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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 81 Washington Nationals Trevor Holder RHP Georgia Ga. $200,000
Holder was a 10th-round pick last season and should go in about the same range this June. He allowed 19 home runs in 92 innings as he failed to harness his improved velocity. Holder's fastball touched 95 and sat in the 91-94 mph range for much of the spring, but it's straight as an arrow at that speed, and hitters seemed to be running to the bat rack rather than being intimidated by the velocity. He has more movement when he throws it 88-91 mph, setting up a solid slurvy breaking ball and fringy changeup. Reliever Jeff Walters has a pro body at 6-foot-3, 192 pounds, and pro pitches with a 90-92 mph fastball and solid-average slider. A 30th-round pick last year out of St. Petersburg (Fla.) JC, his changeup has its moments and could help him start in pro ball. He lacks command of his stuff, and no pitch or trait separates him from the pack.
2 82 Seattle Mariners Kyle Seager 2B North Carolina N.C. $436,500
A three-year starter for North Carolina, Seager is an area scout favorite, not to mention a player opposing coaches respect immensely. National evaluators have a harder time pegging him because he doesn't fit a neat profile. His best tool is his bat. He has a smooth, balanced swing and makes consistent contact with gap power. He ranked third in the nation in 2008 with 30 doubles and was on a similar pace in 2009. He has a patient approach but doesn't project to hit for much home run power because of his modest bat speed and flat swing plane. While he's a fringy runner, he's a fine baserunner. Seager played second base for his first two seasons and moved to third this year, where he has played good defense. Featuring an average arm and impressive agility, he's an average defender at third, if not a tick above. Scouts who like him see a Bill Mueller type who doesn't fit the profile but grinds out at-bats and outs in the field. His detractors see him as a safe pick with low upside and a future reserve or utility player.
3 83 San Diego Padres Jerry Sullivan RHP Oral Roberts Okla. $430,200
Sullivan has won all-conference honors and led Oral Roberts to the Summit League regular-season and tournament championships in each of his three college seasons, but coaches and scouts think he may just be scratching the surface of his potential. A top high school prospect for the 2006 draft before Tommy John surgery in November 2005 caused him to miss his senior season, Sullivan offers a nice combination of present stuff and future projection. His fastball sits in low 90s and touches 94 mph, and he does a good job of using his 6-foot-4, 220-pound frame to throw it downhill. His heater also features armside run, and he usually commands it well. He's still working on the consistency of his secondary pitches. When he's at his best, his slider is a slightly above-average pitch and his changeup is a plus offering. A strong, well-conditioned athlete, he repeats his delivery well and throws strikes. Sullivan, who has pitched well in two summers in the Cape Cod League, slumped slightly as a sophomore before bouncing back this spring. A potential No. 3 starter in the majors, he figures to get drafted between the third and fifth rounds.
4 84 Pittsburgh Pirates Evan Chambers OF Hillsborough (Fla.) CC Fla. $423,900
Originally committed to Florida after prepping in the Lakeland, Fla., area, Chambers wound up at Hillsborough CC after getting just eight at-bats in 2008 for the Gators. At 5-foot-9, 215 pounds, he has been getting compared to Kirby Puckett and Kevin Mitchell since his high school days for his short, thick, strong body. He's athletic and an above-average runner, which explains in part why he was a 19th-round pick of the Rockies out of high school in 2007. Chambers' thick frame helps him generate surprising raw power, which played with wood last summer, when he hit seven homers in the New England Collegiate League with Keene (N.H.). His speed helps him play a passable center field, and his arm is below-average but good enough for center. The whole question with Chambers is how he'll hit as a pro, as he has bat speed and has shown the ability to hit good velocity. He also has a choppy swing and some issues with pitch recognition. Scouts that think Chambers will learn to lay off breaking balls out of the dirt could push for him in the first five rounds, leaving those who doubt his bat--and have him turned in as a sixth-to-10th rounder--missing their chance.
