Top 200 Prospects: 101-150

From Ryan Wright to Riley Moore




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See also: Scouting Reports On Prospects #1-50
See also: Scouting Reports On Prospects #51-100
See also: Scouting Reports On Prospects #151-200
See also: Bio/Statistical Information On The Top 200
See also: 2011 Draft Coverage

Baseball America compiles its Top 200 Prospects after interviews with college recruiters, area scouts, crosscheckers and scouting directors. BA editor John Manuel and executive editor Jim Callis line up the players and write the scouting reports, along with staff members Aaron Fitt, Conor Glassey and Nathan Rode, as well as contributor Matt Forman. Our list is meant to rank players in terms of talent, rather than where they will be drafted.

101. Ryan Wright, ss/2b
Louisville
Wright's best tool is bat, which he showed last summer when he led the U.S. college national team with a .361 average, including a .458 mark at the World University Championship. He has a smooth righthanded stroke, making consistent line-drive contract. The 6-foot-1, 194-pounder has fringy raw power and speed, yet he has reached double figures in both homers and steals in each of the last two seasons. He has good hands at the plate and in the field, and his instincts enable him to play above his tools. He has started at five positions—second base, shortstop, third base, left and right field—at Louisville, and projects as either an offensive second baseman or a utilityman. His arm and range are average at best, but he makes all the routine plays. Wright started slowly this spring but rallied to carry the Cardinals down the stretch, and he may have played his way into the second round in the process.

102. Kevin Comer, rhp
Seneca HS, Tabernacle, N.J.
At 6-foot-4, 210 pounds, Comer passes the eye test, and at his best he flashes stuff that would make him a lock for the top three rounds. Scouts haven't been able to get a good read on him this season, as he had thrown just 14 innings and had been inconsistent. Out of the gates, Comer sat in the low 90s and made it look easy. At his best, he also has a 12-to-6 curveball that falls off the table and has shown feel for a changeup. But he missed about 10 days in the middle of the season because of a class trip, and then left a game early and was showing mid-80s velocity. Scouts aren't sure if he is injured or just isn't interested in signing. He is committed to Vanderbilt, and most agree he could be a first-rounder after three years there.

103. Peter O'Brien, c
Bethune-Cookman
O'Brien emerged as a top college catching prospect last year, first when he hit 20 homers for Bethune-Cookman, then when he earned a spot on USA Baseball's college national team. On a team with many of the top hitters in the country, O'Brien hit four home runs and showed premium righthanded power, his best tool. His hitting has regressed as a junior, with more swings and misses and less feel for the barrel. While Bethune-Cookman doesn't have any arms near the quality of Team USA's, O'Brien nevertheless has struggled with his receiving this spring, as he did last summer. He's not a great athlete and struggles to receive breaking balls to his right. He has arm strength but lacks fluid footwork. Many scouts believe he has no chance to be a big league catcher, which would relegate him to first base. He has shown the work ethic and makeup needed to handle a staff, and there's some thought that improved core strength and more flexibility could make him passable as a catcher/first baseman in the Jake Fox mold.

104. Dillon Peters, lhp
Cathedral HS, Indianapolis
Peters has moved to the head of the class of an interesting group of Indiana high school pitchers, but he probably won't be drafted as high as his stuff alone would merit. His body (listed at 5-foot-11 and 190 pounds, though scouts think he's a couple of inches shorter) and strong commitment to Texas are concerns, though his biggest supporters liken him to Robbie Ross, a Rangers second-round pick in 2008. Peters' fastball runs from 90-94 mph, his hard curveball gives him a solid No. 2 pitch and his changeup is more advanced than with most high schoolers. His mechanics have a lot of effort and not much deception. His control is inconsistent and he gets little extension in his delivery, leading some scouts to wonder about how effective his fastball will be against pro hitters. Peters may not sign for less than first-round money, so there's no telling where he might go in the draft.

105. Kevin Matthews, lhp
Richmond Hill (Ga.) HS
In a down year for Georgia, high school pitching was particularly weak. Matthews jumped out, and not just because his athleticism allows him to dunk a basketball despite his 5-foot-10, 160-pound frame. He's a slight but quick-armed pitcher whose fastball has touched 94-95 mph, though he's usually in the 87-90 range. He has not shown the ability to sustain above-average velocity with any consistency. His tight curveball gives him a solid-average secondary pitch. He hasn't shown much of a changeup. Matthews' handle on Twitter is "UVAbound11," which gives a hint at the strength his Virginia commitment. While some scouts compare him to such recent draft picks as Kasey Kiker and Robbie Ross (both now in the Rangers system), others liken him more to lefthanded relievers such as Billy Wagner (obviously with less velocity). The consensus is that he's a future reliever due to the effort in his delivery.

106. Kyle Smith, rhp
Santaluces HS, West Palm Beach, Fla.
Smith emerged as a scouts' favorite in South Florida when he was the top performer in the area this spring as a power pitcher and solid hitter. His future will be on the mound, whether in pro ball or in college at Florida. Smith was a showcase regular the last two years and showed average fastball velocity from a quick-armed, small-framed body. He has pushed that heater up to 95 mph at times this spring, though it still sits 88-92. He has good feel for spinning a breaking ball and has depth and some power on the curveball, which at times gets slurvy. Smith could be a tough sell to crosscheckers because of his size—he's listed at 6 feet, 180 pounds—but he does other things to endear him to evaluators. He keeps a quick, aggressive tempo, pitches with swagger, competes hard and has excellent baseball instincts. He's athletic and repeats his compact delivery. Some scouts point to Smith's family and expect him to get more physical. He could go out in the first three rounds.

