Draft Scouting Reports: No. 101-200




#101 DAVID NICK, SS, CYPRESS (CALIF.) HS
Cypress High in Orange County is a top-notch program that has recently produced first-rounders Scott Moore (2002) and Josh Vitters (2007). Nick doesn't figure to be drafted quite that high, but he is an outstanding player nonetheless. A 6-foot-2 high school shortstop, Nick will probably move to second base in pro ball. He doesn't have the arm, hands or actions to hold down shortstop beyond college, but second should be a perfect fit. Nick is an excellent all-around athlete, with one of the most interesting batting stances seen in years. Eschewing modern hitting theory, he stands dead still at the plate, with his feet spread and the bat held above his back shoulder. Motionless as the pitch comes in, he turns on the ball by whipping the bat and snapping his wrists violently at the last instant. No one would be foolish enough to compare a high schooler to Joe DiMaggio, but Nick's swing is a near copy. And it gets results. Nick is a line-drive hitter, and the ball screams off his bat when he squares a pitch up. The only concern with Nick is that his terrific quickness will at times cause him to pull off the ball too soon, imparting topspin to the ball. As a professional, Nick profiles as an offense-oriented second baseman with average defensive skills, above-average speed, average power, and potentially well-above-average hitting skills.
 
 
#102 ASHUR TOLLIVER, LHP, OKLAHOMA CITY
NAIA power Oklahoma City usually has an interesting NCAA Division I transfer, and this year's prospect is Tolliver. He went just 2-5, 7.94 at Arkansas-Little Rock in 2008, but started to blossom in the Cape Cod League during the summer. He drew a lot of attention when his fastball sat in the low 90s and popped some 96s early in the spring, though he was working more at 88-92 mph as the draft approached. Scouts wonder about his durability because he's generously listed at 6 feet and 170 pounds. He has a very quick arm, though there's also effort in his delivery, and he ultimately may wind up in the bullpen. Tolliver's second-best pitch currently is his changeup. He showed some feel for a curveball in the fall but now employs a slurvy slider in the low 80s. He has a chance to become the highest-drafted player in Stars history, surpassing Grant Hansen, who went 89th overall to the White Sox in 2003. But Tolliver didn't help his chances by giving up eight runs in three innings against Louisiana State-Shreveport in the first round of the NAIA playoffs.
 
 
#103 DYLAN FLORO, RHP, BUHACH COLONY HS, ATWARER, CALIF.
Many clubs had Floro pegged as a supplemental first-rounder when the spring began, and while his velocity has dipped this spring he still isn't likely to last much past the second round. Slightly undersized at 6-foot-1 and 170 pounds, Floro has a long track record with local and national scouts. He still sits at 90-92 mph with his fastball, and he adds a changeup to his mix, but his best offering may be his tight, high 70s slider, which has the makings of a plus pitch. Floro is committed to Cal State Fullerton and might be well served by three years of college experience, but he may find it hard to pass on signing if he goes in the second round.
 
 
#104 TYLER KEHRER, LHP, EASTERN ILLINOIS
Kehrer went just 1-5, 5.02 as a sophomore in 2008, but he hinted at his potential by battling Eastern Kentucky's Christian Friedrich (who became the Rockies' first-round pick) and Jacksonville State's Ben Tootle, the Ohio Valley Conference's two best arms, to draws. While he's still somewhat of a work in progress, Kehrer's fastball has sat at 90-93 mph for most of his starts this spring, and he carries that velocity into the late innings. He has improved his slider to the point where it's an average pitch. He helped his cause by delivering a 14-strikeout one-hitter against Southern Illinois-Edwardsville in front of several scouts. How much progress Kehrer can make with the consistency of his changeup and command will determine whether he remains a starter in pro ball. He's a strong 6-foot-3 and 210 pounds, and his fastball would play up in shorter relief stints. If Kehrer goes in the third round, he'd be Eastern Illinois' highest draft pick since the Athletics took Stan Royer 16th overall in 1988.
 
 
#105 DEL HOWELL, LHP, ALABAMA
Like many college pitchers this spring, Howell's draft stock has been volatile. Recruited as a two-way player, Howell shined as a pitcher in the Texas Collegiate League last summer and earned top prospect honors there, striking out 47 in 34 innings. Alabama intended to use him as a reliever this year, in a middle-relief, "moment of truth" role, but he wasn't 100 percent healthy as he recovered from a case of mononucleosis. In an effort to make up for lost innings, Alabama used Howell as a starter early in the season, and he flashed above-average stuff, including dominating Vanderbilt in a complete-game effort. His fastball touched 94 in relief last summer and sat at 89-92 mph at its best this spring. He's got natural sink and tail on the fastball as well and complements it with a good, hard slider in the low 80s. In relief, Howell was a two-pitch guy, but he flashed an average changeup this spring. He has thrown fewer than 100 innings in college, making him an intriguing, fresh arm for scouts who have seen him throw well. He doesn't have the innings under his belt to know how to get out of jams or fight through innings when he doesn't have his best stuff. He could go anywhere from the second to the fourth round.
 
 
#106 JAKE BARRETT, RHP, DESERT RIDGE HS, MESA, ARIZ.
A horse at 6-foot-4 and 230 pounds, Barrett made the showcase rounds last summer and fall, first with Team USA, then to the Area Code Games and then down to Jupiter, Fla. for the World Wood Bat Tournament with the Rays scout team. Despite pitching nearly year-round, he hasn't showed signs of slowing up this spring. The Arizona State recruit has pitched at 90-92 mph with his fastball and can dial it up to 94, leading his team to a 5-A-II state championship. It's a heavy fastball and Barrett is aggressive on the mound. He has tightened up his curveball that he throws in the upper 70s, and he can throw it for strikes. He hasn't needed a changeup much as an amateur, but it has the potential to be an average pitch as it continues to develop. Barrett is a hard worker who has gotten into better shape this spring.
 
 
#107 JEREMY HAZELBAKER, OF, BALL STATE
Hazelbaker hit .246 with 31 errors at second base in his first two seasons at Ball State, but earned all-star honors as an outfielder in the Great Lakes League last summer. Even then, no one expected him to rank among the NCAA Division I leaders in batting (.429), runs (77), hits (87), triples (nine), total bases (147), walks (48), on-base percentage (.550), slugging percentage (.724) and steals (29). He's a totally different hitter now, as he has stopped trying to pull everything and focused on using the entire field and letting his considerable speed work for him. A 65 runner out of the box on the 20-80 scouting scale—he grades as a 70 once he gets going—Hazelbaker is adept a bunting, a skill that helped the lefty hitter bat .419 against southpaws. The 6-foot-3, 195-pounder also has deceptive strength, hitting for the cycle against Kent State (doing most of the damage off prospect Brad Stillings) and driving some balls out of the park to the opposite field. Despite his strength, he understands his primary role as a leadoff hitter is to get on base and create havoc. His speed also allows him to chase down balls in center field, where his arm is playable. He made seven errors this spring, though it was his first year as a full-time outfielder. His limited track record bothers some scouts, but there aren't many college prospects in this draft who are legitimate up-the-middle players and have performed, so he could get picked as high as the third round.
 