5 85 Baltimore Orioles Tyler Townsend 1B Florida International Fla. $417,600
Among hitters who improved their cause this spring, the fastest riser was Florida International's Tyler Townsend, who had a monstrous performance, batting .434/.512/.858 with 24 home runs and 77 RBIs. He hit with wood last summer in an MVP performance in the Valley League, and FIU coach Turtle Thomas compares him favorably to Brad Hawpe, whom he coached at Louisiana State. Scouts agree that Townsend has a smooth lefthanded swing that should translate to wood. The debate comes in whether Townsend can hold down right field, as Hawpe has as a pro. More likely, Townsend will be a fringy left fielder or first baseman, as he's a below-average runner with average arm strength. Teams looking for college hitters with a track record of performance could take Townsend in the first five rounds.
6 86 San Francisco Giants Chris Dominguez 3B Louisville Ky. $411,300
Dominguez's combination of size (6-foot-4, 235 pounds), power and arm strength is as imposing as any player in this draft. He hits tape-measure shots in batting practice and games, and he has four home run crowns to his credit (New England Collegiate League in 2006, Big East Conference and Cape Cod League in 2008, Big East with a school-record 25 in 2009). "You always worry that he's going to swing and miss, but he's going to hit 25-30 homers if he makes contact," an area scout says. While Dominguez continues to chase breaking balls, he has made strides as a hitter. His 55 strikeouts in 64 games this spring were a far cry from the 88 whiffs he had in 66 games as a redshirt freshman in 2006. He has quieted his approach and shortened his stroke without compromising his power. He doesn't possess an abundance of speed, but he has improved his conditioning and has enough quickness and instincts to have stolen 19 bases in 25 attempts. Scouts still wonder how dominant Dominguez might be on the mound after he showed a mid-90s fastball as a freshman reliever, but he doesn't want to pitch and hasn't taken the mound in the least two years. His arm is an asset at third base, and he has the hands and reactions for the position. He made 23 errors this spring and his range is fringy, so he's not a lock to stay at the hot corner. The Rockies thought they had an agreement with Dominguez when they selected him in the fifth round last year as a draft-eligible sophomore, but he ultimately declined to sign. He'll likely go a round or two earlier this time around.
7 87 Atlanta Braves David Hale RHP Princeton N.J. $405,000
A premium athlete with a prototype pitcher's frame (6-foot-2, 195 pounds) and a lightning-quick arm, Hale has split time between pitching and playing center field in three years at Princeton, and many scouts believe he could take off once he starts concentrating on pitching full-time in pro ball. The biggest knock on Hale is that he has never dominated in the Ivy League--he went 2-3, 4.43 with 47 strikeouts and 24 walks in 41 innings this spring--or in the Cape Cod League, but his power stuff is undeniable. Hale helped himself considerably in his final outing of the season in front of a bevy of scouts, holding his 92-93 mph fastball velocity into the sixth inning and regularly reaching 95-96. He has topped out at 97 this year and pitches with minimal effort, but some scouts say his fastball is flat and easy to pick up. At times he'll flash a plus slider in the 84-86 range, reaching 88, but other times the pitch is sweeping and he struggled to command it. Hale still needs to learn to command his stuff in the strike zone, and questions about his ability to do so lead many scouts to project him as a reliever, though he'll show some feel for a changeup every once in a while.
8 88 Cincinnati Reds Donnie Joseph LHP Houston Texas $398,000
Joseph had little success in his first two years at Houston, bouncing between roles while battling his control and command. He finally harnessed his arm strength this spring, posting a 2.16 ERA, 11 saves and 75 strikeouts in 50 innings. The athletic 6-foot-3, 185-pounder now works consistently with a lively 90-93 mph fastball after often having to dial it down to 87-90 to find the plate in the past. He also has come up with a reliable breaking ball, a hard slider that gives him two legitimate weapons for pro ball. Joseph still doesn't have a trustworthy offspeed pitch and his control still isn't sterling, so he profiles to remain a reliever at the next level. He has enough stuff to be much more than a lefty specialist, and he should go somewhere between the third and fifth rounds.
