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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 47 Tampa Bay Rays Kyle Lobstein LHP Coconino HS, Flagstaff, Ariz. Ariz. $1,500,000
Lobstein emerged on the summer showcase circuit last year, showing off the cleanest arm and delivery of any starting pitcher in the '08 draft class. BA ranked him as the No. 2 prospect at the Tournament of Stars, where he popped up from under the radar to make USA Baseball's junior national team. He followed that with a turn as the No. 1 prospect at the Area Code Games in Long Beach, and he committed to Arizona as a two-way player. He flashed an average fastball that bumped 92 mph, a promising curveball with great spin and a solid-average circle changeup. His arm still works just as well this spring, and his 6-foot-3, 185-pound athletic frame remains projectable, but Lobstein hasn't dominated inferior northern Arizona competition, and scouts' ardor for him had cooled. His fastball was topping out at 90 mph and usually sitting at 87-88, fringe-average even for a lefthander. Despite his clean arm, his velocity hasn't jumped, and neither of his secondary pitches have been quite as sharp as they were last summer. Several scouts echoed the same phrase for Lobstein: He just hasn't turned the corner. Some scouts wonder if he has enough killer instinct but cautioned that Lobstein could just be pitching to the level of his competition. A team with extra picks is expected to gamble on Lobstein toward the back of the first round or in the supplemental round, but area scouts cautioned that it could take a seven-figure signing bonus to keep Lobstein from pitching (and hitting) for the Wildcats next spring.
2 48 Pittsburgh Pirates Tanner Scheppers RHP Fresno State Calif.
An unsigned pick of the Orioles in 2005 (29th round), Scheppers struggled in his first two years at Fresno State, but showed significant improvement near the end of his sophomore season and has built on that as a consistent starter for the Bulldogs, getting the first chink in his armor in May when he missed a start with a tender shoulder. That came after Scheppers relieved on Friday (touching 99 mph) and then started on Sunday in the same series. Since then he's been diagnosed with a stress fracture in his pitching shoulder. Before the injury, Scheppers' lanky build and spindly legs draw comparisons to former big leaguer Rick Rhoden, and he holds his fastball velocity like a frontline starter, sitting at 92-96 mph at his best with good movement and command. In the past, Scheppers had difficulty commanding his curveball, which has evolved into a power 74-78 mph offering. Generally solid mechanically and athletic, Scheppers will rush his delivery occasionally and fight his command, becoming wild high. With his workable mechanics and terrific stuff, Scheppers has the stuff to be a top of the rotation starter, but it all now depends on his recovery from the stress fracture. He's now the wild card of the 2008 draft.
3 49 Kansas City Royals Johnny Giavotella 2B New Orleans La. $787,000
At 5-foot-8 and 185 pounds, Giovatella is the smallest player on our Top 200 Prospects list, but his bat isn't short. He has hit .348 or better with more walks than strikeouts in each of his three seasons at New Orleans, including an outstanding 48-18 BB-K ratio in the regular season this year. Using a short, compact swing, he waits patiently for pitches he can drive to either of the gaps. He also hit a respectable .255 with wood bats in the Cape Cod League last summer. As an offensive second baseman, he draws comparisons to the likes of Dustin Pedroia (without the same defense), Dan Uggla (without the same power) and Mike Fontenot (with more strength). Giovatella is a solid-average runner who can steal a few bases. He also has arm strength, though he's just an adequate defender at second base. He receives praise for his passion and toughness.
4 50 Baltimore Orioles Xavier Avery OF Cedar Grove HS, Ellenwood, Ga. Ga. $900,000
Athleticism, speed and the unknown are all words coinciding with Avery. This spring he signed to play football as a running back with Georgia. A center fielder, Avery is one of the fastest players in the draft and has been timed at 6.2 seconds in the 60-yard dash. However, Avery is hampered by the poor level of competition on his high school team's schedule, making him a tough player for scouts to evaluate this spring. He was visible last summer and performed well both in the East Cobb league and on the showcase circuit, leading to his being named an Aflac all-American. Avery's tools are thought to be raw, as are his instincts. However, with his speed, he is projected to be an above-average outfielder with an average arm, similar to Carl Crawford. At the plate, Avery's ability is even more of a projection. Hitting lefthanded and having above-average speed will always give Avery a chance to hit for average, but scouts feel he is still a ways away with the bat and his approach. Avery could be an exponential improver with proper instruction and multiple at-bats in the minor leagues.