 
#108 DONNIE JOSEPH, LHP, HOUSTON
Joseph had little success in his first two years at Houston, bouncing between roles while battling his control and command. He finally harnessed his arm strength this spring, posting a 2.16 ERA, 11 saves and 75 strikeouts in 50 innings. The athletic 6-foot-3, 185-pounder now works consistently with a lively 90-93 mph fastball after often having to dial it down to 87-90 to find the plate in the past. He also has come up with a reliable breaking ball, a hard slider that gives him two legitimate weapons for pro ball. Joseph still doesn't have a trustworthy offspeed pitch and his control still isn't sterling, so he profiles to remain a reliever at the next level. He has enough stuff to be much more than a lefty specialist, and he should go somewhere between the third and fifth rounds.
 
 
#109 COLTON CAIN, LHP, WAXAHACHIE (TEXAS) HS
On the right day, Cain can look like a first-rounder. He's a strong 6-foot-3, 225-pound lefthander who has can sit in the low 90s for a few innings and touch 94 mph with his fastball. He has improved his curveball to the point where some area scouts grades it as an average pitch and project it as a plus offering. He also has a strong track record, having starred with the U.S. youth and junior teams the previous two summers. Scouts who aren't as high on Cain have seen him overthrow trying to pitch to the radar gun, and didn't think as highly of his breaking ball or arm action. If Cain attends Texas, he may get more of an opportunity to contribute initially in the lineup than on a crowded pitching staff. He's a first baseman with plenty of strength and lefthanded power potential. He made more of an impression at the Area Code Games last summer with his bat, though scouts now prefer him more as a pitcher. They have some questions about his ability with wood bats and his defense. Cain reportedly wants a seven-figure bonus, which may be a bit rich for pro clubs.
 
 
#110 BEN PAULSEN, 1B, CLEMSON
Paulsen's father Tom Riginos is Clemson's assistant coach and recruiting coordinator, and Paulsen has made him proud by being the Tigers' best hitter this season. He's more of a hitter in the Mark Grace mold, with a smooth lefthanded swing. He uses the whole field and ranked second in the ACC (behind only Dustin Ackley) in hits. Paulsen's ultimate value is tied to his power; he's just an average defender and is limited to first base. His lack of patience at the plate works against him in terms of getting to his power, as at times he doesn't work himself into power hitter's counts. Teams that focus on his strong Cape Cod League performance (.290/.335/.497, eight home runs) could pop Paulsen as high as the third round. Skeptics will recall Michael Johnson, a Clemson first baseman drafted 54th overall in 2002 whose slider bat speed made him a 4-A player.
 
 
#111 ROBBIE SHIELDS, SS, FLORIDA SOUTHERN
Shields wasn't highly recruited despite a strong senior season in high school, when he hit 18 homers for Pasco High. He wound up at Division II Florida Southern and was having a solid college career, hitting .348 as a sophomore with nine home runs. Still, he was not a well-known commodity before he went to the Cape Cod League. In a short stint with Cotuit, he burst on the scene as a potential first-round pick. Ten games into his stint there, he was hitting .429 with two home runs, but a hurt his right wrist sliding head-first into third base. He wound up staying for five more games before shutting down his summer with what proved to be a hairline fracture and some ligament damage. Shields has had plenty of scrutiny this season as the top talent in the competitive Sunshine State Conference and has had some draftitis, as he had just five homers after hitting 17 in his first two seasons. Shields showed early-round tools with strength in his hands, average speed and middle-infield actions, but he's more likely an offensive second baseman or perhaps a third baseman in the David Bell mode rather than a true shortstop. His modest spring performance likely drops him into the third-round range, but he still has a shot to challenge the second-round record set by Moccasins alumni Lance Niekro (1999) and Brett Tomko (1995).
 
 
#112 ANDREW SUSAC, C, JESUIT HS, SACRAMENTO
In a draft year bursting with promising high school catchers, Susac may be the best catch-and-throw receiver available. Big, strong and physical at 6-foot-2 and 220 pounds, Susac uses his quick release and powerful throwing arm to consistently record pop times in the 1.85- to 1.90-second range. Scouts look for catchers who are comfortable behind the plate, and whose receiving style is quiet and relaxed. Susac rates highly in both categories, showing the ability to handle all types of pitches in all locations with ease. Where he ends up getting picked will depend on how much a team believes in his bat. At times this spring, his balance was poor at the plate, he lunged at pitches and his timing was off. He has home run power potential, but he will need to made significant strides as a hitter. But Susac's catch and throw skills alone will carry him into the early rounds of the draft.
 
 
#113 RYAN BERRY, RHP, RICE
Berry doesn't have Stephen Strasburg's stuff, but he was the second-best pitcher in college baseball before he got hurt in mid-March. In consecutive complete-game wins over Texas A&M, Notre Dame and San Diego, he allowed just five hits, an unearned run and no walks while striking out 28. Then he strained a muscle beneath his pitching shoulder in his next start, which sidelined him for five weeks. The Owls eased him back slowly into the rotation and he looked like his early-season self in the Conference USA tournament, firing a two-hitter against Alabama-Birmingham. Two days later, he pitched the ninth inning to save the championship game. Berry's lone plus pitch is his knuckle-curve, yet he took a step forward this spring when he stopped relying on it so much. He has done a better job of throwing his 88-91 mph fastball to both sides of the plate to set up his curve, and he also mixes in a slider and changeup. His fastball has good life and touches 93 at times. He's not physical at 6-foot-1 and 195 pounds, but he does a good job of repeating his delivery and throwing strikes. His mechanics bother some scouts, as he lands stiff and upright, putting stress on his arm. While Berry's resurgence has him moving back up draft boards, it remains to be seen whether a club will take him high enough (top two rounds) to sign him. Before he was sidelined, teams already were leery of the health of Rice pitchers. Six of the eight Owls pitchers drafted in the first or supplemental first round this decade (Kenny Baugh, Jon Skaggs, Philip Humber, Jeff Niemann, Wade Townsend, Joe Savery) have had elbow or shoulder surgery in college or early in their pro careers.
 