107. Senquez Golson, of
Pascagoula (Miss.) HS
Golson plays at the alma mater of Terrell Buckley, a former NFL defensive back who also played outfield at Florida State, and Buckley has worked with him throughout his high school career. Golson is also a two-sport athlete and has a football scholarship to Mississippi. Golson is an electric athlete with plus-plus speed (4.0 seconds flat to first base), present strength, broad shoulders and physical ability to burn. Apart from his athleticism, his best tool is his bat. He generates tremendous bat speed and has a short, compact swing in his 6-foot frame. With more experience, he could generate above-average power. He's raw but no more than other high school hitters, and scouts praise his high school coaches for helping polish Golson's game. Mississippi plans on having him play center field, and he has average arm strength. That said, football has been his primary sport, and he doesn't have a lot of experience against top pitching. He didn't fare well against Mississippi's top prep pitcher, Hawtin Buchanan, a fellow Ole Miss signee. Rebels football coach Houston Nutt has talked up Golson in the spring, saying he'll start at cornerback in the fall, and Golson's signability ultimately will determine where he goes in the draft.

108. Dante Bichette Jr., of
Orangewood Christian HS, Orlando
Bichette's father played 14 seasons in the major leagues, earning four All-Star Game nods, collecting 1,906 hits and 274 home runs and even posting a 30-30 season in 1996. His son is cut from similar cloth. He's a righthanded hitter who has solid athleticism and a track record of performance, going back to helping his Little League team reach Williamsport, Pa. The younger Bichette is a high school infielder, but his profile will wind up being that of a power-hitting left fielder. He lacks fluidity defensively, and his best tool when he's not in the batter's box is his throwing arm. Offense is his calling card, and he's a cage rat who often can be found taking extra rounds of batting practice. Bichette has had a lot of movement in his swing but has toned down a bit this season while still producing big power and plenty of bat speed. He has as much raw power as any prep player in Florida and runs well enough to be a corner outfielder if he can't stay in the infield. He's committed to Georgia.

109. Dan Vogelbach, 1b
Bishop Verot HS, Fort Myers, Fla.
Vogelbach is not a good runner, but he helped Bishop Verot win the Florida 3-A championship for the first time since 1994 when he scampered home from second base with the winning run on a deflected single by Hudson Boyd—a likely top-two-rounds pick as a pitcher. Vogelbach hit 17 homers in 32 games and has some of the best lefthanded power in the draft due to excellent strength and a sound, loose swing. He put it on display last December at the annual Power Showcase—the event made famous by Bryce Harper's 502-foot homer—by launching one 508 feet with a metal bat and won the event. He is more than a masher, with solid hitting ability and a fairly polished approach. But at 6 feet, 240 pounds, Vogelbach has work to do physically and will never be thought of as athletic. He has trimmed up in the last year, particularly since last summer's East Coast Pro Showcase, when he weighed more than 280 pounds. Vogelbach is limited to first base and may be limited to the American League, but he may hit his way into the firs three rounds. He's committed to Florida.

110. Jeff Soptic, rhp
Johnson County (Kan.) CC
Few pitchers in this draft can light up a radar gun like Soptic can, but his lack of consistency likely will keep him out of the first couple of rounds. The 6-foot-6, 220-pounder's arm works easily, as he effortlessly delivers fastballs at 93-96 mph and peaks at 100. Velocity is the one constant with Soptic. His four-seam fastball is fairly straight and gets hit harder than it should. He'll flash a plus slider at times, but it's below-average more often than not. His changeup is a distant third pitch. Unless he can significantly improve his control and secondary pitches, Soptic probably will have to settle for being a reliever as a pro. Nevertheless, his arm strength and body are hard to ignore. Drafted in the 43rd round out of high school by the Royals but unselected when he maxed out at 94 mph as a freshman, Soptic will attend Missouri if he doesn't turn pro.

111. Colton Murray, rhp
Kansas
Murray put himself on the prospect map with an all-star summer last year in the Cape Cod League, where he saved eight games and allowed just one earned run in 19 innings. He has continued to impress at Kansas, where he has been a key contributor in the bullpen for three seasons. Though he's just 6 feet and 193 pounds, Murray generates a 91-94 mph fastball without much effort. He complements his fastball, which features some life, with a solid slider. His pitches tend to get on hitters quickly because his high leg kick adds deception to his delivery. He consistently throws strikes as well. Murray may not have closer stuff, but he could be a set-up man who won't require a lot of minor league seasoning before he's ready for the majors.

112. Carl Thomore, of
East Brunswick (N.J.) HS
Thomore has battled adversity to become a premium prospect in this year's draft. His mother died with breast cancer in 2005, and then he sustained a gruesome injury in a showcase in suburban Atlanta last summer. Thomore's cleat got caught in the dirt as he slid into third base, dislocating and breaking his ankle. An orthopedic surgeon who was in the stands came onto the field to help. He offered the choice of going to the hospital for treatment—risking complications because Thomore's circulation had been restricted—or popping the bone back into place on the field. Thomore gritted his teeth and chose the latter, and some say the decision and the doctor (who has never been identified) saved his baseball career. Scouts love Thomore's grinder mentality, and he grows on people the more they seem him. His only standout tool is his power, which is above-average. A plus runner before the injury, Thomore is now average, but he's aggressive with good instincts and is better under way. He profiles as a corner outfielder with an average arm. He's a physical 6-foot-1, 195 pounds and projects as an average hitter who can go to all fields.