5 51 Philadelphia Phillies Anthony Gose OF Bellflower (Calif.) HS Calif. $772,000
Gose has perhaps the strongest left arm of any Southern California high school pitching prospect since Bill Bordley, a first-round pick in the mid 1970s. However, his small stature and a recent bout of rotator cuff tendinitis have his draft status in doubt. Gose's blistering fastball ranges from 92-96 mph, peaking at 97. Both his frame and four-seam fastball draw legitimate comparisons to both Scott Kazmir and Billy Wagner. In professional baseball, Gose will need to improve and sharpen both his 77 mph curve and 75 mph changeup. Gose profiles as a lefthanded closer or set-up man, since he loses significant velocity as a game progresses. He'll also need to clean up his mechanics and learn to slow down his frantic pace. Scouts are currently awaiting results on another MRI of Gose's shoulder; one in mid-April showed no fracture or labrum tear. After starting several games early in the season, Gose was restricted to DH duty for much of the spring. As with so many young hurlers, high pitch counts and year-round play add to injury concerns with Gose. When he's healthy or when he's not pitching, Gose plays center field, with plus-plus speed and arm being his best tools. He's aggressive on the bases with a knack for stealing bags, taking the extra base, and flying into bases with a head-first slide. However, Gose has never consistently shown enough hitting ability to convince scouts he can hit professional pitching. Severe doubts about his bat make it most likely that Gose will be drafted and signed as a pitcher.
6 52 Florida Marlins Brad Hand LHP Chaska (Minn.) HS Minn. $760,000
Hand has created a bigger sensation among scouts than any Minnesota high school prospect since Joe Mauer. He won't go at the top of the draft like Mauer did, but Hand performed very well when two dozen scouts attended his fourth start of the spring. His fastball ranged from 88-93 mph with nice life, and both his curveball and changeup flashed plus potential. Hand is an athletic 6-foot-2, 205-pounder who also plays football and hockey, and in baseball he doubles as a first baseman with lefty power. The biggest issues with him are his mechanics and his signability. He has violence and a head whack in his delivery, and he lands on a stiff front leg. Hand has pitched himself into third-round consideration, but that the slot bonuses in that area of the draft (roughly $275,000 to $400,000) may not be enough to lure him away from an Arizona State scholarship. The Twins usually stay on top of their homestate prospects, and they could be tempted to take him with a sandwich or second-round choice.
7 53 Milwaukee Brewers Seth Lintz RHP Highland HS, Gilbert, Ariz. Tenn. $900,000
Lintz sprouted to 6-foot-2 after a senior year growth spurt of close to three inches, and his fastball increased from the mid-80s to low-90s. His draft stock has jumped as well. He has been seen up to 94 mph and also possesses a power slider. Coming at hitters from a three-quarters arm slot, Lintz offers a fastball with late arm-side tail and sink. He is projectable and still growing into his strong-framed body. Command issues are a concern with Lintz, but that could be due to his getting acclimated with his new height and arm slot. A good student, graduating second in his high school class, Lintz is committed to Kentucky. He is now considered the second-best high school pitcher in Tennessee behind Sonny Gray but could be the first of the two drafted, due in part to Gray's injury. Lintz is projected as a starter in the big leagues and is thought to have good makeup.
8 54 Milwaukee Brewers Cutter Dykstra OF Westlake HS, Westlake Village, Calif. Calif. $737,000
Dykstra is a righthanded version of his dad, former major leaguer Len Dykstra, who starred with the Mets and Phillies in the 1980s and 90s. The younger Dykstra is a terrific athlete, finishing first in the SPARQ testing at the 2007 Area Code games in Long Beach and running the 60 in 6.58 seconds. An offense-first prospect, he uses his speed aggressively. He has a balanced stance at the plate and can hammer pitches middle in. He has outstanding power for a player his size, and his excellent bat speed produces both line-drive and loft power. While his frame is strong, well developed and athletic, Dykstra has little physical projection. Of greater concern with Dykstra is defense, as he's moved from shortstop to center field. He's not a natural fit at either spot with an adequate arm. The UCLA signee had late helium and could go in the first three rounds.
