Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
1s 36 Los Angeles Dodgers Aaron Miller LHP Texas $889,200
Baylor was supposed to have one of college baseball's best rotations, and instead it has been the biggest disappointment. Kendal Volz, a projected early first-rounder when the season opened, has seen his stuff regress. A pair of possible second-rounders, Shawn Tolleson (elbow issues) and Craig Fritsch (command woes and a lack of mental toughness), fared even worse, and the trio combined for just eight wins this season. Though he faded down the stretch, Miller was the Bears' best pitcher for much of the spring and pitched himself into the top two rounds in the process. Though he hadn't pitched regularly since high school, Miller repeatedly showed a 91-94 mph fastball and a nasty 82-83 mph slider. His command is spotty, but the 6-foot-3, 200-pounder has the athleticism to improve with more experience. Miller first emerged as a top pitching prospect when he threw 90-91 mph as a high school sophomore, but by his senior year he was more highly regarded as a right fielder in the mold of Paul O'Neill. Miller didn't want to pitch as a freshman for Baylor and made just six mound appearances in 2008. He still started in right field for the Bears when he wasn't pitching, and hit .310 while ranking second on the club with 12 homers and 47 RBIs. But it's clear now that his future will be on the mound.
6 173 Seattle Mariners Shaver Hansen 3B Texas $150,000
Texas colleges are rife with professional second-base prospects, either players who currently man the position (Texas A&M's Brodie Greene, Rice's Brock Holt) or who figure to move there from shortstop (Hansen, Dallas Baptist's Ryan Goins). Hansen is the best of the group because he has the most polished bat. After hitting nine homers in his first two seasons, he exploded for 17 this season, a school record for shortstops. He takes a big swing and has sacrificed some strike-zone discipline for power. He did hit a solid .273 with wood bats in the Cape Cod League last summer. A 6-foot, 185-pound switch-hitter, he gets good leverage in his swing from both sides of the plate. Hansen is a below-average runner with a fringy arm, which is why he'll move off shortstop once he turns pro. His instincts make him an effective baserunner and defender. He profiles as an offensive second baseman or utilityman, and he has shown his versatility by starting for the Bears at second base as a freshman and third base as a sophomore.
6 188 Florida Marlins Dustin Dickerson 1B Texas
Dickerson projected as a possible second-round pick coming out of high school in 2006, but signability concerns dropped him to the Nationals in the 15th round. Scouts loved his sweet lefthanded swing but didn't like the adjustments he made at Baylor, as he spread out his stance and became more of an opposite-field hitter. He batted just .303 with seven homers in his first two seasons. Dickerson started pulling more pitches again this year, maximizing the strength in his 6-foot-4, 205-pound frame. He led the Bears with a .377 average, fashioned a 24-game hitting streak and hit 10 homers. He has a patient approach at the plate and makes consistent contact. Though he's reasonably athletic and runs well for his size, most of Dickerson's value lies in his bat. A high school third baseman, he moved to first base at Baylor and is only an adequate defender. His offensive potential could get him drafted as high as the third round.
Dickerson agreed to a $150,000 bonus with the Marlins on July 11 and played in 46 games at short-season Jamestown. However, his deal was voided on Oct. 11, making him a free agent.
8 240 Detroit Tigers Craig Fritsch RHP Texas
An all-star summer in the Cape Cod League positioned righthander Craig Fritsch as a top-three-rounds pick in 2009 as a draft-eligible sophomore. But he quickly pitched himself out of Baylor's rotation this spring, casting his draft status in doubt. When Fritsch is on, he has a 91-92 mph fastball that touches 95 and a good slider and can locate both pitches. He has the potential to add velocity as he adds strength to his 6-foot-4, 180-pound frame. At the same time, he's maddeningly inconsistent and scouts question his mental toughness. He pitched much better for the Bears as a reliever, where his fringe changeup and command weren't as much of a drawback. His disappointing year and extra leverage won't help him in the draft, which could mean that he'll return to Baylor for 2010.
9 288 Boston Red Sox Kendal Volz RHP Texas $550,000
Expectations were high for Volz after he showed a 92-95 mph fastball and a low-80s slider with late break as Team USA's closer last summer. He didn't allow an earned run in 14 innings, saved the gold-medal game at the FISU World Championships in the Czech Republic and looked like a possible top-10 pick for 2009. But his stuff had gone backwards so much by May that he might not even go in the first three rounds. His fastball parked in the high 80s and flattened out, and his slider no longer was a weapon. His delivery looked different, containing some ugly recoil, and his command got worse as well. After he dropped his last three starts, Baylor used him out of the bullpen in the postseason. Volz has flashed an effective changeup and has a 6-foot-5, 225-pound frame built for a workhorse role, so he has the ingredients to be a starter at the next level--provided his previous fastball, slider and command return. If not, he looked well suited for a late-inning role last summer. But outside of his time with Team USA, he has been hit harder than someone with his stuff should.
19 591 Los Angeles Angels Adam Hornung OF Texas
31 935 Cleveland Indians Raynor Campbell 3B Texas