9 89 Detroit Tigers Wade Gaynor 3B Western Kentucky Ky. $392,400
Western Kentucky made its deepest NCAA playoff run ever, reaching the regional finals. Third baseman Wade Gaynor became the first Hilltopper ever to record a 20-20 season, batting .371 with 25 homers and 21 steals. The 6-foot-4, 213-pounder stands out for his size, bat speed and righthanded power. He has a lot of hand movement before he swings, which could affect his ability to hit for average in pro ball. He has athleticism but is an inconsistent defender.
10 90 Colorado Rockies Ben Paulsen 1B Clemson S.C. $391,000
Paulsen's father Tom Riginos is Clemson's assistant coach and recruiting coordinator, and Paulsen has made him proud by being the Tigers' best hitter this season. He's more of a hitter in the Mark Grace mold, with a smooth lefthanded swing. He uses the whole field and ranked second in the ACC (behind only Dustin Ackley) in hits. Paulsen's ultimate value is tied to his power; he's just an average defender and is limited to first base. His lack of patience at the plate works against him in terms of getting to his power, as at times he doesn't work himself into power hitter's counts. Teams that focus on his strong Cape Cod League performance (.290/.335/.497, eight home runs) could pop Paulsen as high as the third round. Skeptics will recall Michael Johnson, a Clemson first baseman drafted 54th overall in 2002 whose slider bat speed made him a 4-A player.
11 91 Kansas City Royals Wil Myers C/3B Wesleyan Christian Academy, High Point, N.C. N.C. $2,000,000
Myers emerged last summer and fall as one of the more intriguing bats in the class, and he earned first-round buzz as the year progressed despite poor private-school competition in North Carolina. Most clubs were judging him based on his strong showcase performance, where he showed the athleticism and feel for hitting to project as an average or above-average big league bat. Scouts consider him one of the draft's safer hitters, with a smooth swing he repeats and quick, strong hands. He has the bat speed and leverage to produce future power. A South Carolina recruit, Myers plays all over the field for his high school team--showing upper 80s velocity as a pitcher--but scouts want to try him behind the plate, where he's shown solid catch-and-throw tools. He has yet to handle premium stuff on a consistent basis, so there's no guarantee he'll remain a catcher. An average runner, he has even drawn Dale Murphy as a comparison, right down to a move to right or even center field if catching doesn't work out. Myers doesn't figure to last past the supplemental round.
12 92 Oakland Athletics Justin Marks LHP Louisville Ky. $375,300
Marks started winning immediately at Louisville, quickly joining the rotation as a freshman in 2007 and earning victories in the Big East tournament and NCAA regional clinchers during the Cardinals' run to their first-ever College World Series. In three seasons, he has become the program's career leader in wins (29), ERA (2.96) and strikeouts (305 in 301 innings). He set another school mark with 11 victories this season. Marks doesn't have an overpowering pitch but he's a lefty with command of four solid offerings: a lively 90-92 mph fastball, a slider, a downer curveball and a changeup. Outside of a rough time in the Cape Cod League last summer, he has been very consistent. Marks has a good 6-foot-3, 195-pound frame, though there's some violence in his delivery from a high three-quarters slot. He could beat out more ballyhooed Chris Dominguez to become the first Louisville player drafted this year, with both figuring to go near the third round.
13 93 Texas Rangers Robbie Erlin LHP Scotts Valley (Calif.) HS Calif. $425,000
Erlin is a 5-foot-11, 170-pound lefthander from the Santa Cruz area, and several scouts have said the same thing about him: "If he were two inches taller, you'd be talking about him as a first-rounder." And while some scouts lament the cookie-cutter approach to drafting, it doesn't hurt Erlin as much because he's a lefty. Despite the small frame, he has life on his fastball, pitching at 89-92 mph. He commands the pitch to both sides of the plate and has an above-average curveball--a hammer he can throw for strikes in any count. He can get underneath his changeup a little bit, but it too has a chance to be above-average. Erlin is regarded as a great kid and is committed to Cal Poly.