 
#114 DAVID HOLMBERG, LHP, PORT CHARLOTTE (FLA.) HS
Florida's recruiting class includes the nation's top two prep lefties in Holmberg, who led the state in strikeouts as a junior, and Patrick Schuster, who threw four no-hitters this spring. Holmberg is teammates with Ricky Knapp, the son of Tigers pitching coach Rick Knapp, and the elder Knapp has helped Holmberg along the way with everything from conditioning drills to advice on the draft process. Thanks to his size and pro approach, Holmberg surpasses Schuster as the better pro prospect thanks. He's all of 6-foot-4 if not a bit taller and has a big frame, easily capable of carrying 225 pounds or so. His fastball has improved over the past year, sitting at 87-88 mph and at times hitting 90. His secondary stuff is his current calling card, and depending on the day he showed both a plus changeup and a curveball with 12-to-6 break and depth. Some scouts even like his slider better than his curveball, but the key is he throws all four for strikes. Holmberg was considered a difficult sign thanks to his Florida commitment, strong academic background and lack of present fastball velocity. However, he has the talent to go in the first five rounds to a team that believes his fastball will become an average-to-plus pitch.
 
 
#115 STEVE MATZ, LHP, MELVILLE HS, SETAUKET, N.Y.
The consensus top prep pitching prospect in the Northeast, Matz offers plenty of projection as well as good present stuff. For most of the spring, Matz sat in the 89-91 mph range, but he routinely ran his fastball up to 93-94, and the pitch has some glove-side life. Scouts particularly like the way he attacks hitters inside with his heater. He also shows a solid-average changeup with good deception that sometimes rates as plus. He began throwing a slider midway through the season, but most scouts prefer his 73-75 mph three-quarters curveball, which flashes average to plus but more often rates as a below-average offering at this stage. Matz has a big, projectable frame at 6-foot-3, 185 pounds, but there are some questions about his durability because he had trouble staying healthy for a full season until this year. He also needs to work on his delivery, as he tends to cut himself off and has a head jerk. There is some risk with Matz, but he has enough upside that some team is very likely to take him in the top three rounds and buy him out of a commitment to Coastal Carolina.
 
 
#116 JOSH FELLHAUER, OF, CAL STATE FULLERTON
Fellhauer is one of the more exciting and dynamic players in college baseball. Similar to Lenny Dykstra in his build and playing style, Fellhauer has emerged as the best player on one of the nation's top college teams. Fans of the College World Series may remember the sensational throw Fellhauer made in 2007 to nail UC Irvine's Taylor Holliday at home plate to temporarily stave off defeat in the longest game in CWS history. Fellhauer seems to have baseball in his genetic code. His grandfather pitched for two years in the St. Louis Browns organization in the early 1950s, and his dad was a sixth-round draft pick of the Athletics years later. An alumni of the 2008 college national team, Fellhauer tied for the team lead with 26 hits and finished second on the team with a .299 average. He had performed even better this spring. Fellhauer is one of the finest defensive outfielders in the nation, showing the ability to run down drives in front of him, over his head and in the gaps. His excellent arm is made more effective by his accuracy and quick release. Fellhauer exhibits a quick bat and the ability to rip line drives to all fields. He projects as an average to above-average hitter, though his home run power is below-average. Fellhauer's lack of size and power may depress his draft stock, and some scouts have placed the dreaded "fourth outfielder" tag on him, but if he proves he can hit in the minors he should be a reliable big league starter.
 
 
#117 JAKE ELIOPOULOS, LHP, SACRED HEART CATHOLIC HS, LaSALLE, ONT.
It's a down year in general for Canada. Unlike the past two years, there won't be a first-rounder from the Great White North, but Eliopoulos will likely be the highest-drafted player from Ontario since Scott Thorman was a first-round pick in 2000. Jim Eliopoulos, a catcher on the 1984 Canadian Olympic team, adopted Jake from Ukraine as a baby. At 6-foot-3 and 170 pounds, Eliopoulos is long and lean with room for projection. He's also young in a lot of regards, which scouts like. He looks young in the face, leading them to believe he'll fill out and add velocity and, being from Canada, he doesn't have the mileage on his arm that a similar pitcher in California or Florida might have. Eliopoulos' fastball currently sits in the 88-91 mph range with good life and movement. His mechanics are easy and clean and he also throws a curveball with some late depth and a changeup that is above-average for a high school pitcher. While nothing really jumps out about Eliopoulos, he's a complete package.
 
 
#118 ROBERT STOCK, RHP/C, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Stock is one of the draft's most intriguing players due to his background. He was Baseball America's Youth Player of the Year in 2005 when he was 15, and a year later, Stock skipped his senior year in high school to enroll at Southern California. He's a 19-year-old draft-eligible junior, and his college career has been one of valleys and recent peaks. He was the Trojans' starting catcher and sometime closer his first two seasons, showing modest power, a good fastball and good catch-and-throw skills. He showed raw power and catch-and-throw tools in his first two seasons, particularly arm strength. However, his draft stock suffered; after ranking No. 5 in our Cape Cod League Top 30 following his freshman season, he didn't even make the top 30 last summer, and scouts were stunned by his poor performance on scout day in fall 2008, when his bat looked slow and his pop times sluggish. When Stock got off to a slow start offensively in 2009, attention shifted to his performance on the mound. The Trojans turned to Stock as a starter this year, and he has delivered. He made his first start March 29 and beat Arizona State, striking out 10 in five innings, and hasn't looked back, registering a complete-game win at Arizona and showing surprising polish. His delivery is fairly easy, giving him good control of an 88-92 mph fastball that can hit 95 and a surprisingly good changeup that some scouts consider a plus pitch. His low-80s breaking ball also grades out as average, and Stock now figures to go out in the first three rounds as a pitcher—if he proves signable.

 
 
#119 REGGIE WILLIAMS JR., OF, BROOKS-DEBARTOLO COLLEGIATE HS, TAMPA
Williams' father Reggie spent parts of four seasons in the major leagues with the Angels and Dodgers and played pro ball until 2001. The younger Williams has been a baseball enigma in some ways, as he didn't play high school baseball as a sophomore and junior. Instead, he focused on playing for his father's travel team, the Tampa-based Dawg Pound. This spring, he and his brother Jadamion (J.D.), a top 2010 prospect, suited up for Brooks DeBartolo Collegiate HS, a first-year charter school program in North Tampa founded by NFL linebacker Derrick Brooks and NFL ownership family the DeBartolos, formerly of the San Francisco 49ers. No matter where he played Williams' speed and bloodlines attracted interest, as he committed to Miami. Long and athletic at 6-foot-4, 190 pounds, Williams is a switch-hitter with speed, rating as a 70 runner on the 20-80 scale for most scouts. He's shown some 80 times as well such as running a 6.2-second 60, according to his high school coach, and 3.9-second times to first base. He led the state of Florida with 59 steals this spring in just 20 games while hitting .604. Williams' bat will be the question, as he's drawn some Gary Matthews Jr. comparisons both physically and in terms of his future potential. He hasn't shown much present power despite being an older prep senior (he'll turn 20 in the fall) as he hit only one home run this spring. The Yankees and Blue Jays worked Williams out this spring, and he even got hitting tips from Toronto manager Cito Gaston.
 