113. Navery Moore, rhp
Vanderbilt
Moore has come back from Tommy John surgery back in high school to become a factor in Vanderbilt's deep bullpen. He made just three appearances as a freshman and 10 as a sophomore, totaling fewer than 18 innings, but has served as Vandy's closer most of this season and had a team-high nine saves. He didn't give up an extra-base hit until the mid-May series against Florida, when he gave up two home runs and a double. While he's not intimidating on the mound at 6-foot-2, 205 pounds, Moore has closer stuff, starting with his fastball. It can be a swing-and-miss pitch in the strike zone, with velocity in the 92-96 mph range, and has solid life. Moore's breaking ball is more of a sweepy slider than a downer breaker, and he has a hard time repeating his release point. Some scouts believe his long arm action will preclude his breaking ball from ever being a swing-and-miss pitch, which could limit him to a set-up role. He also earns high grades for his makeup.

114. Brooks Pinckard, rhp
Baylor
Pinckard is one of the fastest runners in college baseball and has used his plus-plus speed to steal 60 bases in 66 attempts over three seasons. He ended the 2011 regular season tied for sixth in NCAA Division I with 31 swipes in 33 tries. He also plays a solid center field, though scouts see him as a slap hitter and are much more interested in what he can do on the mound. Pinckard has a consistent 92-96 mph fastball with life, and he didn't lose velocity when he moved into the rotation in the last month of the season. After relying on his heater as a reliever, he has made strides with his slider and now throws it at 82-84 mph, though it lacks consistency. He also has a changeup but hasn't used it often. A quality athlete at 6-foot-1 and 195 pounds, Pinckard could take off once he focuses on pitching. He redshirted in 2008 because he wasn't ready for Big 12 Conference competition and has pitched just 106 innings in three seasons, so he's still raw as a pitcher. He doesn't have much feel, so he struggles with walks and doesn't miss as many bats as someone with a mid-90s fastball should. His delivery doesn't help his command, as he has a short arm angle and slings the body from a low slot, and his future likely will be back in the bullpen. He declined to sign with the Cubs as a draft-eligible sophomore taken in the 18th round last year, and he should get picked about 15 rounds higher this June.

115. Dusty Robinson, of
Fresno State
Robinson went undrafted out of high school, but he has performed well for Fresno State for three years. He has a compact, muscular frame at 5-foot-11 and 195 pounds, and he's a grinder who always gives 100 percent. But he also has tools, as an above-average runner with above-average power potential and a strong arm. He has a similar frame and skill set to Brent Morel of the White Sox, who was a third-round pick out of Cal Poly in 2008, but Robinson is a better runner who could play center field. Robinson's power does come with  strikeouts, so he doesn't project to hit for a high average. Robinson doesn't offer much in the way of projection, but he has an interesting package of tools, drive and a history of performing well for a good team.

116. Cody Asche, 3b
Nebraska
While many college hitters have had trouble adjusting to less lively bats this spring, Asche has thrived. After totaling 19 doubles and 12 homers in his first two years at Nebraska, he drilled 27 and 12 during the 2011 regular season. His season almost was derailed before it started, as he missed fall practice with stretched ligaments in the arch of his foot, but the injury responded to rest and rehabilitation. Asche's best tool is his lefthanded power, which rates a 55 or 60 on the 20-80 scouting scale. He has good hand-eye coordination and a sound approach, so he should hit for a solid average as well. Six-foot-2 and 198 pounds, Asche is a decent runner once he gets going. He also has average arm strength, but lacks soft hands and quick feet, so he'll probably have to move off third base in pro ball. He's athletic enough to try the outfield, and some scouts wonder if his tools might translate well behind the plate.

117. Bryce Bandilla, lhp
Arizona
Bandilla has a lot of qualities scouts like: He's a beast at 6-foot-4, 237 pounds and can get his fastball up to 97 mph from the left side. He hasn't been consistent this year, however, and while he has the most electric stuff in Arizona's bullpen, he has pitched mostly in the middle innings and hasn't been trusted to close. When his stuff is on, it's undeniable. His fastball sits in the 92-95 mph range, and his best secondary offering is an above-average changeup that he has a good feel for. He throws a slurvy breaking ball in the bullpen but rarely uses it in games. He needs work on his fastball command and has some effort in his delivery as he flies open a little bit. Still, he could get a chance to start as a pro because his velocity from the left side is so rare.

118. Gabriel Rosa, of
Colegio Hector Urdaneta, Rio Grande, P.R.
The top position player in Puerto Rico in 2011, Rosa has committed to Bethune-Cookman. Scouts didn't expect him to reach college, though, as he has enough present tools to go out in the first four rounds. Two scouts compared him to former big league outfielder Juan Encarnacion for his rangy frame and solid all-around tools. He has a loose body with projection and should fill out his 6-foot-4, 180-pound frame. Some scouts believe he'll have to move to a corner, while others believe the current shortstop can stay in center field. He has solid raw power and is a plus runner, though he's no burner. Rosa has bad timing habits that tend to cause him to lead with his shoulder and open up too early in his swing in an attempt to pull the ball. His swing path has some inconsistencies as well, and he doesn't keep his bat in the hitting zone long enough. Rosa's arm plays average.