14 94 Cleveland Indians Joe Gardner RHP UC Santa Barbara Calif. $363,000
Gardner first gained traction as a draft prospect with an excellent showing in Alaska last summer. A tall and lanky 6-foot-5, 220 pounds with a near sidearm delivery, Gardner is somewhat reminiscent of Tyson Ross, drafted last year out of Cal. His best pitch is his 91-93 mph fastball, which has natural heavy sinking action. His secondary pitches lag behind. He has some sink on his changeup but has trouble locating the pitch, and his curveball and slider have been mostly flat and rarely find the strike zone. Mechanics are also a concern with Gardner, who has a tendency to open up his front side too quickly and then land on a stiff front leg. If he improves his mechanics and secondary stuff, he could easily profile as a middle-of-the-rotation starter, though many scouts feel he fits best as a reliever, able to use his nasty sinker to induce groundballs.
15 95 Arizona Diamondbacks Keon Broxton OF Santa Fe (Fla.) CC Fla. $358,000
Broxton was the Phillies' 29th-round pick in 2008 but didn't sign, instead attending junior college and pulling out of his Florida Atlantic football/baseball commitment. He's more of an athlete than a hitter at this piont, with raw power and good speed. He's raw defensively as well but got some late draft helium with a big performance in the NJCAA postseason. He's an average-to-plus runner with the chance of staying in center field down the line.
16 96 Los Angeles Dodgers Brett Wallach RHP Orange Coast (Calif.) CC Calif. $351,900
Wallach is the son of Tim Wallach, a 1979 first-round draft pick who was a longtime major leaguer with the Expos and Dodgers. Brett possesses a nearly ideal frame for a pitcher; at 6-foot-3 he's lanky and projectable. Right now his fastball ranges from 88-89 mph, and his body promises more velocity in the future. His secondary pitches are excellent. Wallach features a slurve, which when thrown well has quick and late break. His changeup is his best pitch, showing sudden late drop while thrown with the same arm speed as his fastball. He has a smooth delivery, and his fluid arm action permits the ball to leave his hand easily. Wallach presents scouts with a complete package. He combines a big league lineage, projectable frame, smooth delivery, and an excellent feel for three pitches.
17 97 Florida Marlins Marquise Cooper OF Edison HS, Huntington Beach, Calif. Calif. $345,000
Marquise Cooper is a speedy 17-year-old who has been clocked at 6.4 seconds in the 60-yard dash. He's smallish and strong, and was a linebacker in football despite not being a huge player. He's still raw and his bat is a work in progress.
18 98 St. Louis Cardinals Joe Kelly RHP UC Riverside Calif. $341,000
Plagued by shoulder trouble early in his college career, Kelly has emerged as one of the nation's top college closers in 2009. At 6-foot-1, he doesn't fit the classic image of the physically intimidating closer, but his stuff is plenty big. In fall ball Kelly flashed a fastball that ranged from 93-96 mph, with wicked natural sink, and he maintained his stuff in the spring and now regularly clocks in at 94-97. Strictly a short relief man, Kelly is an aggressive hurler who wants the ball in pressure situations. He had nine saves this spring for the Highlanders, with 18 strikeouts against five walks in 25 innings, though his 5.33 ERA wasn't impressive. In his delivery, Kelly is reminiscent of Brett Hunter, chosen last year out of Pepperdine, with a high-effort delivery from a low three-quarters arm slot, and he falls off to his left after delivery. Most pitchers begin their pro careers as starters and are then converted to relievers, but Kelly figures to be a closer from the opening bell. His stuff may help him rush through the minors as quickly as any pitcher in the draft class.
19 99 Toronto Blue Jays Jake Barrett RHP Desert Ridge HS, Mesa, Ariz. Ariz.
A horse at 6-foot-4 and 230 pounds, Barrett made the showcase rounds last summer and fall, first with Team USA, then to the Area Code Games and then down to Jupiter, Fla. for the World Wood Bat Tournament with the Rays scout team. Despite pitching nearly year-round, he hasn't showed signs of slowing up this spring. The Arizona State recruit has pitched at 90-92 mph with his fastball and can dial it up to 94, leading his team to a 5-A-II state championship. It's a heavy fastball and Barrett is aggressive on the mound. He has tightened up his curveball that he throws in the upper 70s, and he can throw it for strikes. He hasn't needed a changeup much as an amateur, but it has the potential to be an average pitch as it continues to develop. Barrett is a hard worker who has gotten into better shape this spring.
