State Report: Mid-Atlantic

Delaware, West Virginia, Maryland and D.C. have little to offer




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THIS YEAR'S CROP
***** One for the books
**** Banner year
*** Solid, not spectacular
** Not up to par
* Nothing to see here
Rating compares this year's group to what a state typically produces, not to other states
The Mid-Atlantic can at least take solace in the fact that it produced Danny Hultzen, but the top college lefty is at Virginia now, three years removed from his days at St. Albans High in Washington, D.C. That 2008 group was a banner crop for the region, as was 2010, and 2011 doesn't come close to producing the same talent. It's possible that 10 rounds will pass before a Mid-Atlantic player is taken, something that hasn't happened since the draft began in 1965. The majority of this year's talent comes in the form of college arms.

NATIONAL TOP 200 PROSPECTS

None

OTHER PROSPECTS OF NOTE

1. Mike Mason, lhp, Marshall
2. Greg Williams, lhp, Marshall
3. Grant Buckner, 3b, West Virginia
4. Nick Howard, 3b, St. John's College HS, Washington, D.C.
5. Jerrell Allen, of, Milford (Del.) HS
6. Stephen Lumpkins, lhp, American
7. Chuck Ghysels, rhp, Maryland
8. Mike Garza, 3b, Georgetown
9. Rand Ravnaas, of, Georgetown
10. Erick Fernandez, c, Georgetown
11. Eric Potter, lhp, Maryland
12. Shane Campbell, lhp, Kenwood HS, Essex, Md.
13. K.J. Hockaday, 3b, Carroll School, Bel Air, Md.
14. Isaac Ballou, of, Marshall
15. Matt Bosse, of, Calvert Hall HS, Towson, Md.
16. Zach Morris, lhp, DeMatha HS, Hyattsville, Md.

SCOUTING REPORTS

Look Elsewhere

The best prep player in the region is Nick Howard, a shortstop/righthander who will move to a corner at the next level because of his below-average speed. He has a strong frame at 6-foot-2, 185 pounds and a plus arm that allows him to touch 93 mph off the mound. He also has a sharp slider, but he's a better prospect as a hitter with some pop.

Howard's conference rival, Zach Morris, looks good on paper as a lefthander with a 6-foot-4, 175-pound frame, but his stuff is fringy and his arm action needs work. He is committed to Cincinatti. Jerrell Allen is an excellent athlete who gave up basketball and football to concentrate on baseball. He's a 70 runner on the 20-80 scouting scale, but he's raw. He has a dead-hand set-up at the plate, and his swing will need to be overhauled.

Marshall has the most interesting talent in the region with lefthanders Mike Mason and Greg Williams and outfielder Isaac Ballou. Mason has a 6-foot-2, 195-pound frame that can drift to the soft side, and he throws strikes with an average fastball. Williams shows solid velocity in workouts, but he has thrown just 62 innings in three years, walking 44 in that span. Ballou garnered interest as a toolsy but raw outfielder in high school. He has good speed and 18 stolen bases this season, but he's a .261 hitter and has only 20 extra base hits in 326 career at-bats.

Maryland has a couple of interesting arms. Righthander Chuck Ghysels is a 5-foot-10, 205-pounder with a plus fastball that can touch 94. He has a high-effort delivery with some funk. Eric Potter started the season strong, hit some bumps in the middle and turned it back on late in the season, showing a fastball in the low 90s with decent secondary stuff. Teams could be attracted to him in the middle rounds as a 6-foot-4, 210-pound lefty with arm strength.

Stephen Lumpkins' best position may be as a forward on American's basketball team. He averaged 13.5 points and 8.2 rebounds a game last season. The 6-foot-8, 225-pounder is also a lefthander who can pitch in the high 80s, bumping 92 occasionally. The Pirates took him in the 42nd round in 2010 and he has made progress since then, throwing bullpens on a regular basis and cleaning up his delivery.

Two of Maryland's recruits likely won't get diverted from school, but bear watching down the road. Lefthander Shane Campbell is a 6-foot-3, 200 pounder who was 87-88 mph in the fall, though his velocity has been down this spring. Third baseman K.J. Hockdaday has a big frame at 6-foot-3, 215 pounds. He profiles as a corner guy with a little power and good athleticism. Matt Bosse is a toolsy outfielder who needs refinement but offers projection. He is 6-foot-5, 220 pounds and an average runner. His arm is fringe-average, so he would need to improve there to profile in right field.