Round

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Pick Overall Team Player Position School State Bonus
1 31 Minnesota Twins Shooter Hunt RHP Tulane La. $1,080,000
Hunt has been impossible to hit all spring for Tulane in trying to lead the Green Wave back to regionals, limiting opponents to a .144 average while averaging 12.2 strikeouts per nine innings through 12 starts. Batters just can't put the barrel on his lively fastball, which sits at 91-92 mph and tops out at 94, or his hard breaking ball, which features curveball break and slider velocity. A full-time catcher until his junior year in high school, Hunt still is learning the nuances of pitching. He nibbles at the corners and often pitches away from contact rather than attacking hitters. As a result, he had allowed more walks (42) than hits (38) this spring. A sturdy 6-foot-3, 200-pounder, Hunt should be more than capable of handling the demands of starting in pro ball. His biggest adjustment will be learning to trust his stuff so he can keep his pitch counts down. He flashes a plus changeup in the bullpen, though he doesn't use it much in games. He led the Cape Cod League in strikeouts after his freshman season, which he spent at Virginia. Hunt could go as high as No. 7 to the Reds, but more likely fits in the middle of the first round.
2 32 Milwaukee Brewers Jake Odorizzi RHP Highland (Ill.) HS Ill. $1,060,000
Scouts have flocked to see Odorizzi this spring, and some teams have rated the athletic righthander as the top high school pitcher in the draft. After pitching at 90-91 mph last summer, he has kicked his fastball up to 91-93 mph with consistent armside run this spring. A half-dozen scouting directors witnessed a May start in which he sat at 92-93 mph in the late innings. Odorizzi operates with a clean delivery that he repeats well, and the ball comes out of his hand so easily that his fastball appears even quicker. The teams that believe in him like his slider, while others think it needs more refinement. An outstanding athlete at 6-foot-3 and 180 pounds, Odorizzi is also a star shortstop with speed and power, but his future is definitely on the mound. He also excels in football as an all-conference wide receiver, though he missed part of his senior season after spraining a knee ligament. That's the only ding on his medical record, and it's not a concern. It's anticipated that he'll forego a Louisville scholarship once he's drafted somewhere between the mid-first and second rounds.
3 33 New York Mets Brad Holt RHP UNC Wilmington N.C. $1,040,000
Holt emerged this spring as the ace of a surging Seahawks baseball team. His fastball has improved since arriving in Wilmington and now sits between 92-94 mph, touching 96. Not only does he have a big arm, but he is able to maintain his velocity deep into games. However, the major difference between this year's Holt from the past is his vastly improved command. Holt at 6-foot-4, 195 pounds, has a perfect pro body with a clean delivery and a first-round arm. He is coordinated and athletic on the mound, attacking hitters with his fastball. The only thing holding him back is the lack of a usable secondary pitch. He offers a slider with loose spin and tends to slow his body and arm down when throwing it. Even though his secondary stuff is in need of refinement, teams will not walk away from the pro body, strong arm and life on the fastball.
4 34 Philadelphia Phillies Zach Collier OF Chino Hills (Calif.) HS Calif. $1,020,000
Collier was not selected to participate in the 2007 Area Code Games or the Aflac Classic, but he's had a high profile nonetheless. He started to generate buzz during the local Connie Mack summer season as a teammate of Isaac Galloway and Aaron Hicks. Rave reviews from parents and youth coaches began to filter down to scouts, and Collier helped his cause with strong showings in two showcase events held at the MLB Urban Youth Academy in Compton. He continued gaining ground this spring, and then moved into first-round consideration when he took a Hicks 93 mph fastball deep during a tournament game in Fullerton. To make sure the 40-plus scouts in attendance were paying attention, Collier ripped two more hits. Lefthanded all the way, Collier has an athletic and projectable 6-foot-2, 195-pound outfielder's frame. His above-average speed makes him a threat as a baserunner and permits him to patrol center field for now. As he slows down and matures physically, he'll play an outfield corner, and his average arm makes right field a possibility. Collier had a surgical procedure to improve blood flow to his heart, performed in May 2006, which may be a concern for some clubs, but he's been medically cleared for two years and has had no problems. Collier's hitting ability and solid all-around game had him moving up boards, possibly in the middle of the first round.
5 35 Milwaukee Brewers Evan Frederickson LHP San Francisco Calif. $1,010,000
Frederickson was climbing draft charts late as he put together a pair of his strongest starts of the year to finish the season. Several scouts were on hand as he battled San Diego's Brian Matusz in his penultimate start, and Frederickson struck out 11 in seven shutout innings of his last outing, against Dallas Baptist. Some scouts say Frederickson, at an imposing 6-foot-6, 238 pounds, has better stuff than Dons lefty Aaron Poreda, the White Sox's 2007 first-round pick. They both have lower arm slots, and while Frederickson doesn't reach the high 90s as Poreda can, he does have a plus fastball, touching 95 and at times sitting in the 91-93 range. His slider gives him a weapon Poreda never had; it's a power pitch, a hybrid slurve that has some depth and is thrown in the low 80s. When it's on, he makes lefthanded hitters look bat. Command is never going to be Frederickson's forte, and he flirts with having "the thing" at times; he was awful (6.99 ERA) in his first two seasons at Virginia Tech before finding the plate more under the tutelage of San Francisco pitching coach Greg Moore, though his delivery still has flaws. Scouts view him as a reliever, but perhaps more than just a lefty setup man. He could go as high as the second round.