20 100 Houston Astros Telvin Nash OF Griffin (Ga.) HS Ga. $330,300
Head's biggest rival for top prep hitter this spring was Telvin Nash, a monstrous first baseman at 6-foot-3, 235 pounds. Nash runs below-average but isn't a slug, having played third base at times next to former prep teammate Tim Beckham, the shortstop drafted No. 1 overall last year. Nash has as much power as anyone in the state, with some scouts giving him a 70 grade for his raw power on the 20-80 scale. He has strength, leverage and good enough bat speed, but he's not considered an easy sign. He's committed to Kennesaw State and could come off the board around the fifth round to a team that believes he'll consistently tap into his power.
21 101 Minnesota Twins Ben Tootle RHP Jacksonville State Ala. $324,900
Tootle fits in with other small-college high draft picks such as Kyle Heckathorn, Rex Brothers and Chad Jenkins who gained more experience by going to smaller schools and earning rotation time as freshmen. Tootle threw 174 innings his first two seasons at Jacksonville State and shined last summer in the Cape Cod League, where he ranked as the league's No. 4 prospect. He showed a 94-98 mph fastball last summer and similar velocity at times this spring. He's a hard worker and long-toss fan with a quick arm who holds his above-average velocity deep into games when he's physically right. Tootle missed about a month with a stomach virus that caused him to lose more than 10 pounds. In his first two outings after his time off, his velocity was down, but he was brilliant for four innings against Tennessee Tech, sitting 92-96 mph before he tired in the fifth inning.Tootle's secondary stuff remains in question as does the life on his fastball. He throws a hard slider that grades out as average and a changeup as well, though it's below-average. Most scouts consider Tootle a better bet to relieve despite his ability to throw hard for seven innings, as he showed when the last pitch of his seven-inning complete game against Austin Peay was 98 mph. His draft status might hinge on how he finishes and how well teams saw him last summer. He won't go in the first round as he might have right after last summer's performance, but he shouldn't be far behind his small-school brethren.
22 102 Chicago White Sox Bryan Morgado LHP Tennessee Tenn.
A prominent recruit out of the Miami area, Morgado missed his freshman season after having had Tommy John surgery on Oct. 9, 2006. As he redshirted, coach Rod Delmonico, who recruited him (and several other Miami area players over the years) was fired. But Morgado stuck it out and stayed at Tennessee. Coming back from the surgery, Morgado struggled working as a starter and eventually moved to the bullpen. There Morgado's arm strength played up, though he still didn't dominate. His fastball, a 90-93 mph pitch as a starter, sat in the 92-95 range from the bullpen, and he ran it up to 97 against Louisiana State. He lacked the fastball command or even control to be pitch efficient and go deep into games as a starter, but his fastball control improved in short relief. Morgado's offspeed stuff, fringe-average with fringy control as a starter, played up out of the pen as well, as he threw more strikes with his power slider, an average pitch. He tends to pitch off emotion and needs to mature in that regard if he's to be anything more than a setup man as a pro. An eligible sophomore, Morgado was expected to be a reasonably easy sign as the Volunteers program looks to clean house after a miserable season.
23 103 New York Mets Robbie Shields SS Florida Southern Fla. $315,000
Shields wasn't highly recruited despite a strong senior season in high school, when he hit 18 homers for Pasco High. He wound up at Division II Florida Southern and was having a solid college career, hitting .348 as a sophomore with nine home runs. Still, he was not a well-known commodity before he went to the Cape Cod League. In a short stint with Cotuit, he burst on the scene as a potential first-round pick. Ten games into his stint there, he was hitting .429 with two home runs, but a hurt his right wrist sliding head-first into third base. He wound up staying for five more games before shutting down his summer with what proved to be a hairline fracture and some ligament damage. Shields has had plenty of scrutiny this season as the top talent in the competitive Sunshine State Conference and has had some draftitis, as he had just five homers after hitting 17 in his first two seasons. Shields showed early-round tools with strength in his hands, average speed and middle-infield actions, but he's more likely an offensive second baseman or perhaps a third baseman in the David Bell mode rather than a true shortstop. His modest spring performance likely drops him into the third-round range, but he still has a shot to challenge the second-round record set by Moccasins alumni Lance Niekro (1999) and Brett Tomko (1995).
