Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 78 Tampa Bay Rays Jake Jefferies C UC Davis Calif. $515,000
Jefferies was one of the nation's toughest hitters to strike out and helped drive the Aggies toward a possible regional bid in their first season of eligibility since moving up from Division II. Jefferies' offensive approach will need tweaking as he gets stronger, because now he's interested mostly in making contact rather than driving the ball. He's a solid athlete and an average runner. Defensively, Jefferies impresses scouts with his solid-average catch-and-throw ability. He has good feet and is a quiet receiver, with a fringe-average but accurate arm. While Jefferies doesn't have any true above-average tools, he also lacks any glaring weaknesses, and for a catcher that makes him a good bet to be drafted in the first five rounds.
2 79 Pittsburgh Pirates Jordy Mercer SS Oklahoma State Okla. $508,000
There aren't many all-around shortstops in this draft, and after Tim and Gordon Beckham go off the board at the top of the first round, Mercer might be the best bet to both hit and stay at the position. He has recovered from early season arthroscopic knee surgery in 2007 to display solid-average tools across the board. Though he's big for a shortstop at 6-foot-3 and 200 pounds, he has smooth actions. His range and hands are fine, and he enhances his defensive package with a plus arm. Mercer doubles as Oklahoma State's closer, powering through a rough delivery with 91-94 mph fastballs, hard sliders and grit. He has room to get better as a hitter, as he can add strength and tighten his strike zone. He has improved each year, hitting .345 with 10 homers with a week to go in the regular season after batting a combined .284 with 11 homers in his first two seasons. Mercer's speed is slightly above-average, and he's an instinctive runner if not a basestealer.
3 80 Kansas City Royals Tyler Sample RHP Mullen Prep, Denver Colo. $500,000
Sample began the year behind Kentucky recruit Andy Burns on the Colorado pecking order, and he didn't figure to move up draft boards after perennial power Cherry Creek High torched him in his second start of the spring. But Sample bounced back from his only poor start to emerge as the state's best prospect and the latest heir to Colorado's recent pitching tradition. The state has produced six pitchers who were first-round picks since 1994--Scott Elarton (1994), Roy Halladay ('95), Brad Lidge ('98), Kyle Sleeth (2002), David Aardsma ('03) and Luke Hochevar ('06). While only Elarton and Halladay came out as high schoolers, Sample looks like he may sign prior to college as well, due to a big, physical body at 6-foot-7 and 240 pounds. Sample's fastball sits 90-92 mph and touches 94 regularly when he's fresh, which wasn't always the case this spring; he sometimes started one day and then relieved three days later for his high school team, a dangerous proposition for a pitcher who already had Tommy John surgery as a prep sophomore. What separates Sample is his knuckle-curveball, an above-average pitch at times. It's especially impressive considering he's doing it at altitude. Sample has development to make, such as refining his command and finding a changeup, but his present stuff and body make him a good bet in the sandwich round.
4 81 Baltimore Orioles L.J. Hoes 2B St. John's HS, Washington D.C. $490,000
Hoes first popped on the scouting radar in the summer of 2006, when he made USA Baseball's youth national team. The following summer he competed for the junior national team and has become known as an athlete on the baseball field. None of his tools are legitimate pluses, but all of them are at least slightly above-average. Scouts know Hoes fits somewhere on the diamond, but they aren't sure where. He has good speed but not quite enough to profile as a center fielder. He's a better than average hitter with power, but doesn't show the pop necessary to play a corner outfield position. He shows more power to the opposite field now and often hits the ball on the ground to the left, his pull side. Hoes has the athleticism and the plus arm to play almost any position, and it wouldn't be far-fetched to see him try the infield. With questions about his profile and a commitment to North Carolina, Hoes could be a tough sign.
