Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
9 265 Pittsburgh Pirates Brock Holt 2B Texas $125,000
A shortstop at Navarro (Texas) JC, Brock Holt moved to second base after transferring to Rice in deference to Rick Hague, a top 2010 draft prospect. He made a seamless transition to his new position and to batting leadoff for the Owls, hitting for average, controlling the strike zone and offering gap power from the left side of the plate. He's an average runner with the instincts to steal a few bases. A 5-foot-10, 170-pound scrapper, Holt has enough arm and range to tempt a pro team into giving him another shot at shortstop.
9 266 Baltimore Orioles Ryan Berry RHP Texas $417,600
Berry doesn't have Stephen Strasburg's stuff, but he was the second-best pitcher in college baseball before he got hurt in mid-March. In consecutive complete-game wins over Texas A&M, Notre Dame and San Diego, he allowed just five hits, an unearned run and no walks while striking out 28. Then he strained a muscle beneath his pitching shoulder in his next start, which sidelined him for five weeks. The Owls eased him back slowly into the rotation and he looked like his early-season self in the Conference USA tournament, firing a two-hitter against Alabama-Birmingham. Two days later, he pitched the ninth inning to save the championship game. In the NCAA Division I regionals, he threw 126 pitches in a loss to Kansas State's A.J. Morris--his teammate at Humble (Texas) High--and pitched the final two innings of the clincher against the Wildcats on one day's rest. Berry's lone plus pitch is his knuckle-curve, yet he took a step forward this spring when he stopped relying on it so much. He has done a better job of throwing his 88-91 mph fastball to both sides of the plate to set up his curve, and he also mixes in a slider and changeup. His fastball has good life and touches 93 at times. He's not physical at 6-foot-1 and 195 pounds, but he does a good job of repeating his delivery and throwing strikes. His mechanics bother some scouts, as he lands stiff and upright, putting stress on his arm. While Berry's resurgence has him moving back up draft boards, it remains to be seen whether a club will take him high enough (top two rounds) to sign him. Before he was sidelined, teams already were leery of the health of Rice pitchers. Six of the eight Owls pitchers drafted in the first or supplemental first round this decade (Kenny Baugh, Jon Skaggs, Philip Humber, Jeff Niemann, Wade Townsend, Joe Savery) have had elbow or shoulder surgery in college or early in their pro careers.
31 927 San Francisco Giants Diego Seastrunk C Texas
34 1036 Milwaukee Brewers Mike Ojala RHP Texas
Despite pitching with a torn ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow, Rice righthander Mike Ojala won games in the Conference USA tournament and the NCAA Division I regionals. He'll eventually need Tommy John surgery but decided to keep pitching until he couldn't any longer. Before he got hurt, Ojala had a chance to go in the fourth or fifth round. The 6-foot-3, 195-pounder had an 88-92 mph fastball, a hard curveball and good changeup. His elbow also bothered him last summer, when he helped the Santa Barbara Foresters win the NBC World Series.
41 1246 Milwaukee Brewers Steven Sultzbaugh OF Texas