24 104 Toronto Blue Jays Jake Marisnick OF Poly HS, Riverside, Calif. Calif. $1,000,000
A tall, lanky and projectable 6-foot-4 outfielder, Marisnick's build and raw tools remind scouts of Jeff Francoeur and Dale Murphy. He's one of the best athletes in this draft class and has run a 6.7-second 60-yard dash with a vertical jump of nearly 36 inches (best among those tested at the Area Code Games). He also has a powerful throwing arm, which he shows off in pregame warm-ups. A center fielder in high school, Marisnick projects as a corner outfielder as he fills out. Scouts are split on his future hitting ability. Some are confident he will produce, while others point to mechanical concerns. He's well balanced throughout his swing, and his stride is short and closed. However, a weak beginning hand position sabotaged Marisnick early in the season, keeping him from driving the ball with authority. His frame and athletic skills make him one of the most appealing outfield prospects in the nation, but any club selecting him early will have to be convinced of his hitting potential.
25 105 Milwaukee Brewers Josh Prince SS Tulane La. $304,200
Shortstop Josh Prince had a breakout season, batting .353 and tying for the NCAA Division I lead with 48 steals in 55 attempts. That was a far cry from his performance in 2008, when he batted .236 in his first season at Tulane after transferring from Texas. He struggled last year while recovering from elbow surgery, and getting healthy and wearing glasses to correct an astigmatism led to his turnaround. Prince's best tool is his speed, which makes him a threat on the bases and allows him to cover ground at shortstop. He's not the most fluid defender, but he does have a solid arm. A 6-foot-3, 195-pounder, Prince controls the strike zone, makes contact and offers modest power from the right side. He doesn't use his legs well or get much leverage in his swing, and he'll have to prove he can hit with wood bats.
26 106 Philadelphia Phillies Kyrell Hudson OF Evergreen HS, Vancouver, Wash. Wash. $475,000
It's a down year for Washington's high school players, and teams have split opinions on the state's top prep prospect. On pure athleticism, Hudson rates as one of the best in this year's class. He's a lean but strong 6-foot-1 and 185 pounds. His best tool is his speed, as he runs a 6.4-second 60-yard dash and can get from home to first in 4.3 seconds. If he attends Oregon State, he plans to play both baseball and football. The biggest question with Hudson is if he'll hit. He's raw, sometimes looks overmatched against good pitching and struggles to square balls up even in batting practice. There are more non-believers than believers, and as one scout put it, "I've still never seen a guy steal first base." If the bat doesn't develop, his arm is good enough that putting him on the mound could be a fallback option. On top of the questions about Hudson's bat, scouts aren't sure how much he likes baseball. At times he has shown up late to games, or he sits in the dugout while his teammates shag flyballs and doesn't show any fire. One scout witnessed Hudson lollygagging a five-second time to first base on a groundball to the shortstop, with a team's general manager in the stands. Hudson is a definite project, and some scouts wonder if he'll be overwhelmed by the grind of a minor league season.
