slider, an average pitch. He tends to pitch off emotion and needs to mature in that regard if he's to be anything more than a setup man as a pro. An eligible sophomore, Morgado was expected to be a reasonably easy sign as the Volunteers program looks to clean house after a miserable season.
12 377 Philadelphia Phillies Nick Hernandez LHP Tenn. $125,000
More was expected of several Tennessee pitchers, starting with lefthander Nick Hernandez, whose father Nicolas was the eighth overall pick in the 1978 draft as a catcher. He's also the nephew of major league umpire Angel Hernandez. The 6-foot-4, 205-pound Hernandez was a potential top 100 pick entering the spring after he led the Cape Cod League with six wins and 57 innings last summer. He showed tremendous control as a sophomore, walking just nine in 84 innings. His walk rate increased this year, and when he caught the plate it was the fat part too frequently. Opponents hit .317 off him with 38 extra-base hits this spring. The velocity on his 88-91 mph fastball fluctuated all year, which made his plus changeup less effective. Hernandez's curveball is below-average, and he'll have to improve that to be a starter long-term in pro ball. He pitched better down the stretch, going at least six innings in each of his final six starts, and could still go in the first six rounds.
19 568 Atlanta Braves Ty'Relle Harris RHP Tenn.
Other Vols pitchers didn't even fare as well but still should be drafted. Righthanders Ty'Relle Harris, Stephen McCray and Aaron Tullo all took turns in the weekend rotation. Harris competes well but has less stuff than his teammates, sitting at 88-92 mph with his fastball, complemented with a solid upper-70s slider.
35 1063 Chicago White Sox Danny Wiltz RHP Tenn.