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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 50 Washington Nationals Jeff Kobernus 2B California Calif. $705,500
Kobernus is one of the most versatile players in the nation. His athletic and still projectable 6-foot-2, 195-pound frame fits almost anywhere on the diamond, and indeed he has played several positions during his career at Cal. He played second base this season, overcoming a sluggish start to bat .351/.385/.563 with eight home runs in a disappointing season for the Golden Bears. With above average speed, Kobernus stole 17 bases this spring, giving him 41 for his career. Defensively, Kobernus displays fine range, with excellent hands and playmaking ability. He will make careless errors, as with many young infielders, but his arm and glove grade out to solid-average. Primarily a line drive hitter, Kobernus shows an advanced approach, utilizing the entire field and intelligently looking to go with the pitch when needed. He will flash occasional power, but his forte is gap-to-gap line drives. While Kobernus does not have overwhelming tools in any one area, he is an athletic and well-rounded player who has the potential to fill any number of roles as a professional. Look for the organization that drafts him to start him out as a second baseman, with a move to third possible if he fills out his frame more.
2 51 Seattle Mariners Rich Poythress 1B Georgia Ga. $694,800
After helping Georgia to the College World Series last season, Poythress has had an impressive follow-up season, hitting consistently as the anchor of Georgia's lineup. He recovered from a torn ACL in the fall of his freshman year to make 38 starts and hit .282. He's hit close to .390 the last two seasons with 36 home runs. Poythress does it more with strength, a polished approach and leverage in his swing rather than pure bat speed. He's more of a hitter rather than a slugger, lacking the raw power that Bulldogs shortstop Gordon Beckham showed. He ranked second in the Southeastern Conference in batting, slugging, on-base percentage and home runs while having a stellar junior season. His swing is geared to use the middle of the field, and he could hit for more power if he learns to pull for power better. Some scouts wonder if he'll hit for power against better velocity and consider him a solid hitter but more of a second-division player rather than a difference-maker. Poythress gave third base a whirl last summer in the Cape Cod League and in the fall but fits better defensively at first base, where his soft hands are an asset.
3 52 San Diego Padres Everett Williams OF McCallum HS, Austin Texas $775,000
Of all the elite high school athletes in this draft, Williams might have the best bat. He has a strong 5-foot-10, 200-pound build and big, quick hands, which allow him to power balls to all fields. One area scout says he's seen Williams hit a 500-foot blast, and the lefthanded hitter finished second in the home run derby at the Aflac All-American Game last summer. He has above-average speed that plays as plus-plus on the bases because of his instincts and aggressive nature. He'll need some time to smooth out his defense in center field, but he's certainly capable of staying there. His arm is fringe-average but playable in center. The biggest knock on Williams is a tendency to play on cruise control. Scouts say he's a good kid who just need to play harder on a more consistent basis. He didn't commit to Texas until March, but if he goes in the first round as expected, he won't suit up for his hometown Longhorns. Williams also has some of the best bloodlines in his draft, as his father played in the NFL, his cousin Cedric Allen pitched in the Reds system and two of his aunts are enshrined in the national softball hall of fame.
4 53 Pittsburgh Pirates Brooks Pounders RHP Temecula (Calif.) Valley HS Calif. $670,000
Among California preps, Temecula Valley High righthander Brooks Pounders has split scouts more than any other player. Pounders' father Brad was a star at UC Riverside and played in the Padres farm system in the 1980s. Brooks is a jumbo-sized 6-foot-5, 240-pounder, who despite his intimidating size is not a fireballer. Instead, he has a feel for four pitches and advanced secondary stuff. His fastball ranges from 88-90 mph, peaking at 91. He throws both a tight curveball and hard slider, both of which have plus potential, and rounds out his repertoire with a changeup. Pounders' frame is not projectable, so he doesn't figure to throw much harder in the future. His fastball is fairly straight, and his command can be inconsistent. Those factors may combine to depress Pounder's draft position, and if he slides he'll end up at Southern California.