 
#120 COHL WALLA, OF, LAKE TRAVIS HS, AUSTIN
Walla earned all-state honors at wide receiver as Lake Travis won the Texas 4-A state football title in the fall of 2007, catching 68 passes for 1,072 yards and 13 touchdowns. He hasn't played football since, skipping his senior season on the gridiron to focus on baseball. That decision should prove to be wise, though questionable signability could drop him out of the early rounds this June and make him more of a prime draft prospect for 2012. Walla is an extremely athletic 6-foot-4, 170-pounder with the room to add plenty of muscle. He's wiry strong and shows raw power with an easy righthanded swing, but he hasn't hit as well as a senior as he did as a junior. Walla has above-average speed and plays a solid center field. He even offers arm strength, as he has shown an 88-91 mph fastball and flashed a hammer curveball on the mound. He's more of a thrower than a pitcher, however, and scouts prefer him as a position player. Walla verbally committed to Texas Christian before changing his mind and opting for Texas. He may not be signable outside of the first two rounds, but his talent fits more in the fourth- to sixth-round area for now.
 
 
#121 JABARI BLASH, OF, MIAMI DADE JC
Blash played some high school baseball in the Virgin Islands, enough to try to use baseball to go to college in the U.S. mainland. He attended Alcorn State for a year but wasn't academically eligible, due to transcript issues. He redshirted that season, then wound up transferring to Miami-Dade JC, where he didn't even earn a starting job when the season started. He's quite raw and has holes in his swing, owing in part to his large 6-foot-5, 210-pound frame. He also has big-time tools, and several observers called him Florida's best five-tool prospect. Blash has plus raw power, with 10 homers in just 102 at-bats this season, and above-average speed (he runs the 60 in 6.7 seconds) and throwing arm (it's a right field arm, if not the cannon reported earlier this spring). Some scouts dream on Blash's frame and see a future Jermaine Dye, who also was a JC player.
 
 
#122 STEPHEN PEREZ, SS, GULLIVER PREP, MIAMI
Perez is signed to play for the Miami Hurricanes, where his high school coach, Javy Rodriguez, starred for several seasons, starting for the 2001 national championship team. Perez has a better body than Rodriguez and seems to have picked up some of his coach's savvy. He's more frequently compared to Deven Marrero, his Florida prep contemporary. Perez has more present hitting ability, showing off his surprising pop last summer during the home run derby prior to the Under Armour/Baseball Factor all-star game. Perez also has some juice from both sides of the plate, as he's quick to the ball, balanced in his stance and athletic. Perez has a 60 arm that should be sufficient for shortstop. The only negatives for the 5-foot-10, 165-pounder are his lack of physical projection and big man's hitting approach. At times Perez too much power for his own good, as he fares better when he uses the whole field. He's a fringe-average runner, and while his arm profiles at shortstop, his range fits better at second. Those doubts and his Miami commitment were clouding his signability as May drew to a close.
 
 
#123 DEVEN MARRERO, SS, AMERICAN HERITAGE HS, PLANTATION, FLA.
Scouts have seen plenty of Marrero over the years, from his freshman year in high school, when his brother Chris became the Nationals' second-round pick, to last year, when American Heritage produced first-rounder Eric Hosmer (Royals), catcher Adrian Nieto (Nationals, fifth round) and righthander Juan Carlos Sulbaran (Reds, 30th, $500,000). Marrero has carved out a bit of his own nichr this spring, showing improved strength to go with his excellent defensive skills and leading Heritage to a state runner-up finish. He's a more well-rounded player than his brother, who moved down the defensive spectrum quickly. Marrero started slowly this spring but picked up his offense as the season went along. Present hitting ability is his biggest question, as his swing has some length to it. His swing also has leverage, though; while scouts project him to hit for power down the line, he's short in that department now, and he's only an average runner. Defensively, he has a plus arm, smooth footwork and above-average hands. He should have no trouble staying at shortstop, as he plays the game smoothly. He's a baseball player in the best sense, even closing for American Heritage when needed. Marrero's slow start cooled some of the ardor for him in the scouting community, and word in the South Florida area is that he intended to honor his commitment to Arizona State, where he was expected to start from day one.
 
 
#124 RUBEN SIERRA JR., OF, SAN JUAN (P.R.) EDUCATIONAL SCHOOL
Like his father, Sierra passes scouts' eye test, standing 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds with room to fill out. As that happens, Sierra will likely have to move from center field to right field. He certainly has the arm strength for right—his throws from the outfield have been clocked at 92 mph. His other tools are impressive as well. He runs a 6.4-second 60-yard dash and can put on a show during batting practice. It's a different story, however, against live pitching. As a lefthanded hitter, Sierra has a tendency to bail out—his step is toward first base—causing him to become exposed against pitches away. Despite his natural tools, Sierra sometimes looks like he's just going through the motions. Still, teams that value tools and projection are dreaming on Sierra, and he's seen as a player who will greatly benefit from getting into pro ball, getting better instruction and playing every day.
 
 
#125 MARK FLEURY, C, NORTH CAROLINA
Fleury was a reserve and part-time DH for most of his first two seasons at North Carolina, then emerged as one of the Tar Heels' most important performers as a junior. He'd started every game this spring and led the team in RBIs while throwing out 33 percent of basestealers. Fleury's lefthanded bat and solid catch-and-throw skills should push him up draft boards, particularly with so few college catchers available. He doesn't have a standout tool, but he was one of the better all-around catchers in the Cape Cod League last summer and built on that this year. He's a patient hitter with solid-average power, and his discipline gives him a chance to have a solid hit tool as well. He hangs in well against lefthanded pitchers, having seen plenty in North Carolina's lefty-heavy lineup. Fleury's arm earns mixed reviews, with some scouts rating it above-average and others as solid-average. He has handled velocity well at North Carolina and earns plaudits from scouts for his leadership skills and ability to lead a pitching staff.
 
