Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1 31 Chicago Cubs Brett Jackson OF Calif. $972,000
Jackson is most frequently compared with J.D. Drew, at least physically. But while critics often question Drew's passion, the same accusation could never be directed at Jackson. Strong and muscular, Jackson is a wonderful athlete who is a perpetual motion machine on the field and plays with flair. He is an enthusiastic, upbeat and supportive teammate, and he's an aggressive baserunner who challenges outfielders and takes the extra base, often diving in headfirst while doing so. He uses his above-average speed to chase down drives in the gaps in center field, and he has the range to flag down balls hit in front of him or over his head. His arm can be inconsistent, but he has enough arm strength for both left and center. Most criticism surrounding Jackson centers on his hitting, where he's not nearly as polished as Drew. He utilizes an inward-turning, hand-pumping, leg-kicking, load-up-and-let-it-fly swing. He has excellent bat speed and shows the ability to rifle the ball around the diamond, with acceptable home run power, particularly for a leadoff man. His high strikeout totals hurt his draft chances, though, and he had 58 whiffs in 206 at-bats this season.
2 50 Washington Nationals Jeff Kobernus 2B Calif. $705,500
Kobernus is one of the most versatile players in the nation. His athletic and still projectable 6-foot-2, 195-pound frame fits almost anywhere on the diamond, and indeed he has played several positions during his career at Cal. He played second base this season, overcoming a sluggish start to bat .351/.385/.563 with eight home runs in a disappointing season for the Golden Bears. With above average speed, Kobernus stole 17 bases this spring, giving him 41 for his career. Defensively, Kobernus displays fine range, with excellent hands and playmaking ability. He will make careless errors, as with many young infielders, but his arm and glove grade out to solid-average. Primarily a line drive hitter, Kobernus shows an advanced approach, utilizing the entire field and intelligently looking to go with the pitch when needed. He will flash occasional power, but his forte is gap-to-gap line drives. While Kobernus does not have overwhelming tools in any one area, he is an athletic and well-rounded player who has the potential to fill any number of roles as a professional. Look for the organization that drafts him to start him out as a second baseman, with a move to third possible if he fills out his frame more.
2 56 Los Angeles Dodgers Blake Smith OF Calif. $643,500
California's lefthanded-hitting, righty-pitching Smith perplexed scouts all spring. At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, he has premium size to go with athleticism. He had emerged as a premium prospect last summer with USA Baseball's college national team, when he hit .327 with three homers (second on the team) while also throwing nine scoreless innings, striking out 11. Smith flashes terrific stuff on the mound but struggled in getting hitters out. After early-season difficulties on the mound he has rarely pitched since, finally being relegated only to a DH role by a lat muscle strain. As a pitcher, Smith fires a 92-94 mph fastball, which exhibits fine arm side movement but is straight to his glove side. His 82-84 mph changeup resembles an old-fashioned palm ball, and that pitch shows both arm side movement and "drop dead" action. Unfortunately for Smith, he has poor command and control and gets behind hitters too often. A pitcher with his quality of stuff should not get hit as hard or as frequently as he did this year, when he walked 20 in 20 innings. As an outfielder, Smith has a well above-average right fielder's arm, and his long, sweeping lefthanded swing produces provocative home run power. However, the length and severe uppercut path of his swing may produce holes that professional pitchers can exploit. Observers who saw him regularly with Team USA last summer believe Smith might be better suited for the everyday player role than working on the mound, and see him as fitting the right-field profile perfectly if his bat emerges. However, plenty of scouts believe in Smith's future as a short stint relief man. To be successful in that venture, Smith must greatly improve his command. No one doubts he has the raw stuff to succeed in a middle relief capacity, but he may make it as a hitter as well.
15 468 Boston Red Sox Michael Bugary LHP Calif.
24 728 Florida Marlins Mike Brady SS Calif.
36 1074 San Diego Padres Dylan Tonneson C Calif.
49 1465 Pittsburgh Pirates Yasser Clor RHP Calif.