27 107 Boston Red Sox David Renfroe SS South Panola HS, Batesville, Miss. Miss. $1,400,000
Renfroe's father Laddie played baseball at Ole Miss, where he was a pitcher and a two-time all-Southeastern Conference selection. If the younger Renfroe makes it to Oxford, he has a chance to exceed his father's accomplishments as a power pitcher who also could be an outstanding college hitter. That's the problem for Ole Miss, though--Renfroe may be too good to get to school. He's a legitimate prospect both ways and reportedly put the word out that he wanted to hit, and that he wanted to sign if the money was right. Renfroe has a polished approach as a hitter, with solid-average power and hitting tools. He's a smooth defender with good hands who should be a capable college shortstop and an outstanding third baseman at the pro level. He has obvious arm strength that also plays on the mound. He sits at 88-92 mph with his fastball and has touched higher, up to 95 at times. He has the ability to spin a breaking ball and has shown a feel for a changeup. Scouts are split on whether he has more upside as a pitcher or as a hitter. He showed his wood-bat power with a home run last year during the Under Armour/Baseball Factory all-star game, easily reaching the Wrigley Field seats. He could go late in the first round as a hitter for a team that wants to buy him away from Ole Miss, though the consensus had him as a second- to third-round talent.
28 108 Tampa Bay Rays Todd Glaesmann OF Midway HS, Waco, Texas Texas $930,000
After a so-so performance on the showcase circuit last summer and surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament last fall, Glaesmann has exceeded expectations this spring. He has emerged as a potential five-tool talent and a possible second-round pick. He has a prototype 6-foot-4, 205-pound frame that should give him plenty of leverage for power, though he employs more of a line-drive approach at this point. Glaesmann has some obvious length to his swing, but he shows patience and should hit for average from the right side of the plate. He has solid speed and arm strength, with the possibility of sticking in center field and the tools to be a standout in right field should he move there down the road. A quality athlete, Glaesmann played quarterback and wide receiver in high school and played through the injury to his left (non-throwing) thumb. One area scout compared him to former Texas high school and college star Drew Stubbs, the eighth overall pick in the 2006 draft, with less athleticism but better baseball skills. Glaesmann has committed to Texas A&M.
29 109 Chicago Cubs Austin Kirk LHP Owasso (Okla.) HS Okla. $320,000
Kirk led Owasso to the Oklahoma 6-A championship, making the Rams the Sooner State's first large school ever to win three straight league titles. He won three games in the final week of the state tournament, concluding with a four-hitter over Edmond's Santa Fe High in the finals for Owasso's ei ghth championship in the last 11 years. Kirk doesn't have a lot of projection remaining in his strong 6-foot-1, 200-pound frame, but he already has quality stuff for a lefthander. He surprised scouts by touching 92 mph in a February scrimmage against Tulsa's Memorial High and ace Jon Reed. Kirk has moved past Reed as the state's No. 2 high school prospect behind projected first-rounder Chad James (Yukon High) by pitching at 88-91 mph all spring after previously topping out in the high 80s. His fastball is explosive and gets on hitters quickly, making it appear even faster. He also consistently stays on top of his improved curveball with his high three-quarters delivery and has an advanced changeup for a high schooler. Kirk could go in the fourth or fifth round if teams believe he'll sign. If he doesn't, he'll head to Oklahoma and get the chance to contribute as a two-way player. He's a first baseman with some lefthanded power.
30 110 Los Angeles Angels Josh Spence LHP Arizona State Ariz.
Arizona State lefthander Josh Spence is hard for hitters--and scouts--to figure out. The Australian won 27 games in two years for Central Arizona JC and was a 25th-round draft pick of the Diamondbacks last year. He came to ASU instead, and few pitchers put up better numbers, as he was 8-1, 2.37, with 99 strikeouts against 24 walks in 80 innings. His fastball peaks at 87 mph, and he uses it well to set up his four offspeed pitches: a changeup, curveball, slider and cutter. He'll throw any of the pitches in any count and any sequence. He throws from a lower three-quarters arm slot and will even throw some of his breaking balls sidearm. Hitters never have comfortable at-bats against him, often walking back to the dugout shaking their heads. But it's not just smoke and mirrors with Spence. His changeup and slider are legitimate plus pitches, and scouts say he shows the hand speed with his slider to indicate that his fastball velocity could improve. Spence pitches with a lot of confidence and never gives in to hitters. Scouts love his makeup; they're just not certain how his repertoire will play in pro ball. He missed a couple of weeks late in the season with a strained ligament in the middle finger of his left hand, but returned by the postseason. He'll likely be drafted by a more statistically inclined team or one with extra picks.