6 36 Kansas City Royals Mike Montgomery LHP Hart HS, Newhall, Calif. Calif. $988,000
With Anthony Gose battling shoulder tendonitis, Montgomery has emerged as the top high school lefthander in an unusually deep and talented Southern California crop. He's a Cal State Fullerton recruit who would benefit by studying under coach Dave Serrano, but his strong spring likely means he won't make it to college. That was despite some makeup questions about the athletic Montgomery, who was kicked off the Hart High basketball team for racking up too many technical fouls. Montgomery was the team's top scorer at 20 points per game, and at 6-foot-4 and 180 pounds, he has a long, athletic build that attracts scouts. So does his fastball, which sits in the 88-92 mph range and peaks at 94. His high quality secondary offerings include a sharp, if slow, 71-72 mph curveball and a 79-81 mph changeup with sudden late drop. Montgomery will need to correct a series of subtle mechanical deficiencies that tend to impede his command, but when those problems are solved, he profiles as a middle-of-the-rotation starter. He was rising up draft boards as June approached as he showed a feel for pitching, rather than trying to just blow high school hitters way. He does an excellent job of mixing pitches, changing speeds, setting hitters up and finishing them off.
7 37 San Francisco Giants Conor Gillaspie 3B Wichita State Kan. $970,000
Though he turned in productive freshman and sophomore seasons at Wichita State, Gillaspie didn't really break out as a prospect until he won the MVP award in the Cape Cod League last summer. He added the batting (.345) and slugging titles (.673) as well. He has posted similar numbers for the Shockers as a junior, consistently squaring up balls on the barrel of his bat and controlling the strike zone. As a pro, he projects to hit for a high average, with much of his power coming in the form of doubles rather than home runs. He gets high marks for his intensity and his work ethic, as he constantly strives to improve his game. He's an underrated athlete and baserunner who used his aggressiveness and instincts to tie for the NCAA Division I lead with eight triples going into the final week of the regular season. Gillaspie has no more than decent range and has been erratic at third base this spring, but he should be able to stick at the hot corner in pro ball. His hands are soft and arm strength is average, and he makes the routine plays. Clubs have varying opinions on Gillaspie, with some viewing him as a late first-round talent and others as more of a second-rounder.
8 38 Houston Astros Jordan Lyles RHP Hartsville (S.C.) HS S.C. $930,000
Lyles leads the South Carolina high school ranks. Blessed with a clean and easy delivery, Lyles offers a fastball in the upper 80s and can break 90 mph on occasion. He also has room in his 6-foot-4 frame to add strength and velocity. Lyles also throws a curveball and changeup and can command all three pitches. A three-sport star in high school, Lyles is athletic on the mound. He is committed to South Carolina.
9 39 St. Louis Cardinals Lance Lynn RHP Mississippi Miss. $938,000
Lynn is somewhat the opposite of his Ole Miss teammate Cody Satterwhite. At 6-foot-5 and 250 pounds, Lynn is described as a big-bodied and durable starter who consistently produces quality starts game in and game out. None of the pitches in his repertoire are overwhelming, but he possesses three average to fringe-average offerings. His fastball is typically between 90-92 mph, and his slider comes in around 81 mph. He also throws a curveball and changeup, both of which are fringe-average at best. Lynn mixes all four pitches with command and pitchability, making him a safe bet to be a fourth or fifth starter and an innings-eater in the major leagues within a few years. Lynn was drafted by the Mariners in the sixth round of the 2005 draft and should improve on that this year. Lynn pitched for the U.S. National Team last summer, striking out 26 batters in 25 innings and compiling a 2-1,1.80 mark in four starts. While never stellar, scouts are impressed with his undeniable track record of success.
10 40 Atlanta Braves Brett DeVall LHP Niceville (Fla.) HS Fla. $1,000,000
From Florida, a Team USA Junior Olympic team alum and a participant in the East Cobb League, Devall has been on the scouting radar for a long time. DeVall was an Aflac All-American in the fall and has distinguished himself this spring as the top pure high school lefthander in this draft. DeVall, at 6-foot-4, has the ideal pitcher's build and has an advanced understanding of how to pitch. His delivery and arm action are sound as he repeats his mechanics, leading to his plus command of three pitches. The velocity on his fastball typically stays between 88-89 mph but can touch the low 90s. His curveball has the makings of an average pitch at the very least and his changeup is advanced for a high school pitcher. While he has feel for each of his three pitches, none of them is presently labeled as an out pitch. DeVall is projected as a third or fourth starter at the big league level. With the development of a plus breaking ball or an increase in velocity on his fastball, DeVall could be a No. 2 guy in a major league rotation. He is committed to play baseball for Georgia.