 
#126 JERRY SULLIVAN, RHP, ORAL ROBERTS
Sullivan has won all-conference honors and led Oral Roberts to the Summit League regular-season and tournament championships in each of his three college seasons, but coaches and scouts think he may just be scratching the surface of his potential. A top high school prospect for the 2006 draft before Tommy John surgery in November 2005 caused him to miss his senior season, Sullivan offers a nice combination of present stuff and future projection. His fastball sits in low 90s and touches 94 mph, and he does a good job of using his 6-foot-4, 220-pound frame to throw it downhill. His heater also features armside run, and he usually commands it well. He's still working on the consistency of his secondary pitches. When he's at his best, his slider is a slightly above-average pitch and his changeup is a plus offering. A strong, well-conditioned athlete, he repeats his delivery well and throws strikes. Sullivan, who has pitched well in two summers in the Cape Cod League, slumped slightly as a sophomore before bouncing back this spring. A potential No. 3 starter in the majors, he figures to get drafted between the third and fifth rounds.
 
 
#127 JOHN STILSON, RHP, TEXARKANA (TEXAS) JC
Stilson has emerged as the top juco prospect in Texas this spring despite not showing enough to warrant making area scouts' follow lists last fall. A three-sport star at Texas High in Texarkana, he hurt his shoulder in his senior football season and it continued to bother him until he had surgery in July 2008. He wasn't 100 percent during fall practice while trying to work his way into Texarkana JC's plans as a middle infielder and pitcher. His future definitely is on the mound, as he has gone from topping out at 88 mph last fall to pitching at 88-90 mph early this spring to repeatedly topping out at 95 mph down the stretch. Though the 6-foot-3, 180-pounder is athletic—he shows good actions and has some pop as a shortstop—there's also a lot of effort in his delivery. He'll need to smooth out his mechanics to improve his command and the consistency of his hard breaking ball, which is a true, hard slider at times. Stilson doesn't have much of a changeup either, but he's also just in his formative stages as a pitcher. He projects as a fourth- to seventh-rounder, though he may not be signable at the low end of that range. He'll return to Texarkana for his sophomore season if he doesn't turn pro.
 
 
#128 JAMES JONES, LHP/OF, LONG ISLAND
After a standout fall, Jones entered the season as a potential top-two-rounds pick as a lefthander, but he struggled mightily in the Northeast Conference, going 1-9, 7.40. He still earned all-conference honors as an outfielder/first baseman, batting .364/.453/.618 with nine homers, 32 RBIs and 20 stolen bases in 23 tries. Most scouts still prefer Jones as a pitcher, but some consider him a third- to fourth-round talent as a corner outfielder. A gifted athlete with a lanky 6-foot-3, 185-pound frame, Jones garners physical comparisons to Mike Cameron and Adam Jones. He has quick hands and projects to hit for power down the road, and he shows good pitch recognition and plate discipline. He also has good instincts in the outfield. Jones' athleticism also makes him intriguing as a pitcher, despite his poor numbers. Multiple scouts have said Jones has one of the quickest arms they have ever seen, and everyone agrees that his arm action is exceptionally clean and loose, though his mechanics need plenty of work, as he tends to over-stride, causing his stuff to flatten out. Jones ran his fastball up to 94-95 in the fall but pitched mostly in the 88-93 range this spring, usually sitting around 91. He throws a curveball and a slider, and both rate as below-average pitches, though he flashes an average breaking ball every once in a while. The consensus is that he'd be better off scrapping the curveball and concentrating on developing the slider. Jones tends to slow down his delivery on his changeup, but he does have some feel for the pitch. Scouts unanimously laud Jones for his makeup; he works hard both on and off the field and is widely regarded as a great person. Few players in this draft are as intriguing as Jones, but he's very much a boom-or-bust prospect. He figures to be drafted in the third to fifth round, more likely as a pitcher.
 
 
#129 MICHAEL HELLER, RHP, CARDINAL MOONEY HS, SARASOTA, FLA.
Florida signed Heller—one of four Aflac All-Americans in the recruiting class, joining Austin Maddox, LeVon Washington and Michael Zunino—as an infielder/righthander, and his power and balanced swing would make him an effective two-way player in college. Pro scouts like him for his arm, though, which plays at shortstop but plays much better on the mound. Heller has one of the best arms in Florida, and he's perhaps the best combination of athleticism and arm strength among the Florida prep crop this year, exceeded perhaps only by Keyvius Sampson. Heller often sat in the 88-92 mph range with his fastball this spring, but at other times he showed exceptional stuff, with some reports he was hitting 97 mph and regular readings of 94-95 early. Heller has projection in his frame, so those radar-gun readings should become more consistent in the future. He uses a high three-quarters slot to throw an average curveball and nascent changeup. Heller's secondary pitches need work, both in terms of command and sharpness. Some scouts have concern that he has something of a head whack in his delivery that may be difficult to smooth out. It might take first three-round money to buy Heller out of his Gators commitment, as both his brothers went to school in Gainesville, as does his older brother.
 
 
#130 DEREK DENNIS, SS, FOREST HILLS CENTRAL HS, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.
Dennis has surpassed fellow Michigan shortstop recruit Daniel Fields as the Wolverine State's best prospect this spring. An athletic 6-foot-3, 175-pounder, Dennis was also an all-state guard in basketball, averaging 21.6 points a game as a senior and finishing his career as the leading scorer in Forest Hills Central's history. Scouts describe him as a cross between former Michigan high school product D.J. LeMahieu (now at Louisiana State) and former Wolverines shortstop Jason Christian (the Athletics' fifth-round pick in 2008). Dennis is a better athlete than LeMahieu but isn't quite as advanced as a hitter. He's no slouch at the plate, however, and Dennis has a long finish from the right side and uses the opposite field like LeMahieu does. He should develop at least solid power as he fills out his frame, and he has shown the ability to drive the ball with a wood bat. Dennis grades as an average runner, in part because he has a long swing and it takes him time to get out of the box, but he makes all the plays at shortstop. He has a quick first step, good range and a strong arm. The draft is thin on middle infielders and it's easy to dream on Dennis, so a team that likes him could pop him as early as the third round. He's considered a potential tough sign, though, and could slide much further. He strained his ribcage in mid-May, making it difficult for clubs to get a good look at him right before the draft.
 