5 82 San Francisco Giants Roger Kieschnick OF Texas Tech Texas $525,000
Coming off a summer during which he tied Pedro Alvarez for the Team USA lead with seven homers, Kieschnick had a shot to go in the first round, with his chances enhanced by a lack of quality college outfielders. But he hasn't delivered as much as hoped, chasing too many pitches out of the strike zone and batting just .300 entering the final week of the regular season--this after hitting .305 as a sophomore. The 6-foot-3, 215-pound Kieschnick has above-average power to all fields, but until he shows more discipline, pitchers can exploit his aggressiveness. He's not one-dimensional, however, as he has solid-average speed and arm strength, making him a prototypical right fielder. His game and his build are reminiscent of his cousin, former Cubs first-round pick Brooks Kieschnick. Roger ranks as the top position player in Texas in a down year for the state, but he's more likely to go in the sandwich or second round now.
6 83 Florida Marlins Edgar Olmos LHP Birmingham HS, Van Nuys, Calif. Calif. $478,000
Tall and stringy with a basketball player's build at 6-foot-5, Olmos delivers his 87-89 mph fastball toward home plate with a sidearm, buggy-whip motion. His projectable frame and loose arm action suggest Olmos will significantly increase his velocity as he fills out, and he has already touched the low 90s several times. An Arizona recruit, Olmos exhibits a fine feel for his secondary pitches. His slow curve shows sweeping movement with a hint of wiffle-ball action. He also offers a changeup that has a bit of screwball rotation. Mechanically, Olmos does an excellent job of keeping his front side closed and showing the piping on his right pant leg to the hitter as long as possible. However, in his delivery he wraps his arm and needs to get fuller extension on his finish. Also, his arm slot varies from fastball to curve, and he tips his breaking ball by "screwing in a light bulb" as he grips the ball in his glove. All of these problems should be easily correctable.
7 84 Cincinnati Reds Zach Stewart RHP Texas Tech Texas $450,000
Like Andrew Cashner, Stewart is a former junior college starter who has thrived after transferring to a Big 12 school and moving to the bullpen. His best pitch is a 92-96 mph fastball with filthy sink. Early in the season, he showed a sharp slider that some scouts graded as a plus-plus offering, though it has become more sweepy as the draft approached. Stewart also shows the makings of an average changeup in bullpen workouts, leading some clubs to think he could move back to the rotation in pro ball. But as a starter at North Central Texas CC in 2007, he pitched at 88-90 with his sinker, a lesser slider and diminished control. Texas Tech moved Stewart into the rotation late in the year, and he gave up 16 hits over nine innings in his first two starts. His 6-foot-1, 175-pound build and inconsistent command also seem to make him more suited for relief work. A possible first-rounder at midseason, Stewart is more of a sandwich- to second-rounder now.
8 85 Boston Red Sox Stephen Fife RHP Utah Utah $464,000
An Idaho native, Fife played in the Little League World Series in 1999, and two of his teammates have joined him this season as roommates and starters at Utah. Fife was just 160 pounds as a prep senior when the Utes first spotted him and he went to Everett (Wash.) CC for a year, pitching against wood bats. He put on 20 pounds that year and now checks in at a physical 6-foot-3 and 215 pounds. He pitched middle relief for much of 2007 before earning a rotation spot late in the year, and entered this season as a possible eighth- to 12th-round pick. He's just learning to pitch with power stuff and started to emerge as a popup prospect in April, when he was on the losing end of a 1-0 duel with San Diego State man-child Stephen Strasburg. While Strasburg struck out 23 in that game, Fife pitched well enough to win and has been at his best since, one-hitting Utah and ramping up his velocity. His fastball sits in the 89-92 mph range and has touched 95, and he's shown the ability to maintain velocity deep into games, with several 93s in the eighth inning of a recent start. Fife throws two breaking balls, a true curveball he can bury or throw for strikes and a decent, early-count slider. His changeup also shows good sink, though he could refine his location and arm speed with the pitch. A late bloomer, Fife just has started to dominate, with 44 strikeouts in 41 innings since the Strasburg matchup. He started getting crosschecked in late April in a game with New Mexico and senior lefty Bobby LaFramboise, and other teams were scrambling to have him scouted heavily enough to pick him in the first three rounds. He had as much helium as any player in the West.