9 55 Washington Nationals Destin Hood OF St. Paul's Episcopal HS, Mobile, Ala. Ala. $1,100,000
Hood showed his raw power and lightning-quick bat speed when he tied for the home run derby title at the Aflac Classic last fall. Raw and electric are two words scouts use to describe Hood. He has four raw tools but each with above-average projection. An exceptional athlete with a combination of strength and speed, Hood is signed to play football (wide receiver) and baseball at Alabama. At the plate, Hood has bat speed and raw power to rival anyone in this draft class, but his hit tool is currently lacking as he often swings and misses. A shortstop in high school, Hood will most definitely be moved to the outfield due to his below-average arm strength. He is a plus runner, and although his instincts are under-developed, could be an average defender in the future. The team that drafts Hood will believe in his ability to eventually hit. Upon reaching high ceiling, Hood projects as a middle of the order impact bat.
10 56 Houston Astros Jay Austin OF North Atlanta HS, Atlanta Ga. $715,000
A teammate of Avery in the East Cobb League, Austin is an athletic outfielder in a draft short on players of his mold. A center fielder with above-average speed and a lefthanded swing, Austin has scouts intrigued with his potential to be a five-tool player at the big league level. He has added power to his game this spring after physically maturing and incorporating his lower half more into his swing. He has plus bat speed and has shown ability to make consistent contact at the high school level. The team that drafts him will be betting that Austin will continue to hit into the pros as the other tools needed are present. Austin can even throw 90 mph off the mound, giving him a plus arm in the outfield. He is still somewhat raw but has a ceiling and would be a great pick for a team with multiple selections early in the draft.
11 57 Texas Rangers Robbie Ross LHP Lexington (Ky.) Christian Academy Ky. $1,575,000
Kentucky offers its best draft crop ever this year, and its high school class is especially deep with four prospects with the talent to go in the top two rounds. The best of that contingent is Ross, a lefty with pitches and polish. He sits at 90-92 mph and touched 94 with his fastball, and his secondary pitches and command are just as impressive. He shows a hard slider and nice feel for a changeup, and he pounds the strike zone. The only knock on Ross is that he's just 6 feet tall, but he generates his quality stuff via athleticism and arm speed, rather than effort. Scouts eagerly anticipated his late-April matchup with fellow Lexington southpaw Nick Maronde, and Ross didn't disappoint. He struck out 14 and walked none, giving up just an unearned run while dealing Maronde the second loss of his prep career. He also outdueled Niceville (Fla.) lefty Brett DeVall earlier in the year, ending the game with a 94-mph fastball for a strikeout. A Kentucky recruit, Ross should be signable in the first two rounds.
12 58 Oakland Athletics Tyson Ross RHP California Calif. $694,000
Yet another NorCal Baseball alum, Ross stepped into California's weekend rotation as a freshman and has filled the Friday role for two years. He also pitched well for Team USA last summer and was the team's most consistent pitcher. His velocity was down during the summer in the mid-to-upper 80s, and has been erratic again this spring. He was at his best against Stanford in a May victory, touching 96 mph and sitting in the low 90s. Moreover, Ross worked off his fastball and used his changeup effectively against the Cardinal in a start that may convince teams to leave him as a starter. His best pitch is a plus slider thrown in the low-80s with short, hard break. At times it has two-plane break, and it's such a good pitch and he locates it so well that at times he throws it far too often, working off the slider instead of his fastball. The biggest question on Ross is his mechanics. His stride is exceptionally short for a pitcher his size (6-foot-5, 220 pounds), leading to stress on his arm and a lack of extension to finish off pitches down in the zone. Also, his arm action is short in the back, and it may be difficult to "fix" all those issues. Some scouts believe that would do more harm than good, though, and would send him to the bullpen as a pro to use that slider as a weapon.