 
#131 JORDAN HENRY, OF, MISSISSIPPI
Henry was a Freshman All-American two years ago, when his brother Justin (a second baseman who is now in the Tigers farm system) was a teammate, but he struggled as a sophomore for Mississippi. He rebounded to key the Rebels offense in 2009, leading the Southeastern Conference in walks and stolen bases to earn first-team All-SEC honors. Henry earns Jason Tyner comparisons for his slap-happy, speed-oriented approach. He's patient and can spoil pitchers' chase pitches with two strikes. He's a 70 runner whose speed also plays defensively, where he's a good defender in center field. Henry has enough arm to be a fourth outfielder, which is his likely future role unless he shows an ability to impact the ball with the bat. He has hit just two homers and has just 26 extra-base hits in three seasons. He could go as high as the fourth round due to his speed and improved performance this season.
 
 
#132 MARK APPEL, RHP, MONTE VISTA HS, DANVILLE, CALIF.
A projectable 6-foot-6 righthander, Appel typically got off to a late start in high school baseball due to his basketball commitments, and his lack of baseball time sometimes showed. In a start at a showcase event in Florida last October, for example, his fastball was in the high 80s to low 90s and he showed poor mechanics and command. Scouts report that looked much better this spring, when he threw a no-hitter and his fastball has peaked at 94 mph. Appel adds a curveball and changeup that have been serviceable but need refinement. He has a lot of potential but might be a tough sign because of his relative inexperience and commitment to Stanford pledge, so he could slide in the draft if teams don't think they can sign him in the first three or four rounds.
 
 
#133 JAKE COWAN, RHP, SAN JACINTO (TEXAS) JC
Despite a bout with elbow tendinitis that sidelined him for four weeks and cost him some sharpness on his pitches, Cowan has been plenty effective. He threw a complete-game one-hitter against Panola (Texas) JC in the regional playoffs, helping San Jacinto reach the Junior College World Series for the sixth time in the last eight seasons, and has the lowest ERA (1.66) in a deep Gators rotation. A 14th-round pick out of a Georgia high school by the Red Sox in 2007, Cowan spent 2008 at Virginia before transferring to San Jac. He worked with a low-90s fastball, but his arm problems have left him with a high-80s heater for much of the spring. An MRI revealed no structural damage, and Cowan should regain velocity once he fully recovers. There's also room for projection on his 6-foot-3, 175-pound frame. Cowan doesn't need to overpower hitters because the late boring action on his fastball makes it tough to square up, and he mixes four offerings. His slider is a low-80s strikeout pitch at its best, and he does a nice job of maintaining his arm speed when he throws his changeup, which has good fade and sink. His curveball is his fourth-best pitch, and it has some lost some velocity and tilt this spring, but it's still an effective offering. He has a clean delivery, so when he's 100 percent he can throw all four pitches for strikes. He also draws praise for his ability to compete without his best stuff. Cowan looked like a potential second-rounder in the fall. Though he's now more of a fourth- to sixth-rounder and has committed to Texas, he's still considered signable.
 
 
#134 BROOKS HALL, RHP, HANNA HS, ANDERSON, S.C.
Like Mississippi signee and top prep prospect David Renfroe, Hall would be an impact college player as a two-way option. He's a power bat at third base, though he lacks Renfroe's easy actions and feel for defense. He's much less of a prospect as a hitter than as a pitcher, where Hall was gaining some steam, especially after throwing a perfect game in March. Hall has good size and at times stays tall and uses his 6-foot-5 frame to his benefit, driving an 88-92 mph fastball down in the strike zone. At his best, he hit some 94s, and he also showed the ability to spin a power slider that could be a plus pitch. His frame has projection as well. His early helium peaked when he matched up with Mauldin High and righthander Madison Younginer, the top prospect in the Palmetto State, and Younginer won the matchup hands-down. Hall was limited in April to just hitting due to an biceps tendinitis injury, and scouts were starting to back off him considering his South Carolina commitment and bonus demands.
 
 
#135 SCOTT GRIGGS, RHP, SAN RAMON VALLEY HS, DANVILLE, CALIF.
A veteran of elite showcases such as the Aflac Classic and the Area Code Games, Griggs has long been familiar to area scouts in Northern California. A 6-foot-2 righthander, he has been inconsistent with his command this year, but his raw stuff is still impressive. Griggs' fastball tops out at 95 mph, sitting in the low 90s, and he spins off a excellent curveball. Some scouts don't think Griggs' control is good enough for him to go straight to pro ball and expect him to follow through on his commitment to UCLA. Because of that Griggs is considered a tough  sign and could join the Bruins unless he goes in the first two or three rounds.
 
 
#136 DEREK McCALLUM, 2B, MINNESOTA
McCallum is having the best offensive season of any Minnesota player since future big leaguer Robb Quinlan in 1998, entering NCAA regional play batting .404/.482/.737 with 17 homers and 79 RBIs. He foreshadowed his breakout with a strong summer in the Northwoods League, which he led with 81 hits while batting .328 with wood bats. McCallum handles the bat and controls the strike zone well, and he consistently generates hard line drives with a short lefthanded stroke. He had reached base in each of his last 42 games entering the regionals. His power has blossomed this spring, and he drilled six homers in one five-game stretch after hitting five in his first two seasons. The 6-foot, 190-pound McCallum played hockey in high school and brings that kind of mentality to the diamond. He played second base as a freshman and shortstop as a sophomore, and he has looked more comfortable after moving back to second this spring. Though he's a below-average runner, he has a quick first step, range to both sides and a good arm for the position. He shows keen instincts in all aspects of the game. A club that sees McCallum as a poor man's Chase Utley could take him in the fourth round.
 
 
#137 GARRETT RICHARDS, RHP, OKLAHOMA
The state of Oklahoma is loaded with pitching prospects this year, and no one has stuff as unhittable or a performance as mystifying as Richards. He routinely sits at 93-95 mph with life on his fastball and touched 98 in a relief outing against Wichita State. He has a mid-80s slider with bite that peaked at 89 mph against the Shockers. And if that's not enough, he has a power curveball and flashes an effective changeup. He has a quick arm, a strong 6-foot-2, 217-pound build and throws on a downhill plane with little effort. Yet Richards never has posted an ERA lower than 6.30 in three college seasons, and opponents had batted .281 with 10 homers against him entering NCAA regional play. "It's unbelievable that he gets hit," one scout said. Outside of a stint in the Alaska League last summer, Richards never has harnessed his wicked stuff on anything approaching a consistent basis. He has trouble throwing strikes and flies open in his delivery, allowing hitters a good look at what's coming. He has the raw ingredients to become a frontline starter, and on the rare occasions when he has command, he looks like an easy first-round pick. Where he'll actually go in the draft and whether he'll ever put everything together remain to be seen.
 