9 86 Chicago White Sox Brent Morel 3B Cal Poly Calif. $440,000
Scouts liken Morel to former Poly third baseman Josh Lansford offensively, with some home run power but a more effective approach when he tries to go gap-to-gap, and consider him a better defender. Both could squeeze into the first six rounds if they find the right fit.
10 87 Washington Nationals Danny Espinosa SS Long Beach State Calif. $525,000
Espinosa is one of the most distinctive players in college baseball with his strong, mature build and slightly bowlegged "egg beater" running style. Long praised by scouts for his work ethic and hustling style of play, Espinosa gets maximum results out of average tools. One scout compared him to former Cal State Fullerton infielder Justin Turner, though with a bit more athleticism. Defensively, his range is fair and his glove work is unorthodox, but he does possess a strong arm. While he handled shortstop well for Team USA last summer, Espinosa is not a pure shortstop and may be better suited to second base or as a utility player. His intelligent and aggressive baserunning masks raw speed that is only average. A switch-hitter, Espinosa has always been stronger from his natural right side, but improved from the left this year. He takes a wicked cut at anything close, and when he squares a pitch up he can produce screaming drives to all fields. Most scouts want to see more plate discipline and patience from Espinosa, who's considered a streak hitter. His lack of overwhelming tools will keep him out of the first two rounds, but he has a lot of attributes scouts love, including the knack to make those around him better.
11 88 Houston Astros Chase Davidson 1B Milton (Ga.) HS Ga.
Another alum of the East Cobb program, Davidson is a lefthanded-hitting first baseman with a high offensive ceiling. At 6-feet-5, 216 pounds, he has drawn comparisons to Jim Thome with his approach, plus bat speed and leverage in his swing. While Davidson is known for his impressive displays of power in batting practice, he is still somewhat streaky at the plate during games. He has a tendency to pull off balls, swinging and missing more often than desired. When he stays on the ball, however, Davidson has shown the ability to be a doubles and home run machine. In the field, he's regarded by most teams as a first baseman, but could probably play a corner outfield slot as well. Davidson is a below-average runner but is athletic for his size. While he was a standout defensive football player in high school, he'll have to work to become an average defensive player on the baseball diamond and will always be an offense-first player. With a commitment to Georgia, signability could become an issue on draft day.
12 89 Texas Rangers Tim Murphy LHP UCLA Calif. $436,000
In high school and during his first two years at UCLA, Murphy was a two-way prospect who showed promise as a hard-hitting outfielder. He since has established himself as one of the premier college leftys in the nation. Murphy's build is strong and mature, and while not the lanky and projectable type, he is nonetheless a fine athlete--one who played quarterback and safety in high school and was an 11th-round pick in 2005. Scouts also appreciate Murphy's competitive attitude. He displays the ability to wiggle out of tough jams and survives outings in which his stuff is less than optimal. Since starting the season strongly, Murphy has struggled. When sharp, his fastball ranges from 89-92 mph, but dipped to 87 as the season wore on. He does a decent job of moving that pitch around, and has no reservations about challenging hitters with the four-seamer. Murphy's best offering is his mid-to-high 70s curve, an old-fashioned, over-the-top two-plane drop with 11-to-5 break. Murphy is sound mechanically, though a long back stroke in his arm action makes it difficult for him to maintain a consistent release point. His command suffers as a result. Murphy projects comfortably as either a back-of-the-rotation starter or, thanks to his curveball, as a lefthanded set-up man.
13 90 Oakland Athletics Petey Paramore C Arizona State Ariz. $430,000
Paramore was highly regarded coming out of high school but turned down the Mets, who drafted him in the 22nd round in 2005. He became an almost instant starter at Arizona State, where he spent most of his first two seasons sharing time with Kiel Roling as the catcher. Paramore shouldered more of the load in 2008 and earns praise from scouts for his ability to lead a pitching staff, as a quiet receiver and for blocking balls in the dirt. He has good hands but could improve his footwork on his throws. Paramore's arm once rated as above-average, but he's more fringe-average this spring, leaving scouts wondering about his arm's health. Offensively, he has a patient approach with a discerning eye, putting him in frequent hitter's counts, and he should draw his share of walks as a pro. He has some strength but lacks the bat speed to hit for more than fringe-average power. He struggled with wood last summer, going 7-for-63 (.111) for Team USA. Some scouts see many of Jason Varitek's traits in Paramore, though not Varitek's offensive upside. His polish and defensive ability could still get him drafted in the first three rounds.