13 59 St. Louis Cardinals Shane Peterson OF Long Beach State Calif. $683,000
Peterson is the top prospect on a talent-laden Long Beach State squad which could have six players drafted in the first 10 rounds. Peterson's strong, mature body and outstanding hitting performance this year, following up an excellent showing in the Cape Cod League last summer, should make him the first Dirtbag drafted. One of the most versatile players in the nation, the lefthanded Peterson has the ability to play first, pitch (90 mph off the mound) or hold down a corner outfield spot. He's above-average defensively at first but should run enough (though he's below-average) to hold down a corner outfield spot. Peterson's hitting mechanics are a bit out of the ordinary, as he's a front-foot hitter, but he generates excellent bat speed and has a high finish that helps give him loft power. An admirably consistent hitter, Peterson can hammer the ball to all fields, and has cleared the deep center-field fence at Blair Field, one of the stingiest D-1 hitter's parks in the country. Peterson slumps only when he chases the high inside fastball, or when he becomes too pull oriented and flies his head and front side open. Statistically-inclined clubs will jump on Peterson, who was leading the Big West Conference in on-base percentage (.495) and ranked second in slugging. While not a prospect on the level of recent Long Beach State hitters like Troy Tulowitzki and Evan Longoria, Peterson is a legitimate first-two-rounds candidate and has enough bat to be a regular at a corner position.
14 60 Minnesota Twins Tyler Ladendorf SS Howard (Texas) JC Texas $673,000
Ladendorf has put up the gaudiest numbers in junior college baseball over the last two seasons. As a freshman, he hit .425 and led all national juco players with 65 steals in as many attempts. This year, he has become more of a power threat, topping the juco batting race with a .542 average thru mid-May and throwing in 16 homers (up from one a year ago) and 31 steals in 32 tries. The best juco prospect in the draft, Ladendorf would have signed for $200,000 in 2007. The Yankees offered him $150,000 as a draft-and-follow, while the Giants proposed a $190,000 bonus after taking him in the 34th round. Ladendorf is bigger and stronger than he was last year, and he now carries 210 pounds on his 6-foot-2 frame. Scouts aren't sure if he truly has more than gap power, but they like him as a multitooled shortstop. He has shortened his swing and can flash plus-plus speed when he's not playing on cruise control. Defensively, he has good hands and plenty of arm despite having the labrum in his throwing shoulder disintegrate as the result of a high school injury. A team that buys into Ladendorf's entire package could take him in the sandwich round.
15 61 Los Angeles Dodgers Josh Lindblom RHP Purdue Ind. $663,000
The highest-drafted player from 2005 who still has yet to turn pro, Lindblom turned down $300,000 as a third-round pick of the Astros. After spending one year at Tennessee and two at Purdue, he'll likely go one round higher this June. Lindblom scuffled as a starter before the Boilermakers made him a reliever late in the season. Now that he no longer has to pace himself, Lindblom throws at 94-95 mph with heavy life as he goes full bore for one or two innings. His hard curveball has improved, and he has quickened his delivery as well. He also mixes in an occasional splitter. Lindblom throws strikes but works out of a higher arm slot, making his pitches easier to see and more hittable than they seemingly should be. He has a resilient arm and workhorse build at 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds, but his stuff has been so much more electric out of the pen, suggesting that is his best role as a pro.
16 62 Milwaukee Brewers Cody Adams RHP Southern Illinois Ill. $653,000
Adams hasn't been as good or as consistent as he was in 2007, when he won 11 games as a sophomore, but he has showed arm strength every time out, which will get him drafted somewhere from the third to fifth round. He operates in the low 90s, tops out at 96 and will show some 93s and 94s in the late innings. He throws strikes easily, but he hasn't been more dominant because his mechanics have been off. Six-foot-2 and 180 pounds, he overstrides and pitches uphill, flattening out his pitches and leaving them up in the strike zone. His slider hasn't been very effective, leaving his changeup as his most reliable No. 2 option. Whoever signs him will try to get him to stay on top of his pitches and stride more directly to the plate. He may move to the bullpen, where he could show even more velocity.
17 63 Toronto Blue Jays Kenny Wilson OF Sickles HS, Tampa Fla. $644,000
An athlete, Wilson's best tool is his above-average running ability. He gets out of the box and down the line right at four seconds and is a true base stealing threat. Wilson is a gap-to-gap hitter with below-average power, using his speed to put pressure on the defense. In the outfield, Wilson is an above average defender. Committed to Florida, Wilson may be a tough sign.