11 41 Chicago Cubs Ryan Flaherty SS Vanderbilt Tenn. $906,000
As a coach's son, Flaherty earns compliments as a "ballplayer" from opposing coaches and scouts. His father Edward Flaherty is in the ABCA Hall of Fame and has won two national championships as head coach of Division III Southern Maine's baseball team. Flaherty himself has a track record of winning, as following his senior year in high school, his summer team won the American Legion national championship. Flaherty was also named Mr. Baseball in Maine the same season. At Vanderbilt, Flaherty took over the starting shortstop role full-time his sophomore season. However, scouts feel Flaherty's range is not good enough for him to stay at the premium position into the pros, and he will most likely have to make a move to second base, which he played for Team USA last summer. At the plate, Flaherty swings from the left side and will hit for average. He holds the Commodores record for longest hitting streak at 35 games. Flaherty hit six total home runs in his first two years on campus and has close to doubled that total this season. He has showed signs of filling out his lanky 6-foot-3 frame and more strength is projected, but he will most likely never be considered a power hitter. His athleticism and makeup are a plus and should carry him into the major leagues.
12 42 San Diego Padres Jaff Decker OF Sunrise Mountain HS, Peoria, Ariz. Ariz. $892,000
Decker looks like a younger version of Matt Stairs with a compact, strong body, and he's earned comparisons to the Canadian slugger as well, though Decker throws lefthanded. Scouts mean the comparison as a compliment, because Decker can really hit. The best thing about being a 5-foot-10 slugger is that Decker is short to the ball and has an easy feel for hitting, generating easy above-average power with a quick, strong swing. He's a baseball player and grinder who has become an area scout's favorite. His arm is his next-best tool after his bat, as he's thrown a no-hitter this spring, occasionally visits the low-90s with his fastball and spins a solid-average breaking ball. If he doesn't make it as a hitter, he definitely has a shot to become a lefthanded reliever, and if he winds up at Arizona State he could become a three-year, two-way star. His body leaves no room for projection, but he has one of the better now bats in the high school draft class. Decker's a second-round bat but probably fits lower on most boards due to his small stature.
13 43 Arizona Diamondbacks Wade Miley LHP Southeastern Louisiana La. $877,000
Miley was part of a banner 2005 class of Louisiana prep lefties that also included Beau Jones and Sean West, who went in the sandwich round of that draft, and Jeremy Bleich, who headed to Stanford. Miley may turn out to be the best of the group, as he owns three pitches that grade as plus when at their best. His top offering is an 80-84 mph slider that he can bury down and in against righthanders. He sits at 89-92 mph with his fastball and can reach 94-95 mph, though his heater flattens out at high-end velocity. His changeup is his third pitch, and his 75-77 mph curveball shows some potential. Miley has a sound delivery and a strong 6-foot-2, 195-pound frame. His command is no better than average, which is why he hasn't dominated mid-major Southland Conference competition and why some clubs project him as a reliever. But talented and proven college lefthanders are in short supply in this draft, so Miley could sneak into the first round with a club that has seen him at his best.
14 44 New York Yankees Jeremy Bleich LHP Stanford Calif. $700,000
Bleich, a Louisiana native, returned from his elbow strain in late May and could move into the first five rounds with a strong NCAA postseason. At his best, he sits in the 88-91 mph range with his fastball that has natural lefty movement, complemented by a solid curveball and a plus straight change.
15 45 Boston Red Sox Bryan Price RHP Rice Texas $849,000
Along with Andrew Cashner and Zach Stewart, Price is one of three Texas college relievers who looks like a first-rounder on his best days. Though he had a durable 6-foot-4, 200-pound frame and a promising fastball, Price worked just 17 innings over his first two years at Rice because he lacked secondary pitches, command and mound presence. He started to make strides at the end of his sophomore season, and this spring he has consistently shown a 90-95 fastball with sink. His hard slider has topped out at 87 mph, though it has devolved into more of a slurve at times. His control still needs work but has improved. He has an intriguing changeup but doesn't trust it enough to use it much in games. Some teams are interested in trying Price as a starter, and he was lights out for five innings against Texas State in his one start this year. However, he walked three of the four batters he faced in his next appearance, a relief outing five days later. His lack of a track record is a concern, though he'll probably go in the sandwich to second round.
16 46 San Diego Padres Logan Forsythe 3B Arkansas Ark. $835,000
Forsythe ranked second on Team USA with six steals and third with a .309 batting average (trailing only cinch first-rounder Pedro Alvarez and Brett Wallace), but he came down with a stress fracture in his right foot at the end of last summer. After having surgery in November, he wasn't able to train as he normally would, resulting in a hamstring pull this spring. Forsythe uses his legs in his swing, and the hamstring injury affected his stroke in the early going. Once he healed, he again began drilling line drives into the gaps and making a push for the second round. Scouts believe he'll have average power in the big leagues and liken his approach to Mike Lowell's, so he should provide enough offense to stick at the hot corner. If not, he's versatile enough to also have played second base, shortstop and left field for Team USA. The 6-foot-1, 208-pounder is more athletic than most third basemen. He has an above-average arm, moves well and is a solid-average runner with good instincts.