119. Jeff Ames, rhp
Lower Columbia (Wash.) JC
Ames has already been drafted twice: by the Phillies (46th round) in 2009 out of high school in Vancouver, Wash., and last year by the Rockies (30th round) out of Lower Columbia. His stuff has gradually improved each year, and he took things up a notch last summer, sitting 92-95 mph and touching 97 in the West Coast League, ranking as the league's No. 3 prospect. His stuff has held up this spring, as his fastball has been consistently in the mid-90s. His fastball has nasty, riding life and arm-side run. His breaking ball doesn't always show the tight break scouts like to see, his changeup is just all right, and he does pitch with some effort, but he should go high enough this year to keep him away from his commitment to Oregon.

120. J.R. Graham, rhp
Santa Clara
Graham has always been a fighter. He was born three months premature and weighed 2 pounds, and as an infant he stopped breathing in his father's arms before reviving. The Athletics took him in the 46th round in 2008 out of Livermore (Calif.) High, but he headed to Santa Clara as a two-way player. He has turned his focus to pitching now and is getting second-round buzz, thanks to a fastball that sits in the mid- to upper 90s. Graham isn't physically imposing, standing 6 feet and 175 pounds. He is blessed with a lot of fast-twitch muscle and gives a lot of credit for his arm strength to his father, who helped develop his workout program. The program utilizes plyometrics and medicine balls to improve core strength and explosiveness. Despite his big arm strength, Graham draws skepticism from some scouts. He's a bulldog on the mound, but he doesn't get a lot of angle on his fastball and his slider has been inconsistent. He'll also need to work on his changeup.

121. Cory Mazzoni, rhp
North Carolina State
Mazzoni has been the Wolfpack's ace this season, and he leads a pack of righthanders in North Carolina because he has the best chance of remaining a starter at the pro level. Solidly built at 6-foot-1, 195 pounds, he has been durable and holds his velocity deep into games while doing a good job of repeating his delivery. He will typically sit at 90-94 mph with his fastball and can dial it up to 97 when he needs it. He also works with a power breaking ball that isn't always consistent but can be above-average, and a splitter. It's not a conventional package for a starter because he doesn't throw a soft pitch to his glove side. His 3-6, 3.93 record is misleading. In 92 innings, Mazzoni had 105 strikeouts and 27 walks while opponents were hitting .229 against him. Scouts like his competitive nature and think he could be a back-of-the-rotation starter or move quickly as a late-inning reliever. Mazzoni figures to go off the board around the third round.

122. Jake Hager, ss
Sierra Vista HS, Las Vegas
Hager doesn't have one standout tool, but he can do a little bit of everything and always plays hard. He's an average runner but has nice actions at shortstop with an above-average arm. Hager is a good hitter and performed with wood at showcase events last fall. He has some pop, though he profiles as more of a gap hitter with average power. His tools play up because he's the prototypical baseball rat. He has passion for the game and is typically the dirtiest guy on the field, playing with toughness and energy. He's a leader on the field with good makeup, exactly what you want from a shortstop. He could go as high as the second round and if he doesn't sign, he'll head to Arizona State.

123. Madison Boer, rhp
Oregon
Boer has the type of frame scouts look for in starting pitchers. He's big and strong at 6-foot-4 and 215 pounds and he's a good athlete that ran a 6.7-second 60-yard dash for scouts in the fall. The athleticism helps give Boer a clean and efficient delivery and helps him maintain stamina throughout game. His fastball sits in the 90-93 mph range, but there could be more in there—he's touched 96 before in relief stints and moved back to the bullpen late this spring as he tired out. Boer has a good slider, but it's the splitter he added to this year that has helped the most. He throws the pitch with two different grips. If he needs to throw it for a strike, he'll keep the ball closer to his fingertips, throwing it like a changeup. But he can also put the ball deeper into his hand to get more depth on the pitch if he's trying to get a hitter to chase.

124. Billy Flamion, of
Central Catholic HS, Modesto, Calif.
Flamion played well on the showcase circuit last summer and showed some of the best bat speed in this year's high school class—and from the left side of the plate. He is also a football player and came into the spring a little rusty with some softness to his body. He pressed at times and didn't show the kind of production scouts hoped to see. He could be an above-average hitter with above-average power, and a team will have to buy into Flamion's bat because he doesn't show many other tools. He's a below-average runner and he has an average arm, so it's likely he winds up in left field. He also needs to work on making quicker adjustments. Once thought of as a supplemental-round talent, Flamion's stock has slipped and he's looking more like a third-rounder. It will likely take more than third-round money to buy him out of his commitment to Oregon.

125. Matt Summers, rhp
UC Irvine
Summers arrived at UC Irvine as a center fielder with a strong arm, throwing just 38 innings (and posting an 8.36 ERA) over his first two college seasons. He hit even more sparingly, though, and made the decision to focus on his pitching last summer in the Cape Cod League, where he ran his fastball up to 96-97 mph in a relief role. He has taken a dramatic step forward on the mound as a junior, taking over as Irvine's Friday starter and ranking second in the Big West in ERA and opponent average and third in strikeouts. Summers still looks like a position player on the mound. He pitches exclusively from the stretch and has an extremely short arm action that makes his stuff hard to pick up and leads scouts to project him as a reliever in pro ball. He holds the velocity on his 90-93 mph fastball and will occasionally run it up to 94-95. His second pitch is a power curveball that projects as a solid-average offering, and he dabbles with a changeup but throws it sparingly. Summers is an excellent athlete with a durable 6-foot-1, 205-pound frame. Scouts believe his fastball will play up in a relief role in pro ball, and he has shown excellent aptitude since switching to a full-time pitching role, which is also encouraging.