14 91 St. Louis Cardinals Niko Vasquez SS Durango HS, Las Vegas Nev. $423,000
Vasquez emerged as a potential high draft pick at last summer's Area Code Games as he started turning his raw tools into performance, using his strong hands and good bat speed to blister good velocity. He also showed good defensive tools during a January Under Armour event, with a strong, accurate arm and better hands and actions. However, his season has been wildly inconsistent, starting with an academic suspension in February that cost him a month's worth of games. When he returned, Vasquez was inconsistent defensively, and most scouts see him moving either to third base or second due to his below-average speed and lack of range at shortstop. However, his bat and perceived signability should get him drafted in the first three rounds. A skilled hitter, he has excellent hands and a good swing path, helping him lash line drives from gap to gap. He was at his best when the scouting heat was on this spring. Some scouts want to try him behind the plate, while others think he'll hit enough and has enough arm (it's average at best) to handle third base. His academic issues didn't hinder his Oregon State commitment, but he's considered signable.
15 92 Minnesota Twins Bobby Lanigan RHP Adelphi (N.Y.) N.Y. $417,000
Plenty of scouts in the Northeast prefer Lanigan to Scott Barnes, even though Lanigan is a Division II righthander from a wood-bat conference and Barnes is a Big East lefty. That's a testament to Lanigan's prototypical 6-foot-5 pitcher's frame and quality fastball/slider repertoire, which helped him go 4-4, 1.94 with 87 strikeouts and 16 walks in 79 innings this spring. He's not a great athlete, but he's physical and durable with has a loose arm and an easy delivery. At his best, Lanigan holds the low-90s velocity on his solid-average fastball and touches 93, but a dead arm down the stretch caused him to drop into the 87-89 range. During the course of a game, Lanigan will show plenty of above-average sliders in the 82-86 range, but he'll also leave below-average sliders up in the zone; the pitch grades out as average overall but projects as plus. His changeup has good arm speed, but he seldom used it in college. Lanigan should be drafted in the top five rounds and projects as potential back-of-the-rotation starter.
16 93 Los Angeles Dodgers Kyle Russell OF Texas Texas $410,000
Russell topped NCAA Division I with a school-record 28 homers in 2007, yet that wasn't enough to answer questions about his bat. His poor history with wood bats and his seven-figure asking price dropped him to the Cardinals in the fourth round. When the two sides couldn't come to an agreement, he returned for an up-and-down junior season. Russell hit one homer in March and 12 in April, and scouts still aren't sure his swing and approach will work with wood. He offers power to all fields, though he has been more pull-conscious this spring. He's a decent athlete with a right-field arm, but it's his bat that will have to carry him to the majors. Russell could get drafted in the same area he did a year ago, though it's unlikely anyone will match St. Louis' reported willingness to give him an $800,000 bonus.
17 94 Milwaukee Brewers Logan Schafer OF Cal Poly Calif. $404,000
Outfielder Logan Schafer is one of the Mustangs' safest bets to be drafted. He has average tools across the board. He isn't particularly patient at the plate , but Schafer's athletic ability and raw power from the left side help him stand out. He could squeeze into the first six rounds if they find the right fit.