5 54 Baltimore Orioles Mychal Givens SS Plant HS, Tampa Fla. $800,000
Givens started making noise as a prospect after his freshman season in high school, and he hasn't stopped. A veteran of the Aflac and Under Armour games from last summer, Givens has been evaluated at a national level repeatedly. Over time, he has evolved as a prospect, going from hitter to pitcher and back again. He has a strong, athletic body and physical frame, with elite tools including one of the best arms in the draft. He's reached 97 mph off the mound in short bursts and still shows above-average velocity from a low arm slot, pitching Plant High deep into the state playoffs. While some scouts do like him better on the mound, most see him as a reliever and see more value as a position player. He has strength and good hands that should allow him to hit for power down the line, though his swing will need tweaking. Defensively, Givens isn't smooth at short but has first-step quickness and plenty of arm. His Oklahoma State commitment isn't considered a significant impediment to him signing in the first three rounds.
6 55 San Francisco Giants Tommy Joseph C Horizon HS, Scottsdale, Ariz. Ariz. $712,500
Hailing from the same Horizon High program that has produced Giants righthander Tim Alderson and Angels shortstop Brandon Wood, Joseph likely won't be a first-rounder like those two. But he shouldn't lag far behind. Having split time between catching and first base in the past, Joseph is behind the plate full time this year. At 6-foot-1 and 215 pounds, the Arizona recruit is a big kid with tree trunks for thighs. He has worked on his defensive fundamentals to stay behind the plate as a pro and is above-average in both arm strength and accuracy. He's been sitting lower and working on the mechanics for blocking. With comparisons to both Mike Napoli and Kelly Shoppach, Joseph's calling card is his bat. In the 2009 Power Showcase, an offseason home run derby, Joseph showed off his well-above-average power by putting a few balls in the upper deck at Tropicana Field, and hit a 465-foot bomb that fluttered the American flag hanging from the catwalk in the left-center field power alley.
7 56 Los Angeles Dodgers Blake Smith OF California Calif. $643,500
California's lefthanded-hitting, righty-pitching Smith perplexed scouts all spring. At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, he has premium size to go with athleticism. He had emerged as a premium prospect last summer with USA Baseball's college national team, when he hit .327 with three homers (second on the team) while also throwing nine scoreless innings, striking out 11. Smith flashes terrific stuff on the mound but struggled in getting hitters out. After early-season difficulties on the mound he has rarely pitched since, finally being relegated only to a DH role by a lat muscle strain. As a pitcher, Smith fires a 92-94 mph fastball, which exhibits fine arm side movement but is straight to his glove side. His 82-84 mph changeup resembles an old-fashioned palm ball, and that pitch shows both arm side movement and "drop dead" action. Unfortunately for Smith, he has poor command and control and gets behind hitters too often. A pitcher with his quality of stuff should not get hit as hard or as frequently as he did this year, when he walked 20 in 20 innings. As an outfielder, Smith has a well above-average right fielder's arm, and his long, sweeping lefthanded swing produces provocative home run power. However, the length and severe uppercut path of his swing may produce holes that professional pitchers can exploit. Observers who saw him regularly with Team USA last summer believe Smith might be better suited for the everyday player role than working on the mound, and see him as fitting the right-field profile perfectly if his bat emerges. However, plenty of scouts believe in Smith's future as a short stint relief man. To be successful in that venture, Smith must greatly improve his command. No one doubts he has the raw stuff to succeed in a middle relief capacity, but he may make it as a hitter as well.
8 57 Cincinnati Reds Billy Hamilton SS Taylorsville (Miss.) HS Miss. $623,600
Hamilton, like many Mississippi prep products, remains raw, as he's never played baseball full-time and needs to face better competition. Hamilton ranks among the fastest players in the draft, a true 70 runner on the 20-80 scale. Hamilton also is among the lightest players, if not the lightest being considered in the first five rounds, checking in at around 150 pounds. One evaluator said he resembles Brewers utilityman Bill Hall at a similar stage of development. Hamilton lacks present strength in his wispy frame, and some teams will walk away from a player whose present bat is short. Hamilton's swing is fairly sound, though, and he's learning to bat lefthanded as well to take advantage of his speed. He has outstanding arm strength, reaching 94 mph off the mound, and might be able to remain a shortstop; if not he'll stay in the middle of the diamond in center field. He's a Mississippi State football recruit, but scouts still consider him signable.
