Players signed indicated in Bold

Round Overall Team Player Position State Bonus
4 121 Colorado Rockies Kent Matthes OF Ala. $200,000
Matthes has never been drafted, even though he was an Aflac All-American in 2004 in high school and was a solid college player as a sophomore and junior, hitting 19 home runs over two seasons though his poor plate discipline (26 walks, 92 strikeouts) held him back. He has put it all together this season, however, prompting one area scout to call the fact that Matthes hasn't been drafted "an indictment of our industry." He has pro tools, and has since high school. He's athletic and a solid-average runner, as well as a good baserunner (27 for 30 on stolen bases the last three seasons), with an average to plus arm that most consider suitable for right field. He'd be an above-average defender in left field if he moves there, and he might because his arm doesn't play plus at times due to a long transfer. He has plenty of raw power, though some wonder if he'll produce enough game power for a corner outfield spot. Alabama coaches believe he started to pick up on breaking balls better during the team's fall tour of Cuba, and Matthes carried that confidence into the spring. As he improved his approach, he turned his power into production, leading Division I with 28 home runs. He made more consistent contact and drove the ball to all fields, helping him hit .365 after entering the season with a .293 career average. Matthes doesn't have major mechanical issues with his swing, so continued improvement with his patience and pitch recognition will determine how his power carries over.
12 364 Texas Rangers Vin DiFazio C Ala.
The rest of Alabama's roster includes several players who should be drafted in the eighth- to 15th-round range, such as senior Vin DiFazio, an offensive catcher with solid receiving ability and a below-average arm.
15 466 Milwaukee Brewers Del Howell LHP Ala. $260,000
Like many college pitchers this spring, Howell's draft stock has been volatile. Recruited as a two-way player, Howell shined as a pitcher in the Texas Collegiate League last summer and earned top prospect honors there, striking out 47 in 34 innings. Alabama intended to use him as a reliever this year, in a middle-relief, "moment of truth" role, but he wasn't 100 percent healthy as he recovered from a case of mononucleosis. In an effort to make up for lost innings, Alabama used Howell as a starter early in the season, and he flashed above-average stuff, including dominating Vanderbilt in a complete-game effort. His fastball touched 94 in relief last summer and sat at 89-92 mph at its best this spring. He's got natural sink and tail on the fastball as well and complements it with a good, hard slider in the low 80s. In relief, Howell was a two-pitch guy, but he flashed an average changeup this spring. He has thrown fewer than 100 innings in college, making him an intriguing, fresh arm for scouts who have seen him throw well. He doesn't have the innings under his belt to know how to get out of jams or fight through innings when he doesn't have his best stuff. He could go anywhere from the second to the fourth round.
15 467 Philadelphia Phillies Austin Hyatt RHP Ala.
The rest of Alabama's roster includes several players who should be drafted in the eighth- to 15th-round range. Righthander Austin Hyatt, the staff ace this year, is a quality senior who is a command-oriented fastball/changeup pitcher, with the changeup his best pitch.
36 1085 Cleveland Indians Austin Evans RHP Ala.
36 1100 Chicago Cubs Brandon May 2B Ala.