18 95 Toronto Blue Jays Andrew Liebel RHP Long Beach State Calif. $340,000
Liebel stands as an example of player development at the college level. He made little impact his first two seasons at Long Beach State, working primarily in relief, but emerged toward the end of his junior season as the Dirtbags' most consistent starter. While he's not overpowering, he had taken another step forward this spring even after well-regarding pitching coach Troy Buckley left the Beach to be the Pirates' roving pitching coordinator. Liebel attacks hitters with his fastball, which has solid-average velocity and touches 93 mph. Even though he's small at 5-foot-11 and 195 pounds, he has excellent arm strength due in part to his long-toss program and also to his improved diet and workout program. He also has confidence in his curveball, slider and changeup, all of which grade out as average pitches at times. His command stands out, though, and Liebel is best described as a pitchability college righthander whose biggest downside is his size. At 5-foot-11, he's compared to Yankees righty Ian Kennedy, but he lacks Kennedy's comparatively lengthy track record of success. He's one of the nation's better senior signs and could move quickly.
19 96 Atlanta Braves Craig Kimbrel RHP Wallace State (Ala.) CC Ala. $391,000
Craig Kimbrel leads the list of junior college players in the state. At 6 feet, Kimbrel is an undersized righty with a lightning-quick arm, producing velocity in the mid- to upper 90s. Kimbrel has worked as a starter and closer and profiles to pitch out of the bullpen at the pro level. His slider is still developing as is his command. Kimbrel has overmatched juco hitters this spring, and with each strong performance it became less likely he'd be following though on his commitment to Alabama.
20 97 Chicago Cubs Chris Carpenter RHP Kent State Ohio $385,000
After a couple of false starts, Carpenter's pro career should finally get going this summer. The Tigers made him a seventh-round pick in 2004, but he became the highest-drafted high school pitcher that year to opt for college. He blew out his elbow throwing a 93-mph fastball as a freshman, requiring Tommy John surgery in May 2005 and a second operation in June 2006 to clean out scar tissue. He was surging toward the first round with a strong finish to the regular season last year. But teams wondered about his health and his signability as a draft-eligible sophomore, and no one took a flier until the Yankees popped him in the 18th round. They planned on following him in the Cape Cod League, but he made just two appearances before departing with a tired arm. Carpenter has been healthy all year, topping out at 98 mph and often pitching at 92-96. His hard curveball is tighter and more consistent than it was in 2007, and his command has improved after some early season struggles. His changeup has gotten better too, though he doesn't throw it for strikes as easily he does his main two pitches. At 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, Carpenter has the body to pile up innings--provided he stays healthy. There are clubs that will back away because of his medical history, but he has enhanced his chances of going in the first three rounds by expressing a willingness to sign for slot money.
21 98 Seattle Mariners Aaron Pribanic RHP Nebraska Neb. $390,000
Pribanic showed a strong arm at Hutchinson (Kan.) CC in 2007, but he didn't have enough command or secondary pitches to attract any draft interest. That won't be the case this time around, as Pribanic has shown some of the best stuff among Sunday starters in college baseball. Strong and physical at 6-foot-4 and 200 pounds, he sits at 91-94 mph and tops out at 96 mph with his fastball. His arm works very well and it's fresh, because he redshirted his first year at Hutchinson and has pitched roughly 160 innings since leaving high school four years ago. Pribanic has developed some feel for a splitter that he uses as a changeup. He's still fiddling with both a curveball and a slider, and while they're not reliable, both breaking pitches have decent shape. The curve is the better of the two breaking balls, though it still has a long ways to go. He has thrown more strikes but still has bouts of inconsistency. He loses balance in his delivery, a fixable problem that could lead to further improvements. The grandson of former all-star pitcher Jim Coates, Pribanic won't rush through the minors but could deliver a nice payoff to a team that can clean him up. He was making inroads on the sandwich round at one point, but a late-season slump could knock him down to the third or fourth round.