9 58 Detroit Tigers Andy Oliver LHP Oklahoma State Okla. $1,495,000
Oliver starred with Oklahoma State and Team USA in 2008, but he didn't look like the same pitcher at the start of this season. He had trouble locating his fastball, lost a curveball that had been one of college baseball's best and was flying open in his delivery, allowing hitters to get a better look at his pitches. Oliver got back on a roll at the end of the season, pitching inside more and routinely dominating teams with his fastball. It sits at 92-94 mph and touches 95, and he has a slow delivery that lulls hitters to sleep before his heater explodes on them. He relies heavily on his fastball because he never regained his curve. He now employs a cutter/slider as his No. 2 pitch, and he also flashes an average changeup. His strong 6-foot-3, 212-pound frame bodes well for durability. If Oliver can't develop a reliable breaking ball, his fastball velocity and command should make him at worst an effective big league reliever. The NCAA suspended him last May for having an adviser/attorney, Tim Barratta, present during negotiations with the Twins in 2006, when they drafted him in the 17th round out of an Ohio high school. Barratta turned him into the NCAA after the pitcher switched to Scott Boras, but Oliver successfully sued the NCAA and was reinstated. Oliver shouldn't be a tough sign if he's drafted in the first round as expected.
10 59 Colorado Rockies Nolan Arenado 3B El Toro HS, Lake Forest, Calif. Calif. $625,000
Arenado was far from impressive during the summer Area Code Games or the fall scout ball season last year. Flashes of power from his bat were negated by his soft frame, lack of speed and absence of athletic ability. But he has since transformed himself. Now strong and fit at 6-foot-1 and 210 pounds, Arenado's speed is still below-average, but he now exhibits a powerful throwing arm and greatly improved fielding actions. A high school shortstop, Arenado has no chance of staying there after graduation. His improved hands make third base a possibility, but catching is his most likely destination. His muscular build and howitzer arm appear to fit best behind the dish. Scouts are mixed on Arenado's hitting. He has powerful hands that enable him to drive the ball long distances, particularly to the opposite field. But there's some stiffness in his swing, and some scouts worry about his habit of getting too far out front with his front shoulder and arms. Arenado's draft stock jumped during this year's National Classic, when he was named the tournament's most outstanding hitter and was by far the most dominant player. Arenado's power potential alone will get him into the early rounds, in spite of his defensive questions.
11 60 Arizona Diamondbacks Eric Smith RHP Rhode Island R.I. $605,700
Smith has made great strides in three years since arriving at Rhode Island as a raw, immature freshman with mechanical issues and an 85-87 mph fastball. He worked mostly in relief in 2007, then showed a glimmer of his potential that summer in the Atlantic Collegiate League, where he ranked as the No. 7 prospect. He broke out this spring, opening eyes with eight shutout innings in a win against Miami in early March, followed by a strong performance against Cal State Fullerton when he allowed three runs over 6 2/3 innings. Smith now pitches with an 89-93 mph fastball with power sink that he commands at the knees. He adds and subtracts with his slider, sometimes throwing it in the 84-86 mph range, and the pitch can be average or even plus at times, though it remains a bit inconsistent. He also flashes a solid-average changeup and is improving his feel for the pitch. He drops in a curveball occasionally as a show pitch, particularly for a back-door strike against lefties. Smith is a fierce competitor with a physical 6-foot-3, 213-pound build, and he has the best feel for pitching in the Northeast. He's a safe bet to go in the top three rounds, with a chance to go in the top two.