126. Scott McGough, rhp
Oregon
Scouts got excited about McGough, the son of a former Indians farmhand, after he went 5-2, 2.45 last spring and then had a successful summer with Team USA. His results (4.28 ERA in 29 appearances) haven't matched his stuff this season pitching out of the Ducks bullpen, which has puzzled scouts. He isn't physical at 6-foot-1 and 185 pounds, but he's the best athlete on the staff and has a quick, loose arm. He pitches at 92-94 mph with his fastball and can run it up to 96. Oregon tried to add a curveball and a changeup to McGough's arsenal this year, but he decided to focus on developing one wipeout pitch instead of three average offerings. His go-to strikeout pitch is an 82-84 mph slider that has been inconsistent this spring, but he can throw it for strikes. McGough can get caught between breaking balls, but his slider has the chance to be above-average. His pure stuff, solid track record and competitive makeup give him the potential to work at the back end of a bullpen.

127. Mason Hope, rhp
Broken Arrow (Okla.) HS
Most of the time, a guy who can reach 94 mph with his fastball and back it up with a sharp breaking ball would be the top high school pitching prospect in his state and certainly on his team. That's not the case with Hope, the No. 2 starter on Broken Arrow's Oklahoma 6-A state championship team behind Archie Bradley, and the fourth-best arm in a loaded Sooner State prep class after Dylan Bundy, Bradley and Michael Fulmer. Athletic and projectable at 6-foot-3 and 180 pounds, Hope usually pitches at 90-92 mph and could add velocity in the future. His curveball is a wipeout pitch at times. He lands hard on a stiff front leg in his delivery, which causes him to pitch up in the zone more than he should. Though his father Pat was a star pitcher at Oklahoma State in the mid-1980s, Hope has committed to archrival Oklahoma.

128. Jake Reed, rhp
Helix Charter HS, La Mesa, Calif.
Also a high school quarterback, Reed earns raves for his athleticism and makeup. He has outstanding feel for pitching and a promising three-pitch mix. He spots his fastball well and it ranges from 88-92 mph, peaking at 93. His breaking ball and changeup both flash average, and he can throw both pitches for strikes. He gets caught in between breaking balls; sometimes it looks more like a slider with good depth, and other times more like a curveball. His changeup has late sink when it's on, but he needs to become more consistent with it. Reed's arm action is a little funky and short, but he could add velocity as he fills out his 6-foot-2, 175-pound frame. He's committed to Oregon, but as one of the top two prep righthanders in Southern California, he could be drafted in the top three to five rounds.

129. James McCann, c
Arkansas
McCann is a California product who was drafted in the 31st round out of high school and has started for most of the last three seasons at Arkansas. He is putting together his best college season as a consistent hitter for a relatively punchless Arkansas club, rebounding from a .105 showing in the Cape Cod League last summer. McCann doesn't have any standout tools, but he also doesn't have a glaring weakness. He has a chance to hit for average and has fringe-average power, though his swing can get long. His home runs usually come on mistakes, and he has had issues with velocity. McCann has a solid-average arm and is a fringe-average receiver whose actions can get long defensively as well. His solid 6-foot-2, 210-pound frame is a plus, as are his leadership skills and intangibles. The thin college catcher crop should help him get drafted in the first three rounds.

130. Nick Maronde, lhp
Florida
Maronde entered his senior high school season in Kentucky as the No. 19 player on BA's Top 100 high school prospects list. He was a 43rd-round pick by the Athletics in 2008 because of the strength of his commitment to Florida, and he got 11 starts as a freshman, leading the team in strikeouts. He struggled as a sophomore, relegated to a relief role and posting a 6.15 ERA. He found success as a reliever this year, dominating at times with an above-average fastball and aggressive approach. Maronde's fastball has reached 96 and sits 90-94 mph, and he has shown the ability to pitch off it, at times to the exclusion of his other stuff. He had a recent outing with 26 straight fastballs and used no other pitch. His control of his fastball and slider are both better this year, and at times his slider is average. He hasn't used his changeup much, though he threw it as a freshman and in high school. His 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame and potential three-pitch mix make it likely he'll return to a starting role once he's drafted, though he could move quickly as a power-armed lefthanded reliever.

131. Taylor Sparks, 3b
St. John Bosco HS, Bellflower, Calif.
Sparks' father Don played for coach Dave Snow at Loyola Marymount and was a fifth-round pick of the Yankees in 1988 who played nine seasons as a corner infielder in pro ball. Sparks was a standout wide receiver for the St. John Bosco football team before focusing on baseball in 2010, when he stood out at the Area Code Games along with Bosco teammate Dante Flores. Sparks played an able shortstop this spring, demonstrating soft hands, quick feet and a quick release, but his range is limited and he profiles better as a third baseman as he grows into his 6-foot-3, 200-pound frame. He has average arm strength but below-average accuracy. He's an outstanding, physical athlete with average speed under way. Sparks takes a "major league batting practice," as one scout put it, flashing plus raw power, but it doesn't yet translate to games. Early in the spring, his stance was upright and his swing had plenty of holes, but he made an adjustment midway through the year, spreading out his lower half and flattening his stroke. His performance this spring has not matched his tools, and scouts seem content to let him go to UC Irvine and refine his game. He's a good student and is considered a tough sign.