18 64 Atlanta Braves Tyler Stovall LHP Hokes Bluff (Ala.) HS Ala. $750,000
The top high school pitching prospect from Alabama, Stovall is a projectable lefthander who has dominated competition. Stovall set the Alabama state record for wins (18) and strikeouts (227) in 2007, and he already had 12 wins and 170 strikeouts this season. He is a U.S. Junior National Team alum and is committed to play at Auburn. While his fastball sits between 89-91 mph, Stovall's go-to pitch is his curveball. He also has an advanced changeup. While his curveball is a plus pitch, he sometimes uses it too often. Scouts would like to see Stovall pitch more off his fastball, and if he doesn't, scouts could see him settling into merely a setup or relief role as a pro. However, with added velocity and reliance on his fastball, Stovall could be a starter in the big leagues. His makeup is a plus, and academically, he will graduate at the top of his high school class.
19 65 Chicago Cubs Aaron Shafer RHP Wichita State Kan. $625,000
Shafer had established himself as one of the premier pitching prospects for the 2008 draft midway through the 2007 season. Then he strained his elbow, which didn't require surgery but sidelined him for a month. His fastball hasn't been the same since. Shafer used to work from 91-94 mph with his fastball and now ranges from 88-91 mph. The diminished velocity hasn't made him less effective, however. His effortless delivery allows his heater to get on hitters quickly, and it enables him to live in the bottom of the strike zone. He has above-average command of his fastball, 12-to-6 curveball and changeup. Shafer has a solid 6-foot-4, 205-pound frame and his arm has been healthy since tweaking his elbow. He's no longer a candidate for the first round, but he could go in the second or third.
20 66 Seattle Mariners Dennis Raben OF Miami Fla. $616,000
Lefthanded power hitters are always in demand, and with this draft class being low on quality college outfielders, Raben satisfies two areas of desire. A 49th-round draft pick by the Mariners in 2005, Raben chose to attend Miami and helped lead the Hurricanes to the College World Series as a freshman. Following his sophomore year, Raben played in the Cape Cod League for Orleans, hitting six home runs and earning all-Cape Cod League honors. A preseason All-American, Raben was recognized as one of the top hitting outfield prospects in the upcoming draft. Raben has a strong build at 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds. He is aggressive at the plate and can often times get caught chasing pitches out of the zone. His swing has some length, but Raben has tremendous power that translates to the game. In the outfield, he is a below-average runner but does have good instincts and takes proper routes. However, Raben could be moved to first base at some point in his professional career.
21 67 Detroit Tigers Cody Satterwhite RHP Mississippi Miss. $606,000
Satterwhite has been a confusing prospect for scouts since his high school days in Jackson, Miss. Blessed with a first-round arm and electric stuff, Satterwhite has made a reputation for being a projectable righthander with at least three above-average pitches but with inconsistent command and lacking pitchability. At 6-foot-4, and 205 pounds, Satterwhite has the ideal pitcher's body. As a starter, his fastball stays between 90-93 mph, but as a reliever he consistently throws between 95-98. He has done both for Ole Miss since opting not to sign with the Indians after being drafted in the 37th round of the 2005 draft. After pitching primarily as a reliever in his sophomore season, Satterwhite was selected to the U.S. National Team. This season, the Rebels put Satterwhite back in the starting rotation where he has not been as successful. Scouts believe Satterwhite will eventually end up back in the bullpen once he reaches the pros. To complement his fastball, Satterwhite offers a curveball, changeup and hard slider. He has the ability to flash all three as plus pitches but with little consistency. Due to his delivery, Satterwhite has a tendency to leave pitches up in the zone causing his fastball to become hittable and his breaking balls to flatten out. Satterwhite is lightning in a bottle as if he ever figures out how to harness his natural ability and he could quickly be an impact pitcher in the big leagues.
22 68 New York Mets Javier Rodriguez OF Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, Gurabo, P.R. P.R. $585,000
Considered one of the better prospects in Puerto Rico heading into the Excellence Tournament that annually draws scouts to see the island's best talent each May, Rodriguez elevated his status after his strong showing there. He is the best pure hitter from Puerto Rico and has good bat speed. With a lean, athletic body, Rodriguez should have the ability to add muscle to his long frame. He shows above-average raw power to the pull side, though there is some length to his swing. Rodriguez is an average to above-average runner, clocking in at 6.7 seconds in the 60-yard dash. Reviews of his fielding are mixed, though his arm is above-average for both the length and carry he gets on the ball and for its accuracy.