12 61 Chicago White Sox Trayce Thompson OF Santa Margarita Catholic HS, Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif. Calif. $625,000
Thompson is the son of Mychal Thompson, the former NBA star who played on several Los Angeles Lakers NBA championship clubs in the 1980s, and the bloodlines show. A 6-foot-4, 200-pound outfielder, Thompson has terrific bat speed, and his future power potential is exciting. He has a great frame that's both athletic and projectable, and his arm strength is impressive. The primary drawbacks are his instincts and feel for the game. He has the look of a player who is relatively new to baseball and is still learning the basics. He often hesitates in the outfield and won't attempt to throw out runners trying to advance, or will defer to other fielders on balls hit in the gaps. Thompson generates terrific bat speed, but his swing is long on the back end and his timing is affected by his habit of pulling out his front side too quickly. Thompson's selection in this draft would be made on potential alone. If he goes to UCLA, develops his skills and gains experience, he would likely be a much higher pick in 2012.
13 62 Texas Rangers Tommy Mendonca 3B Fresno State Calif. $587,700
Mendonca is well known to college baseball fans for his tremendous performance--offensively and defensively--in last year's College World Series. He was the Most Outstanding Player in Fresno's unlikely run to the title in Omaha, and he has been nearly as good this season. Mendonca can be streaky both offensively and defensively. At 6-foot-1 and 210 pounds, he has unique power from the left side and puts on one of the best batting practice exhibitions in college baseball. He's a flyball hitter who looks to lift everything, and his opposite-field power is outstanding. On the 20-to-80 scouting scale, he already possesses 50 power, and projects to 60 raw power easily. He has a distinctive swing. He starts with his hands high, then drops them into an angled launch position. He can drive a ball out even if he doesn't get all of it. In an early-season game at Loyola Marymount, he was slightly fooled by a changeup, got out front and under the ball but still lofted it out of the park. Scouts worry about the fundamentals of his swing, however. He comes close to locking or blocking his hands out front in an arm bar action, and he shows a weakness with offspeed stuff, setting a Division I record with 99 strikeouts last season. There are similar questions about his defense, where he looks fluid going to his left but not to his right, and his arm varies from cannon to squirt gun. He doesn't run well. Still, the lure of Mendonca's power bat and record of rising to the occasion will entice an organization to select him as early as the second round.
14 63 Cleveland Indians Jason Kipnis OF Arizona State Ariz. $575,000
Kipnis turned down fourth-round money from the Padres last year as a draft-eligible sophomore, and it's looking like a good decision, as he'll likely be a higher selection this time around. Kipnis redshirted at Kentucky as a freshman and was suspended from the team as a sophomore, but he has impressed the Sun Devils with his work ethic and was Pac-10 newcomer of the year in 2008. He has been even better this season, leading the team in batting, on-base percentage and slugging, as well as stolen bases. Kipnis doesn't have one standout tool, but can do a little bit of everything. He has a patient approach and a line-drive swing. He has shown he can hit quality pitching, though he doesn't profile for big power with a wood bat, making him a potential tweener. While his defense in center field has improved, he doesn't have the range to stay there long-term--yet he might not hit enough to man a corner spot. He may also get a chance to try second base.
15 64 Arizona Diamondbacks Marc Krauss OF Ohio Ohio $550,000
After starring in his first two years at Ohio and in the Great Lakes League in between, Krauss went to the Cape Cod League last summer and left as a premium prospect. He led the Cape in RBIs (34) and on-base percentage (.473) and has continued to raise his profile this spring, batting .402 and leading the Mid-American Conference with 27 homers and 70 RBIs. A lefthanded hitter, Krauss has a quick bat and advanced approach, as he has a discerning eye and uses the entire field. He consistently squares balls on the barrel of the bat. Some scouts wonder how much power he'll have with wood, but the consensus is he should have average pop as a pro. Though he's more athletic than most 6-foot-3, 220-pounders and has played some third base, he'll have to be a left fielder at the next level. He has arm strength but his hands, range and quickness are just adequate. Krauss' bat will have to carry him, but it's good enough to do so. As one of the best college hitters in a thin year for them, he could get taken as early as the second round.