132. John Curtiss, rhp
Carroll HS, Southlake, Texas
Best known as a football power that has produced a half-dozen NFL players, Carroll High also has had four pitchers drafted in the previous four years. Curtiss will likely be the fifth in five drafts, though scouts think he's headed to college, as are most of the top high school pitchers in the Lone Star State this year. A top student who has committed to Texas, Curtiss is a projectable 6-foot-4, 190-pounder with a quick arm. He works from 89-93 mph and touches 95 with his fastball, which features good sink. He also flashes a plus slider and an effective changeup. Scouts praise his intelligence and competitiveness. The only real knock against Curtiss is that he throws across his body, but his motion adds deception without compromising his ability to throw strikes. If he becomes a Longhorn as expected, he could blossom into a first-rounder in 2014.

133. Kevin Cron, 1b
Mountain Pointe HS, Phoenix
C.J. Cron isn't the only Cron in this draft with a huge bat. His younger brother shattered the Arizona high school career home run record this year, finishing with 59, including 27 this season as he helped his team win a state title. Cron is almost a clone of his older brother. He has a softer body at 6-foot-3 and 240 pounds, but it's all about the hitting and power tools for those two. Kevin has some arm strength but will be limited to first base because of his lack of athleticism and below-average speed. High school first basemen that hit from the right side of the plate aren't usually premium picks, but Cron's bat is that intriguing. He has good bat speed and well above-average raw power. Rumors had him looking for a seven-figure signing bonus, and if he doesn't get an offer to his liking he'd be happy to honor his commitment to Texas Christian.

134. Nick Burdi, rhp
Downers Grove (Ill.) South HS
Burdi has the best high school arm in the upper Midwest. He struck out the side in his inning of work at the Under Armour All-America Game last August, then showed an electric 93-95 mph fastball that topped out at 97 at the World Wood Bat Championship two months later. He showed similar arm strength in his first two starts this spring, then missed a month for a variety of reasons and hasn't been the same since. In May, his velocity ranged from 84-93 mph. The 6-foot-4, 220-pounder slings the ball from a low three-quarters arm slot, and scouts already were worried about his delivery and projected him as a reliever. He doesn't repeat his mechanics, and sometimes his fastball gets flat and sits up in the zone. His No. 2 pitch is a hard slider that can be devastating at times but lacks consistency. Burdi's lackluster spring, commitment to Louisville and reported seven-figure price tag may cause him to slide in the draft. A team that considers him signable could pop him in the third or fourth round.

135. Adrian Houser, rhp
Locust Grove (Okla.) HS
Houser's last high school outing was one of his best. He took a no-hitter into the sixth inning and finished with a 16-strikeout two-hitter in the Oklahoma 4-A quarterfinals, and two days later Locust Grove won its first baseball championship. Also a center fielder, he scored two of Locust Grove's four runs and threw out a runner at the plate in the semifinals, and made a nifty back-to-the-infield catch during the finale. An Oklahoma recruit, Houser has good size (6-foot-3, 200 pounds) and a quick arm capable of delivering 90-92 mph fastballs and topping out at 95. He also shows feel for a hard curveball but has a lot of work to do with his changeup. He uses his height and a high arm slot to throw on a steep downhill angle. Though he's athletic, Houser needs to do a better job of maintaining his delivery and command. His father Mike is the baseball coach at Locust Grove, and one of his cousins (Bob Davis) spent eights seasons in the big leagues as a big league catcher.

136. Adam Morgan, lhp
Alabama
Alabama's roster is thin on tools, and the Crimson Tide may not have more than one player drafted in the first 10 rounds: Morgan, who has had flashes of brilliance mixed with low points. He has pitched in the rotation for three seasons, and his solid size and good arm action entice scouts. His delivery, arm action and delivery evoke Cliff Lee, though he doesn't have Lee's stuff or command. Morgan does pound the strike zone and at times pitches downhill with a 90-92 mph fastball. He also has flashed an above-average slider that will touch 84 mph, and his changeup flashes average as well. So why doesn't Morgan dominate? His fastball more regularly sits in the 87-90 mph range, and even at lower velocity it can flatten out. He has a stiff front leg in his delivery that at times prevents him from keeping the ball down, and his slider is inconsistent. He has been durable this season, though his delivery does raise injury concerns with some scouts.

137. Hawtin Buchanan, rhp
Biloxi (Miss.) HS
Scouts flocked to Mississippi for a deep pool of high school talent this year, and the towering Buchanan seemed to be at his best when the heat was on. At 6-foot-8, he's athletic enough to have played quarterback in the fall, and he has room to fill out even though he's a listed 230 pounds. He repeats his delivery well for a prep pitcher of his size, and one evaluator called him the "definition of a big-body power arm." He elicits comparisons to former Ole Miss righthander Cody Satterwhite, who was similarly physical, but Buchanan may throw harder more consistently. After sitting 86-91 mph early in the spring, he was hitting more 93s as the season went along. His changeup is his best secondary pitch, and he hasn't shown much of a feel for his loopy, slow curveball. Some scouts are concerned about Buchanan's arm action in the back, as his elbow tends to get inverted, much as Stephen Strasburg's more celebrated arm does. Buchanan was at his best against the likes of Senquez Golson and Mason Robbins, two of Mississippi's top prep hitters. He's an Ole Miss legacy who is considered a tough sign.