 
#138 TYLER BLANDFORD, RHP, OKLAHOMA STATE
Blandford easily had the best stuff and worst control on a deep Oklahoma State staff that underachieved this season as the Cowboys couldn't even qualify for the Big 12 tournament. He's similar to Garrett Richards of archrival Oklahoma, with a 6-foot-2, 215-pound build, power stuff and little idea how to locate it. His 93-95 mph fastball and his hard slider are both swing-and-miss pitches when they're close enough to the strike zone. He can reach 97 with his fastball, though it's fairly straight. The bite on is slider is inconsistent, and he's working on a changeup but must command his heater better to set it up. Blandford's control has gotten worse in each of his three seasons at Oklahoma State. His best outing of the year was a two-hitter against Oklahoma and Richards in which Blandford struck out a career-high 12 batters—and required 166 pitches to get 25 outs. On stuff alone, he wouldn't last past the second round. He'll probably last at least two rounds longer, and he profiles better as a reliever than as a starter in pro ball.
 
 
#139 BRIAN MORGADO, LHP, TENNESSEE
A prominent recruit out of the Miami area, Morgado missed his freshman season after having had Tommy John surgery on Oct. 9, 2006. As he redshirted, coach Rod Delmonico, who recruited him (and several other Miami area players over the years) was fired. But Morgado stuck it out and stayed at Tennessee. Coming back from the surgery, Morgado struggled working as a starter and eventually moved to the bullpen. There Morgado's arm strength played up, though he still didn't dominate. His fastball, a 90-93 mph pitch as a starter, sat in the 92-95 range from the bullpen, and he ran it up to 97 against Louisiana State. He lacked the fastball command or even control to be pitch efficient and go deep into games as a starter, but his fastball control improved in short relief. Morgado's offspeed stuff, fringe-average with fringy control as a starter, played up out the pen as well, as he threw more strikes with his power slider, an average pitch. He tends to pitch off emotion and needs to mature in that regard if he's to be anything more than a setup man as a pro. An eligible sophomore, Morgado was expected to be a reasonably easy sign as the Volunteers program looks to clean house after a miserable season.
 
 
#140 TANNER BUSHUE, RHP, SOUTH CENTRAL HS, FARINA, ILL.
A sprained right knee that didn't require surgery caused Bushue to miss most of his junior season and the summer showcase circuit in 2008, severely limiting his exposure. Now that he's healthy again, he has vaulted past lefthanders Ian Krol (Neuqua Valley HS, Naperville) and Jerad Grundy (Johnsburg HS) as the best prep prospect—and perhaps the top draft pick—in Illinois this spring. An all-area basketball player who averaged 18.2 points per game as a senior, Bushue is just beginning to realize his potential on the diamond. An extremely athletic 6-foot-4, 180-pounder, he repeats his delivery well and throws with little effort. That allows him to maintain his 88-90 mph fastball into the late innings, and he can reach 93 mph with the promise of more to come. Bushue's curveball is a solid-average pitch, though he needs to use it more often, and he also messes around with a slider. He hasn't made much progress with a changeup, a pitch he'll need to remain a starter at higher levels. He has signed with John A. Logan (Ill.) CC rather than a four-year school and should be signable in the first 10 rounds. A team that believes in his upside could pop Bushue as early as the fourth round.
 
 
#141 MATT GRAHAM, RHP, OAK RIDGE HS, CONROE, TEXAS
Texas area scouts still haven't figured Graham out. He excited them when he emerged as a potential first-rounder in the summer and fall before his junior season, but he has had a Jekyll-and-Hyde ride since. His velocity plunged to the mid-80s at the start of last summer, though it had crept up to the low 90s by the end of the showcase circuit. This spring, Graham has had outings where his fastball has sat at 86-88 mph and others where it has parked at 90-93 mph. He'll mix a power curveball with some ineffective breaking balls, and he's show the makings of an effective changeup but doesn't use it often enough. Graham has an athletic 6-foot-3, 195-pound frame but he throws with a herky-jerky delivery that contains a lot of effort. He needs to clean up and repeat his mechanics, and to improve control that's as inconsistent as his stuff. Graham has committed to North Carolina but may be signable if drafted in the first five rounds.
 
 
#142 CHRISTIAN JONES, LHP, MONTE VISTA HS, DANVILLE, CALIF.
Jones has emerged as the best prep lefthander in Northern California this year. A projectable 6-foot-4, 180-pounder, Jones has impressed scouts with a loose arm and easy motion, though some scouts worry about his near slingshot delivery. Jones commands his 88-91 mph fastball well, and while it doesn't exhibit a great deal of sink he does get some side-to-side movement on it. He dabbles with changeup but has rarely used it in high school. The best pitch in Jones' arsenal is probably his slurvy slider, which one scout described as "one of the dirtiest I've ever seen." Jones is committed to Oregon and reportedly considered entering school early to get a jump start on his college career. Considered a tough sign, he projects as a fourth- to eighth rounder in 2009, and many scouts think if he develops in college he could be a first-rounder in 2012.
 
 
#143 MYCAL JONES, SS, MIAMI DADE JC
Jones will be 22 by draft day, making him unusual for a junior-college player. But he has pro tools, and that combined with his polish should make him one of the country's first junior-college players selected. He spent two years at North Florida, being named to the Atlantic Sun Conference's all-freshman team as a redshirt in 2007 before being academically ineligible in 2008. Jones then transferred to Miami-Dade and was the conference player of the year as a fourth-year sophomore. His speed and defense will immediately play in pro ball; while he has 70 raw speed with 6.4-second 60 times, Jones' speed doesn't play offensively because he has more of an uppercut, power-oriented swing. He's athletic and has infield actions. Scouts are mixed on whether his average throwing arm will be enough for shortstop, and some question his range as well. He has enough strength and bat speed to hit for average as a pro, even if he doesn't maintain the power he has flashed with metal bats (he hit .447 with 13 homers this spring). Most scouts conservatively see Jones as a future utility infielder with possible Chone Figgins upside, but he could wind up an everyday shortstop. Teams that see him that way could take him as high as the fourth round.
 
 
#144 RYAN SCHIMPF, 2B/OF, LOUISIANA STATE
No one is projecting Schimpf as a future American League MVP, but his game is reminiscent of Dustin Pedroia's. Schimpf is a diminutive (listed at 5-foot-9, 181 pounds) second baseman who's a force at the plate. Schimpf would have led the Valley League in batting (.392) and slugging (.763) last summer if he hadn't fell short of qualifying because he arrived late from the College World Series, and he led Louisiana State with 17 homers entering NCAA regional play. Schimpf hits lefthanded and has a shorter stroke than Pedroia's, and uses excellent pitch recognition and quick wrists to repeatedly square up balls on the barrel of his bat. He's an aggressive hitter yet has walked (36) more than he has struck out (34) this spring. Schimpf has average speed and good instincts on the bases. He's a versatile defender who began this season at second base before shifting to the outfield so the Tigers could get freshman shortstop Austin Nola's glove into the lineup. Schimpf's bat profiles much better at second base and will be able to play there in pro ball. He's an adequate defender there, reliable if not spectacular. He has fringy arm strength and needs to work on his double-play pivot. Schimpf figures to get drafted between the fourth and seventh round.
 