16 65 Los Angeles Dodgers Garrett Gould RHP Maize (Kan.) HS Kan. $900,000
Gould just keeps getting better and was quickly pitching his way into the first round. He was the Kansas 6-A pitcher of the year in 2008, when he broke big leaguer Nate Robertson's Maize High record with 95 strikeouts in 57 innings. He won MVP honors at the World Wood Bat Association championship last October, beating Shelby Miller in the quarterfinals and allowing just one hit and one walk while fanning 18 in eight shutout innings. After adding strength in the offseason, Gould has taken his fastball from 88-91 mph in 2008 to 91-94 mph this spring--and it's not even his best pitch. He has one of the best curves among this draft's high schoolers, a power breaker he delivers from a high three-quarters arm slot. He also dabbles with a changeup. Some scouts worry a little about effort in his mechanics, while others like how he stays tall and gets good extension out front. Gould is a quality 6-foot-4, 200-pound athlete who starred as a quarterback in football and as a forward in basketball before deciding to focus on baseball as a senior. He plays the outfield when he's not pitching and has enough righthanded power to play both ways for Wichita State should he attend college. But he'll probably go too high in the draft for that to happen.
17 66 Florida Marlins Bryan Berglund RHP Royal HS, Simi Valley, Calif. Calif. $572,500
Berglund was little known until a local all-star game last December, when he enjoyed a breakout performance and rocketed up draft boards. Berglund is a Swedish citizen who has picked up the American national pastime. His fastball sits in the 90-92 mph range, and his secondary pitches well developed for a prep pitcher. His slider has the makings of a plus pitch, but his best current offering is his changeup, which shows both deception and late drop. Berglund's velocity takes tails off as he progresses through a game, slipping down to 86-87 mph by the third or fourth inning, and he leans too much on his fastball, two problems that should be solved by simple maturity and development. Berglund's projectable 6-foot-4 build, with his three legitimate pitches, make him attractive enough that he probably won't follow through on his commitment to Loyola Marymount.
18 67 St. Louis Cardinals Robert Stock C Southern California Calif. $525,000
Stock is one of the draft's most intriguing players due to his background. He was Baseball America's Youth Player of the Year in 2005 when he was 15, and a year later, Stock skipped his senior year in high school to enroll at Southern California. He's a 19-year-old draft-eligible junior, and his college career has been one of valleys and recent peaks. He was the Trojans' starting catcher and sometime closer his first two seasons, showing modest power, a good fastball and good catch-and-throw skills. He showed raw power and catch-and-throw tools in his first two seasons, particularly arm strength. However, his draft stock suffered; after ranking No. 5 in our Cape Cod League Top 30 following his freshman season, he didn't even make the top 30 last summer, and scouts were stunned by his poor performance on scout day in fall 2008, when his bat looked slow and his pop times sluggish. When Stock got off to a slow start offensively in 2009, attention shifted to his performance on the mound. The Trojans turned to Stock as a starter this year, and he has delivered. He made his first start March 29 and beat Arizona State, striking out 10 in five innings, and hasn't looked back, registering a complete-game win at Arizona and showing surprising polish. His delivery is fairly easy, giving him good control of an 88-92 mph fastball that can hit 95 and a surprisingly good changeup that some scouts consider a plus pitch. His low-80s breaking ball also grades out as average, and Stock now figures to go out in the first three rounds as a pitcher--if he proves signable.
19 68 Toronto Blue Jays Jake Eliopoulos LHP Sacred Heart Catholic HS, Newmarket, Ont. Ontario
It's a down year in general for Canada. Unlike the past two years, there won't be a first-rounder from the Great White North, but Eliopoulos will likely be the highest-drafted player from Ontario since Scott Thorman was a first-round pick in 2000. Jim Eliopoulos, a catcher on the 1984 Canadian Olympic team, adopted Jake from Ukraine as a baby. At 6-foot-3 and 170 pounds, Eliopoulos is long and lean with room for projection. He's also young in a lot of regards, which scouts like. He looks young in the face, leading them to believe he'll fill out and add velocity and, being from Canada, he doesn't have the mileage on his arm that a similar pitcher in California or Florida might have. Eliopoulos' fastball currently sits in the 88-91 mph range with good life and movement. His mechanics are easy and clean and he also throws a curveball with some late depth and a changeup that is above-average for a high school pitcher. While nothing really jumps out about Eliopoulos, he's a complete package.