23 69 San Diego Padres James Darnell 3B South Carolina S.C. $740,000
Teaming up with Havens and Smoak at South Carolina, Darnell was the third piece of one of the most potent infields in college baseball. The best athlete of the three, Darnell has potential to be a five-tool talent in the pros. At 6-foot-2 and 210 pounds, Darnell is a physical specimen with a combination of athleticism and strength. Still somewhat raw as a baseball player, it is still to be determined which position he will play at the professional level. Darnell has an above-average arm but may not have the hands to stay at third base. His above-average footspeed may make him a better candidate for right field. At the plate, consistency is Darnell's red flag. He is known for going through hot-and-cold stretches. He has above-average raw power as he hit 19 home runs last year and has hit three home runs in a game multiple times this season. He has power to all fields but is known more as a pull hitter. Darnell also has shown ability to hit for average as he led the Gamecocks with a .331 batting average in 2007. Darnell's cold spells come when he goes through stretches of chasing breaking balls and changeups out of the zone.
24 70 Atlanta Braves Zeke Spruill RHP Kell HS, Marietta, Ga. Ga. $600,000
Another Georgia native with the benefit of displaying his skills in the East Cobb League, Spruill impressed scouts last summer and has continued the trend this spring. Spruill has a fluid delivery that is clean and repeatable. He has been up to 93 mph and pitches at 91-92. His fastball has life with sink and is a plus pitch. Commanding all three pitches, Spruill also throws a curveball with slurvy action and a changeup. At 6-foot-4 and 184 pounds, Spruill has a pitcher's body with athleticism and projection. Scouts feel he could pitch closer to 93-94 by the time he reaches the big leagues. A Georgia commit, Spruill is known as a competitor and a winner with plus makeup. Spruill, along with Martin, has separated himself as one of the top two high school pitching prospects in Georgia.
25 71 Philadelphia Phillies Jason Knapp RHP North Hunterdon HS, Annandale, N.J. N.J. $590,000
There is no scouting consensus on righthander Jason Knapp. Some scouts believe he's the top prospect in the Garden State, destined to throw 100 mph in the big leagues, while other scouts see nothing more than arm strength--and one even called him "the most overrated guy in New Jersey." Late in the spring, Knapp was pitching at 94-96 mph in short relief outings, and he could add velocity thanks to his loose arm and projectable 6-foot-5 frame, which started to shed some baby fat this spring. But the rest of Knapp's stuff needs work, as so does his delivery. He tries to throw a three-quarters curveball from a lower arm slot that might be better suited for a slider, but the pitch shows decent depth from time to time. His changeup is also a work in progress but has good arm speed and fade. Knapp has fundamental flaws in his delivery, yet for all that, he could go in the top three rounds--or even rocket into the first round--if a club falls in love with his upside. Like Quinton Miller, he's committed to North Carolina but is considered an easier sign.
26 72 Colorado Rockies Charlie Blackmon OF Georgia Tech Ga. $563,000
Blackmon has been drafted twice before, by the Marlins out of high school in 2004 (28th round) and then by the Red Sox in 2005 after his freshman year at Young Harris (Ga.) JC (20th round). In both cases he was taken as a lefthander, but after transferring to Georgia Tech he didn't see any time on the mound, and he redshirted in 2007. Blackmon played in the Texas Collegiate League last summer and batted .316 as an outfielder, so when he returned to Georgia Tech he got a chance as a position player and took full advantage. In his first year as a hitter, Blackmon has led the Yellow Jackets in batting and was among the team leaders in nearly every offensive category. A natural athlete, Blackmon has five tools that are quickly gaining refinement. At 6-foot-3, 200 pounds, he has the prototypical pro body. He runs well and could play any of the three outfield positions but probably fits best in left. At the plate, Blackmon has a natural lefthanded swing and makes consistent contact. While his approach is still raw, he projects to hit for power and average. He's a college senior but a young hitter, so he has plenty of room for improvement. He is one of the biggest sleepers in this year's draft.