138. Daniel Camarena, lhp/of
Cathedral Catholic HS, San Diego
Camarena has performed as well as any prep player in Southern California this spring. If you throw out his lone loss of the season (when he walked four in three innings), Camarena issued just two walks in 49 innings this spring while striking out 76, illustrating his superb feel for pitching and ability to carve up the strike zone. Camarena's fastball ranged from 85-88 mph last year, and he sat at 87-88 in the MLB Urban Invitational in February. But he worked hard to add strength and his velocity jumped a tick this spring, ranging from 87-91. Though his arm action is clean, his 6-foot-1, 205-pound frame lacks projection. He makes up for it with his polish and command. Camarena has excellent feel for his changeup, which some scouts rate as an average pitch, but he rarely needed to use it at the high school level. His curveball has good depth and projects as a solid-average pitch, as he already flashes a big league breaking ball sometimes. Most scouts see Camarena's future on the mound, but he could be a standout two-way player if he honors his commitment to San Diego, and he has pro talent as a hitter as well. Camarena has a smooth, balanced lefthanded swing with some looseness to it and a gap-to-gap approach. He's an adequate runner who would fit at a corner defensively.

139. Kody Watts, rhp
Skyview HS, Vancouver, Wash.
Watts flew under the radar because he didn't make the Northwest Area Code Games team and isn't from the Seattle area, where most of the talent in the state is concentrated. He has a nice, athletic build at 6-foot-3 and 185 pounds with projection remaining. His fastball sits in the 89-93 mph range, and he can run it up to 95. Watts throws a good, hard curveball, a slider that is just adequate and a splitter with a chance to be an above-average pitch. Watts can command the splitter, but he'll need to make sure there's enough separation in his arsenal because now everything is hard. Watts has the most upside of any high school pitcher in the Northwest, but he may not be a premium pick because he has expressed a strong interest in college. Watts comes from an affluent family and is a premium recruit for Portland, where he should be a good pick three years from now.

140. Clay Holmes, rhp
Slocomb (Ala.) HS
Holmes was being recruited by most of Alabama's mid-major programs such as Troy and Samford last year, but Auburn swooped in to grab his commitment after his stuff jumped up a notch this spring and he became the state's top propsect. A strong student, he is the state coaches association's student-athlete of the year, is his school's valedictorian and got a lot tougher to sign when Auburn entered the picture. Holmes is a classic raw arm from the South, with good size but plenty to learn in pro ball. At 6-foot-4, 225 pounds, he has present strength in his frame and in his arm, with an above-average fastball at 90-93 mph. He holds his velocity better at some times than others, typical of a high school pitcher, and has shown the ability to stay tall in his delivery and throw downhill. His slider has ranged from average with flashes of plus to terrible. Scouts who have seen it good like its power and occasional depth. His delivery has plenty of effort and is far from fluid, leading to bouts of wildness, but his arm is fast enough to overcome the flaws and he racked up plenty of strikeouts. Scouts also disagree about his level of athleticism.

141. Matt Price, rhp
South Carolina
Price and roommate Jackie Bradley will never have to buy a beer in South Carolina after the careers they've had for the Gamecocks. Price broke his right wrist in March of his freshman year and got a medical redshirt, then became the closer for the 2010 Gamecocks, picking up the victory in the College World Series clincher and striking out 80 in 53 innings. He had more saves (15 to 10) but had been less dominant in 2011, with 56 strikeouts in 42 innings. He's had to pitch to contact more as his fastball velocity has fluctuated. After hitting a lot of 95s and 96s last season, he's lived more at 91-92 mph this season, with occasional bursts of more velocity. His slider has been an average pitch for him this year, and at times it plays up. Scouts note he pitches better with more on the line and feeds off adrenaline. Price is maxed out physically but throws strikes with two pitches that can be plus at their best. He has moxie and big-game experience to spare.

142. Taylor Featherston, ss
Texas Christian
Featherston was one of the heroes in Texas Christian's run to its first College World Series appearance last year, batting .389 with 16 RBIs in 11 NCAA tournament games. He led the Horned Frogs in hitting (.347), on-base percentage (.425) and runs (48) during the 2011 regular season and has a better bat than most middle infielders. A 6-foot-1, 185-pound righthanded hitter, he makes consistent contact and has enough pop to hit 10 homers in a big league season if he gets a little stronger and uses his legs better in his swing. He has average speed and good instincts on the bases. The question with Featherston is whether he can stay at shortstop. He has a strong arm and enough range but two different area scouts used the exact same phrase to describe his defense: "He plays shortstop like his hair is on fire." Featherston had 24 errors in 55 games, most coming when he rushed himself or tried to make an impossible play. He profiles well enough as an offensive second baseman but could sneak into the first three rounds to a team that believes he can settle down at short.

143. Bryson Miles, of
Stephen F. Austin State
Miles has put up some of the gaudiest numbers in college baseball this spring, leading NCAA Division I with 50 stolen bases and drawing Kirby Puckett comparisons while batting .413 and setting Stephen F. Austin State records for hits (92) and steals in a season and career. Built like a barrel at 6 feet and 225 pounds, Miles originally intended to play linebacker at Texas Christian but wound up spending the first two years of his college career in Weatherford (Texas) JC's baseball program. A righthanded hitter, he has quick hands and plenty of strength, but he employs an all-or-nothing swing that more advanced pitchers may be able to exploit. Despite his steal totals, Miles isn't a blazer. He has plus speed and good instincts on the bases, though he has been caught 13 times this spring. He's a fringy defender whose below-average arm relegates him to left field, so his bat and baserunning will have to carry him. Teams have passed him over in the draft for three straight years, but that won't happen again in 2011.