20 69 Houston Astros Tanner Bushue RHP South Central HS, Farina, Ill. Ill. $530,000
A sprained right knee that didn't require surgery caused Bushue to miss most of his junior season and the summer showcase circuit in 2008, severely limiting his exposure. Now that he's healthy again, he has vaulted past lefthanders Ian Krol (Neuqua Valley HS, Naperville) and Jerad Grundy (Johnsburg HS) as the best prep prospect--and perhaps the top draft pick--in Illinois this spring. An all-area basketball player who averaged 18.2 points per game as a senior, Bushue is just beginning to realize his potential on the diamond. An extremely athletic 6-foot-4, 180-pounder, he repeats his delivery well and throws with little effort. That allows him to maintain his 88-90 mph fastball into the late innings, and he can reach 93 mph with the promise of more to come. Bushue's curveball is a solid-average pitch, though he needs to use it more often, and he also messes around with a slider. He hasn't made much progress with a changeup, a pitch he'll need to remain a starter at higher levels. He has signed with John A. Logan (Ill.) CC rather than a four-year school and should be signable in the first 10 rounds. A team that believes in his upside could pop Bushue as early as the fourth round.
21 70 Minnesota Twins Billy Bullock RHP Florida Fla. $522,000
A 20th-round pick out of high school, Bullock has been a similar pitcher in college to what he was as a prep. For most of his career, he didn't maximize the leverage his 6-foot-6 frame provides, and his velocity was inconsistent, whether he was starting (as he did once this spring, at Arkansas) or in a relief role. However, Bullock has taken off in a relief role and become the top draft-eligible bullpen arm in the Southeastern Conference. Bullock was at his best when Florida swept Georgia in Athens, hitting 97 mph several times with his fastball. He also held his velocity in pitching in all three games of that series. While scouts have considered him a tease due to his inconsistency, Bullock has pitched more consistently as a closer. His breaking ball has evolved from a curveball to a slider, and at times it reaches 83 mph with tilt. Bullock still tends to leave his fastball up at times, leading to five home runs allowed in 40 innings, and could pitch downhill more frequently with refinements to his delivery. Despite lashing ability for a changeup in the past, Bullock seems to have taken to the closer role, emphasizing power over touch.
22 71 Chicago White Sox David Holmberg LHP Port Charlotte (Fla.) HS Fla. $514,000
Florida's recruiting class includes the nation's top two prep lefties in Holmberg, who led the state in strikeouts as a junior, and Patrick Schuster, who threw four no-hitters this spring. Holmberg is teammates with Ricky Knapp, the son of Tigers pitching coach Rick Knapp, and the elder Knapp has helped Holmberg along the way with everything from conditioning drills to advice on the draft process. Thanks to his size and pro approach, Holmberg surpasses Schuster as the better pro prospect thanks. He's all of 6-foot-4 if not a bit taller and has a big frame, easily capable of carrying 225 pounds or so. His fastball has improved over the past year, sitting at 87-88 mph and at times hitting 90. His secondary stuff is his current calling card, and depending on the day he showed both a plus changeup and a curveball with 12-to-6 break and depth. Some scouts even like his slider better than his curveball, but the key is he throws all four for strikes. Holmberg was considered a difficult sign thanks to his Florida commitment, strong academic background and lack of present fastball velocity. However, he has the talent to go in the first five rounds to a team that believes his fastball will become an average-to-plus pitch.
23 72 New York Mets Steve Matz LHP Melville HS, East Setauket, N.Y. N.Y. $895,000
The consensus top prep pitching prospect in the Northeast, Matz offers plenty of projection as well as good present stuff. For most of the spring, Matz sat in the 89-91 mph range, but he routinely ran his fastball up to 93-94, and the pitch has some glove-side life. Scouts particularly like the way he attacks hitters inside with his heater. He also shows a solid-average changeup with good deception that sometimes rates as plus. He began throwing a slider midway through the season, but most scouts prefer his 73-75 mph three-quarters curveball, which flashes average to plus but more often rates as a below-average offering at this stage. Matz has a big, projectable frame at 6-foot-3, 185 pounds, but there are some questions about his durability because he had trouble staying healthy for a full season until this year. He also needs to work on his delivery, as he tends to cut himself off and has a head jerk. There is some risk with Matz, but he has enough upside that some team is very likely to take him in the top three rounds and buy him out of a commitment to Coastal Carolina.