27 73 Arizona Diamondbacks Bryan Shaw RHP Long Beach State Calif. $553,000
Long Beach State righted itself after a rough midseason patch, and Shaw had been key to the turnaround as the team's power closer. He's from Livermore, Calif., which seems to churn out hard throwers. It's the hometown of Randy Johnson and Giants reliever Erick Threets. While both of those hard-throwing lefties have touched 100 mph in their careers, Shaw touches 95-96 mph and sits in the 92-94 range. His slider can be a real power breaking ball when he's going well, sitting in the low to mid-80s. While he's just 6-foot-1, he does a good job of missing down and keeping the ball in the ballpark. Shaw also has excellent control for a power pitcher. His stuff might be short to be a big league closer, but he should move quickly into a setup role.
28 74 Los Angeles Angels Tyler Chatwood RHP Redlands (Calif.) East Valley HS Calif. $547,000
Many scouts balk at Chatwood's shorter (5-foot-11), mature and non-projectable frame. His arm and tools, however, are hard to dismiss. Most scouts prefer him as a pitcher, and it's easy to see why. Chatwood's fastball sits in the 90-93 mph range, peaking at 94-95. He'll need to develop his 82 mph change, but Chatwood's curve is already a plus pitch, a 72-74 mph multi-plane kneebuckler that is easily his best offering. Many scouts see Chatwood as a somewhat smaller version of Roy Oswalt. In the past, Chatwood has dabbled in the infield, but his hands don't work well there. As an outfielder, he has a well-above-average arm and impressive 6.7 speed. Inconsistent at bat throughout the summer and fall showcase and scout ball season, Chatwood has now developed into a terror at the plate, showing both hitting ability and provocative power. If he makes it to UCLA, where he's committed, he should be a true two-way threat.
29 75 New York Yankees Scott Bittle RHP Mississippi Miss.
Taken by the Yankees in the 48th round of last year's draft, Bittle elected not to sign and transferred to Ole Miss this season from Northwest Texas CC. He was thrown into the closer's role for the Rebels and has dominated SEC hitters all season, putting up Nintendo type numbers. He has tallied an almost 5 to 1 K/BB ratio, striking out close to two batters per inning pitched. Uncharacteristic for a closer, Bittle's fastball is just an average pitch, with velocity between the 88-91 mph range. However, Bittle pitches mainly off his cut fastball--a devastating late breaking pitch in the mid-80s that has two-plane movement similar to a slider. Bittle is able to command this pitch down in the zone and creates a ton of swings and misses by starting it just above the knees and having it drop just below the strike-zone. He also effectively mixes in a changeup, freezing unsuspecting hitters. At 6-foot-1, 212 pounds, and without an above-average fastball, Bittle does not fit the typical closer's profile in the major leagues. He will most likely be a long relief or setup man in the pros. Once signed, he should move quickly as his command and stuff are close to major league ready.
30 76 Cleveland Indians Trey Haley RHP Central Heights HS, Nacogdoches, Texas Texas $1,250,000
Earlier in the spring, Haley had a chance to be the first pitcher drafted out of Texas. He generated buzz by touching 95 mph with projection remaining in his 6-foot-4, 190-pound frame. He couldn't sustain that velocity when crosscheckers and scouting directors came in to see him, usually pitching at 91-92 mph in the first inning before sitting at 88-89 mph. He tends to overthrow, putting a lot of effort and a head jerk into his delivery when he does. He flashes a promising curveball and a changeup, but he's not consistent. He struggles to repeat his mechanics, which affects his control and command. Like many of the most promising high school pitchers in Texas this spring, Haley will be difficult to sign. It may take first-round money to lure him away from Rice, and the difference between his present and his future is too great for clubs to make that kind of investment.
31 77 Boston Red Sox Derrik Gibson SS Seaford (Del.) HS Del. $600,000
Gibson didn't make a national splash until last summer on the showcase circuit. He had an impressive showing at the Perfect Game National Showcase last June but really made a name for himself by finishing strong in the fall and committing to North Carolina. An athletic middle infielder who could also play center field, Gibson's evaluations are still based on projection. Playing in Delaware, he is still raw in the field and at the plate but has the athleticism and tools to make him a premium player. Now he looks like a leadoff hitter with a line-drive stroke and above-average speed. But if his thin, 6-foot-1 frame fills out, Gibson could have a chance to hit for average power. In the field, he moves well and has good hands, but his throwing motion has a hitch in it and needs refinement. While he may be too raw for a team to buy him out of his commitment to UNC, Gibson should be an immediate contributor in college and a top-level prospect in three years.