22 99 Detroit Tigers Scott Green RHP Kentucky Ky. $373,000
Green missed all of 2006 after Tommy John surgery and worked just 18 innings as a redshirt sophomore in 2007, but he positioned himself as a top prospect for 2008 with his performance in the Cape Cod League. The Red Sox, who drafted him in the 15th round, offered him $800,000 at the end of the summer, but Green turned them down in hopes of pitching his way into the first round this spring. That didn't happen because he was so inconsistent that he lost his spot in Kentucky's rotation. While his stuff was expected to take a step forward, Green looked stiff and sat mostly at 87-88 mph as a starter. The sink and armside run on his fastball were more impressive than his velocity. Once he moved to the bullpen, he reached the mid-90s at times, but he did so with a higher arm slot and more effort in his delivery. Green has flashed a good slider at times, but for the most part it has just been a decent pitch. While he has thrown strikes and missed bats, his command has been erratic and made him hittable at times. He still figures to go on the first day of the draft based on his size (6-foot-8, 240 pounds) and the potential he showed on the Cape, but his bonus won't be as high as it could have been last summer.
23 100 New York Mets Kirk Nieuwenhuis OF Azusa Pacific (Calif.) Calif. $360,000
Nieuwenhuis entered the season as BA's top-ranked NAIA prospect after being the Alaska League's player of the year last summer. He's physical at 6-foot-2, 190 pounds, has good arm strength and has pitched at times in his career. He has a strong swing and hit .400 with 15 home runs this spring for Azusa Pacific.
24 101 San Diego Padres Blake Tekotte OF Miami Fla. $361,000
Tekotte plays on a Miami team loaded with impact draft prospects, and he has taken full advantage of the increased exposure. He has been a spark plug for the Hurricanes all season hitting out of the leadoff spot and could fit the same role as a big leaguer. Hitting from the left side, Tekotte puts pressure on the defense with his above-average speed and ability to put the ball in play. He also steals bases--more than 20 this season--and has shown occasional power this spring. Tekotte will also benefit from this being a draft low on college outfielders. He is an above-average college center fielder, and could be average there in the pros despite his below-average arm strength. Tekotte performed well in the Cape Cod League last summer, hitting .256 for Brewster in 43 games. He was subsequently named to the Cape Cod all-star team and earned all-league honors following the season. Tekotte has a good chance to hit for average at the major league level but will most likely be a gap-to-gap hitter with below-average power. His lack of power might leave his bat a bit shy for an everyday regular, and he could settle in as a fourth outfielder.
25 102 Philadelphia Phillies Vance Worley RHP Long Beach State Calif. $355,000
At 6-foot-2, 200 pounds, Worley has a big body and big arm that attracted attention last summer in the Cape Cod League. He wasn't able to carry that success over this spring for the Dirtbags, but teams that saw him good last summer have seen flashes of that this spring. Worley's four-seam fastball sits in the 91-92 mph range, peaking at 93-94. He has struggled at times with his 87-88 mph two-seamer, which gets hammered when left up in the zone. Both fastballs show armside movement, and he will cut the four-seamer at times. Worley mixes in a changeup and curveball. Both need development, and he will drop his arm slot and slow down his arm when delivering the change. Command is the primary concern with Worley, not in terms of walks but in quality of pitches and efficiency, as he frequently finds himself in deep counts. With refinement of his secondary offerings, he could develop into a mid-rotation starter in pro ball, but his power arm makes a conversion to the bullpen a solid option.
26 103 Colorado Rockies Aaron Weatherford RHP Mississippi State Miss. $350,000
Undrafted out of high school, Weatherford's role upon arriving at Mississippi State was unclear. As a freshman he pitched mainly out of the bullpen, totaling two saves, but did make two starts late in the season. He then began his sophomore year as the Bulldog's Friday night starter but moved back to the bullpen after six starts and helped lead the Bulldogs to the College World Series. This season Weatherford has taken on the closer role, and has seemed comfortable there, striking out close to two hitters per inning. He ranks as one of the top closers in an SEC loaded with talented relievers. Even at 6-foot-1, Weatherford has an imposing presence on the mound. His fastball reads between 92-94 mph and comes from a high, over-the-top, arm slot. He throws downhill and commands it to both sides of the plate. He also throws a hard curveball and split-finger with late break. While his split-finger is an out pitch, he rarely throws it for a strike. Weatherford does have durability concerns as he has been plagued with various injuries while a Mississippi State. He has a live arm but has a max-effort delivery, likely limiting him to a relief role as a pro.