24 73 Milwaukee Brewers Max Walla OF Albuquerque Academy N.M. $499,000
Walla doesn't have the size, speed or arm that make him stand out on a baseball field. Then he steps into the batter's box and people stop what they're doing to watch. Walla can flat-out hit. Drawing comparisons to Jaff Decker, a supplemental first-round pick last year, Walla is similar in that he's 5-foot-11 and 195 pounds. Walla doesn't have the arm strength that Decker displays, but he has a better body. He's swam competitively since he was six years old and was part of his school's relay team that broke two state records this year. He has a compact swing and consistently hits balls on the sweet spot. Swinging from the left side, Walla generates considerable power for his size. Between his junior year in Albuquerque and the summer showcase circuit, Walla hit 51 home runs. His coach said that at a workout for some scouts this spring, they wanted to see him take 25 swings with a metal bat and then 25 with wood. He hit 18 home runs with the metal, switched to wood and hit 18 more over the fence. He was also a standout pitcher for his team this year, leading them to a state championship, but his future is as a hitter. A favorite of area scouts for his play and his makeup, Walla has been tough to crosscheck as a high school player in Albuquerque. If he grew up in the Phoenix area, like Decker, he would likely go a lot higher in the draft, but it's assumed he'll fall to around the fifth round, which could increase his chances of ending up at Oklahoma State.
25 74 Milwaukee Brewers Cameron Garfield C Murrieta (Calif.) Valley HS Calif. $492,200
In a banner year for prep catchers, Garfield stands out as one of the best pure defenders. At 6-feet and 190 pounds, Garfield is fit, strong and powerful. His pop times range from 1.85 to 1.90 seconds at showcase events, with one scout clocking a 1.78, and he has an above-average arm. Scouts' primary worry is that Garfield shines at showcases and struggles in games. He often puts on eye-opening power exhibitions during batting practice, but he has trouble carrying those results into games. He has a breathtakingly quick bat, but he often pulls off the ball and opens his front side, pulling the ball hard but foul. Failure to track the pitch and let it get deep throws off his timing, though he will occasionally show the ability to stay back on the breaking ball. Doubts may exist about Garfield's bat, but few doubts exist about his defense. His bat shows the promise of power, but he'll need improvement to bring it up to big league average.
26 75 Philadelphia Phillies Kelly Dugan OF Notre Dame HS, Sherman Oaks, Calif. Calif. $485,000
Switch-hitting first baseman Kelly Dugan has some power now in his 6-foot-3, 205-pound frame and projects to hit for more down the line, though he likely will wind up doing that at Pepperdine. He's a solid runner at around 7.1 seconds over 60 yards and has decent arm strength, so he could give the outfield a try. He's the son of actor/director/producer Dennis Dugan, who has worked frequently with Adam Sandler for years.
27 76 New York Yankees J.R. Murphy C Pendleton School, Bradenton, Fla. Fla. $1,250,000
The scouting consensus seemed to be that Murphy had risen to the top of the pile of Florida prep catchers by the end of the season, after an amazing spring playing for the IMG Academy in Bradenton. Murphy hit .627 with 11 home runs in 102 at-bats, rapping 34 extra-base hits overall and striking out just four times. That built off a strong summer and fall performance, as Murphy starred for the Florida Bombers during Connie Mack play and the World Wood Bat tournament in Jupiter, Fla., in October 2008. Murphy's bat attracts most of the attention, as he has a short, sharp righthanded swing that generates good bat speed and plate coverage. Scouts grade his hit tool ahead of his power, though he's expected to produce average power with wood. He's also athletic, having made a shift from outfield (and occasionally third base) to catcher. He's shown he's more than capable of handling catcher, showing plus arm strength, solid receiving ability and a quick transfer. The Miami recruit has intelligence and makeup needed for the position, as well, and had hit his way into supplemental round consideration.