144. Steven Proscia, 3b
Virginia
Proscia attended New Jersey's Don Bosco Prep for high school, when he was a third baseman on a team that finished No. 2 in the country in 2008, as well as a wide receiver and defensive back for the nationally ranked football team. At 6-foot-2, 230 pounds, he is a physical athlete. He doesn't move well laterally but has a chance to stay at third base thanks to a strong arm, soft hands and ability to come in on balls. He can handle the bat, though sometimes he swings too much with his upper body and shoulders rather than letting his hands work. He has solid power, tying teammate John Hicks with five home runs for the team lead in Virginia's expansive ballpark.

145. Tyler Grimes, ss
Wichita State
Grimes has better all-around tools than most college shortstops, and a club that thinks he can improve his consistency may be tempted to pop him as early as the second or third round. He excels at getting on base, ranking among the NCAA Division I leaders in both walks (49, 10th in the nation) and getting hit by pitches (19, 13th) during the regular season. The 5-foot-11, 181-pounder also has more bat speed than most middle infielders, though that can work against him. He takes a huge cut from the right side of the plate, leading to too many strikeouts (57 in 227 at-bats) and lower batting averages (he's a career .283 hitter at Wichita State). Grimes has plus speed and uses it well on the bases in the field. He also has a strong arm and can make nifty plays at shortstop, but he also plays out of control at times. He committed 28 errors in 60 regular-season games after making a total of 25 in his first two years with the Shockers.

146. Jason Coats, of
Texas Christian
Coats had a banner 2010, setting a Texas Christian record with 99 hits, helping the Horned Frogs reach the College World Series for the first time and starring in the Cape Cod League. A strong encore might have carried him into the first round, but he has had a lackluster spring, leading scouts to wonder whether he has a true plus tool. After hitting .314 with wood bats on the Cape, he batted .324 with metal this season. His swing looked longer and his pitch recognition looked less sharp than it did a year ago. Six-foot-2 and 190 pounds, Coats has a sound approach and provides average raw power from the right side of the plate. His speed, arm strength and defense are fringy to average, so he fits best in left field. A team that envisions Coats becoming the .280/20-homer hitter he looked like a year ago could grab him in the second or third round, but he no longer figures to go higher than that.

147. Bobby Crocker, of
Cal Poly
Crocker is much more physical than the other top outfielder from Northern California, Fresno State's Dusty Robinson, and they're very different players. Scouts can project more with Crocker more than they can with Robinson, who is what he is. Crocker is an above-average runner with some juice in his bat, though he doesn't turn on balls as well as he should. He has an inside-out approach right now, but could definitely start showing his power more as he gets into pro ball and loosens up his swing. Crocker is an impressive athlete with a chiseled, 6-foot-3, 230-pound frame. He's a hard worker with an unusual amount of upside remaining for a college junior.

148. Dante Flores, 2b
St. John Bosco HS, Bellflower, Calif.
Flores has been on the national stage for years, earning a spot on the USA Baseball 14-and-under national team in 2007. He made a favorable impression playing alongside St. John Bosco teammate Taylor Sparks in the Area Code Games last summer, and he showcased one of Southern California's best pure strokes this spring. His 5-foot-11, 160-pound build and quick, efficient, compact lefthanded swing prompt comparisons to Kolten Wong, a likely first-round pick out of Hawaii this year. Flores makes consistent contact and laces hard line drives to all fields, and he has a chance to be an above-average hitter as he adds strength. The bat is his only standout tool, however. Flores has wiry strength that gives him sneaky power, but he'll have below-average home run pop. He's a below-average to fringe-average runner who lacks the range and arm strength to play shortstop in pro ball. He plays second base in high school in deference to Sparks and profiles best at that position, with the actions to be an average defender and a playable arm. Flores has top-five-rounds talent but has told clubs he is determined to honor his commitment to Southern California, where he could be an impact player from day one.

149. Aaron Brown, of/lhp
Chatsworth (Calif.) HS
Physical and athletic, Brown has legitimate two-way talent, though most scouts prefer him as a hitter. A veteran of the showcase circuit, Brown made a splash in the Jesse Flores Memorial All Star Game in November, when he ripped an RBI double to left-center. He also struck out Mike Moustakas in a Chatsworth alumni game last year. Brown has good strength in his 6-foot-2, 200-pound frame, and he flashes above-average raw power in batting practice, though it does not yet translate to games. In the past, Brown had a tendency to open his hips too early in his swing, but he has made a conscious effort to stay closed longer and drive the ball the other way. His lefthanded swing is compact and flat, giving him a chance to be an average hitter in time, but his bat remains inconsistent. He swings and misses more than he should, a result of timing and pitch recognition issues. He's a fringe-average runner who projects as an average corner outfielder, and his solid-average to plus arm should play in right field. Off the mound, Brown reaches 90 mph from the left side to go along with a promising hard slurve and some feel for a changeup. He could be a strong two-way player if he honors his commitment to Pepperdine.

150. Riley Moore, c
San Marcos HS, Santa Barbara, Calif.
As a rising high school senior last summer, Moore played in 11 games in the California Collegiate League and caught power arms like Texas State's Carson Smith and Texas' Sam Stafford and Hoby Milner. He held his own in the Area Code Games and in fall scout ball, but he has seen little to hit on a bad high school team this spring. Lanky and wiry-strong at 6-foot-2, 170 pounds, Moore has a chance to be a fringe-average lefthanded hitter with average or better power as he fills out his projectable frame. He's a switch-hitter who struggles from the right side, and scouts still are not completely sold on his bat. Moore, who is committed to Arizona, stands out most for his defense. His athleticism plays well behind the plate, where he has excellent agility and advanced receiving skills for his age. His best tool is his above-average arm.