27 104 Arizona Diamondbacks Kevin Eichhorn RHP Aptos (Calif.) HS Calif. $500,000
Eichhorn's father Mark spent parts of 11 seasons in the big leagues as a reliever, using a submarine delivery to pitch nearly 300 innings in 1986-87 for the Blue Jays. His son probably won't be a second-round pick, as Mark was back in 1979, but it might take second-round money to keep Kevin from his Santa Clara commitment. Mark helped coach Kevin's team to the 2002 Little League World Series. While the elder Eichhorn was 6-foot-3, 210 pounds during his playing days, the son now checks in at 6-feet, 170 pounds and would benefit from a late growth spurt, which some scouts expect. However, he's athletic and switch-hits, and would probably play shortstop and pitch at Santa Clara. If he's drafted high, it's expected to be for his work on the mound, as he has touched 94 mph with his fastball and shows excellent fastball command. Eichhorn spins a breaking ball as well, a curveball that lacks the power to be a true plus pitch now. His body has some scouts doubting he's ready for pro ball, with a fastball that sits 88-90 mph more often than it touches 94. But his arm works well, and with his athleticism and bloodlines, he's the best prep prospect in Northern California.
28 105 Los Angeles Angels Ryan Chaffee RHP Chipola (Fla.) JC Fla. $338,000
Ryan Chaffee was the winning pitcher for Chipola in the Junior College World Series championship game last season, he broke his ankle in April and had surgery to repair it. Chaffee returned late in the season and pitched a shutout in the Florida junior college tournament, striking out 18 and sending Chipola back to the Junior College World Series. Committed to Louisiana State, Chaffee attacks hitters from multiple arm slots, creating three different breaking balls. He pitches in the low 90s and throws a plus changeup. When healthy and commanding all his pitches, Chaffee is dominant.
29 106 New York Yankees David Adams 2B Virginia Va. $333,000
Ranked as the No. 67 prospect in the 2005 draft by BA, Adams lasted until the 21st round, when the Tigers took him, because of a strong commitment to Virginia. He followed through on the commitment with the expectation that he would be the successor to Ryan Zimmerman at third base, though he has spent most of his time at second instead. After productive freshman and sophomore seasons at Virginia and in the Cape Cod League, Adams seemed to be on his way to possible first-round consideration. But he has had a disappointing junior year, batting .281--more than 100 points lower than his sophomore season. A gap-to-gap hitter with occasional power, Adams profiles as a second baseman at the pro level as well. He's an experienced hitter with an advanced approach and has a good track record of hitting with wood, though he has an unorthodox swing and scouts are unsure if it will play at the next level. In the field, Adams is fairly athletic and has the potential to be average defensively. He's also regarded as a good all-around baseball player with advanced instincts.
30 107 Cleveland Indians Cord Phelps 2B Stanford Calif. $327,000
After Ratliff, Stanford's best position prospect is second baseman Cord Phelps, who offers a strong switch-hitting bat. One scout compared him to Chris Donnels for his upright offensive stance and swing from the left side, and Phelps may move to third base as a pro. He should have enough athletic ability to stay in the middle infield for a while.
31 108 Boston Red Sox Kyle Weiland RHP Notre Dame Ind. $322,000
Weiland has a good chance to go in the first three rounds as a reliever, but he might be starting for Notre Dame if he hadn't fallen and broken his collarbone the December before his sophomore season. After he saved 16 games as a freshman, the Fighting Irish ticketed him for their rotation in 2007. However he had a hard time making the transition to starting while recovering from the injury. Weiland enjoyed immediate success after returning to the bullpen, where he could focus on his 91-94 mph fastball and 80-82 mph slider. He owns school records for single-season and career (25) saves. The slider gives him a second plus pitch at times, though he can fall in love with it too much. Six-foot-3 and 180 pounds, he throws strikes but sometimes battles the location of his pitches in the zone. Weiland's stuff was down slightly a month before the draft, and he hit three batters in one inning against Pittsburgh.