28 77 Boston Red Sox Alex Wilson RHP Texas A&M Texas $470,700
Wilson projected as a possible first-round pick before he blew out his elbow in the Cape Cod League in the summer of 2007, shortly before he transferred from Winthrop to Texas A&M. He redshirted with the Aggies last spring, though he did reach 94 mph in bullpen workouts that attracted a number of scouts. The Cubs took a flier on him in the 10th round last June and followed him when he returned to the Cape in the summer. Chicago reportedly offered him $600,000 to sign but he was looking for $1.5 million. Wilson looked to be in line for that kind of bonus when he opened this season with a 91-95 mph fastball and a true slider, but his stuff slacked off later in the spring and didn't pick up when Texas A&M moved him to the bullpen. By May, his fastball had flattened out and was down to 88-91 mph and his breaking ball had become slurvy. In his final chance to impress scouts, he got pounded by Oregon State in the opening round of the NCAA Division I regionals. Wilson is mainly a two-pitch pitcher, so he projects as a reliever in pro ball. His control has been sharp (105-18 K-BB ratio in 75 innings) for a pitcher in his first season back after elbow reconstruction. He figures to be a second-round pick at this point, though he's believed to be looking for a seven-figure bonus as a 22-year-old junior.
29 78 Tampa Bay Rays Kenny Diekroeger SS Menlo HS, Atherton, Calif. Calif.
Diekroeger stunned all observers at the Area Code Games in Long Beach, ranking first in the SPARQ rankings with an almost unheard of 85.96 score. Kenny ran a blistering 6.68 60 yard dash, and added a phenomenal 34.9 inch vertical leap. As a baseball player, Diekroeger is acceptable as a shortstop but his actions are not exceptional. With his remarkable overall athletic ability, Diekroeger may be a better fit as an outfielder. Kenny showed flashes of interesting hitting ability, but he needs to improve at the plate and develop consistency in his approach and results. Diekroeger figures to be an exceptionally attractive college recruit, given his stunning physical ability combined with terrific grades and a nearly off the charts SAT score. There is little doubt that given his athleticism, Kenny will eventually be drafted in an early round. If his bat advances quickly, that will occur in June 2009. If his bat takes longer to develop, that will occur after three years in a college program.
30 79 Chicago Cubs D.J. LeMahieu 2B Louisiana State La. $508,000
LeMahieu looked like a first-round pick last summer when he starred in the Cape Cod League. Scouts saw enough athleticism in his lanky 6-foot-4, 193-pound frame to think he could play shortstop, and they liked his power potential. But he hasn't played up to that level this spring. Though LeMahieu hit .340 entering the College World Series and sparked Louisiana State's offense from the leadoff spot, scouts expected him to deliver more than four home runs. He employs an inside-out, opposite-field approach, so he should have more power if he turns on more pitches. Scouts also have noted that his swing seems slower and longer this spring. They also think LeMahieu now has no chance at playing shortstop, as he has looked more methodical and less explosive. The Tigers concurred, moving him to second base at midseason after they had trouble turning double plays. His arm has regressed, too, and at shortstop he would need a full windup to make longer throws. A fringe-average runner, LeMahieu may not have the quick feet for second base, either, and he'd have to produce a lot more power if he shifted to third base or the outfield. Further complicating matters is the extra leverage he possesses as a draft-eligible sophomore. Enough scouting directors saw LeMahieu play well on the Cape that he still should get picked in the second or third round, and he may be signable if he goes that high.
31 80 Los Angeles Angels Pat Corbin LHP Chipola (Fla.) JC Fla. $450,000
Corbin attracted much less fanfare out of high school and went to Mohawk Valley (N.Y.) CC in 2008 to play baseball and basketball. He transferred to Chipola for 2009 and emerged as the state's top juco pitching prospect. He has a lean 6-foot-3, 170-pound frame with plenty of projection and a solid-average fastball, touching 92 mph and sitting in the upper 80s. His changeup has made real progress, as has his fastball command. He already had a feel for spinning a breaking ball, which is how he struck out 86 in 74 innings.