 
#145 JOSH LEYLAND, C, SAN DIMAS (CALIF.) HS
Surefire high school hitters are a scare commodity in Southern California and throughout the 2009 draft class, and that helps Leyland stand out. A 6-foot-3, 225-pounder, he may be the most mature and fundamentally sound high school hitter in the state. In an early season game, one coach told his team of Leyland: "These guys have an Adam Dunn over there." Two homers later the same coach lamented, "I shouldn't have pitched to him." Leyland has average to above-average raw power, which has been on display at showcases nationwide. He has done more in those events than hammer the ball in BP, also showing his power in game action. Few high schoolers are as advanced fundamentally as Leyland. His stance is well balanced, and his swing is short to the ball and long afterward. Leyland does not run well, so first base or catcher will be his future defensive home. While not a polished catcher, his hands work decently at that spot. His arm is acceptable, though he'll need work on his catch and throw technique. Whatever position he plays, Leyland's bat will always be his trump card. Few high school hitters can match his blend of raw power and technical precision.
 
 
#146 MAX WALLA, OF, ALBUQUERQUE (N.M.) ACADEMY
Walla doesn't have the size, speed or arm that make him stand out on a baseball field. Then he steps into the batter's box and people stop what they're doing to watch. Walla can flat-out hit. Drawing comparisons to Jaff Decker, a supplemental first-round pick last year, Walla is similar in that he's 5-foot-11 and 195 pounds. Walla doesn't have the arm strength that Decker displays, but he has a better body. He's swam competitively since he was six years old and was part of his school's relay team that broke two state records this year. He has a compact swing and consistently hits balls on the sweet spot. Swinging from the left side, Walla generates considerable power for his size. Between his junior year in Albuquerque and the summer showcase circuit, Walla hit 51 home runs. His coach said that at a workout for some scouts this spring, they wanted to see him take 25 swings with a metal bat and then 25 with wood. He hit 18 home runs with the metal, switched to wood and hit 18 more over the fence. He was also a standout pitcher for his team this year, leading them to a state championship, but his future is as a hitter. A favorite of area scouts for his play and his makeup, Walla has been tough to crosscheck as a high school player in Albuquerque. If he grew up in the Phoenix area, like Decker, he would likely go a lot higher in the draft, but it's assumed he'll fall to around the fifth round, which could increase his chances of ending up at Oklahoma State.
 
 
#147 NOLAN ARENADO, C, EL TORO HS, LAKE FOREST, CALIF.
Arenado was far from impressive during the summer Area Code Games or the fall scout ball season last year. Flashes of power from his bat were negated by his soft frame, lack of speed and absence of athletic ability. But he has since transformed himself. Now strong and fit at 6-foot-1 and 210 pounds, Arenado's speed is still below-average, but he now exhibits a powerful throwing arm and greatly improved fielding actions. A high school shortstop, Arenado has no chance of staying there after graduation. His improved hands make third base a possibility, but catching is his most likely destination. His muscular build and howitzer arm appear to fit best behind the dish. Scouts are mixed on Arenado's hitting. He has powerful hands that enable him to drive the ball long distances, particularly to the opposite field. But there's some stiffness in his swing, and some scouts worry about his habit of getting too far out front with his front shoulder and arms.  Arenado's draft stock jumped during this year's National Classic, when he was named the tournament's most outstanding hitter and was by far the most dominant player. Arenado's power potential alone will get him into the early rounds, in spite of his defensive questions.
 
 
#148 DANIEL FIELDS, SS, UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT JESUIT HS
Fields' father Bruce had a brief major league career and won three minor league batting titles before becoming a hitting instructor. Currently the Indians' minor league hitting coordinator, he was the Tigers' big league batting coach in 2003 when Daniel hit a batting-practice homer at Comerica Park—as a 12-year-old, with a wood bat. In addition to good bloodlines, he has a body and a package of tools that scouts can dream on. He's 6-foot-3 and 200 pounds and offers a tantalizing combination of above-average power potential and speed. He's strong and has good lift in his lefthanded swing. Fields has less polish than might be expected of the son of a former big leaguer, but a strong spring has erased his reputation for being more of a showcase standout than a game performer. Fields is athletic, moves well and has a solid arm, but his size makes it likely that he'll move off shortstop at the next level. He projects better defensively as either a third baseman or an outfielder, and it's possible that he could play in center. Fields attends a prestigious private school and has committed to Michigan, so he probably won't be signable as a projected fourth- to seventh-round pick. He has the tools to blossom into a first-rounder after three years with the Wolverines.
 
 
#149 ALEX MCREE, LHP, GEORGIA
McRee was a crucial cog in Georgia's 2008 run to the College World Series finals, working as a lefthanded setup man. He made six starts during his first two seasons and 44 relief appearances, running his fastball into the mid-90s. His size (6-foot-6, 236 pounds) and velocity, plus being lefthanded, made McRee an easy target for scouts; scouting directors voted him a third-team All-American in the preseason. However, he had mononucleosis early in the season, and he's never gotten in a rhythm. While his fastball still has excellent life and downhill plane and has reached 94 mph, he has lacked consistency with it. He's pitching at 90-92 mph and still has a slurvy breaking ball, which some scouts want tightened up into a slider. His changeup has made significant strides, yet his pitchability has not. He was averaging 6.9 walks per nine innings and barely more than four innings per start, then got hammered for seven runs in less than an inning by Louisiana State in the Southeastern Conference tournament. McRee has a strong academic profile and has plans to go to medical school, and he wasn't expected to sign for less than supplemental first-round money. He hopes to return to school and replicate Joshua Fields' achievement of being a first-round pick as a senior out of Georgia.
 
 
#150 RENNY PARTHEMORE, RHP, CEDAR CLIFF (PA.) HS
The top prospect in a thin Pennsylvania crop, Parthemore's biggest asset is his projectability. His 6-foot-5, 185-pound frame and his quick arm hint at his considerable upside, and he has reached 93-94 mph in the past, though he worked mostly in the 88-91 range this spring. Parthemore's 12-to-6 curveball currently rates as an average pitch and projects to be plus. He also shows good feel for a changeup, giving him a chance for three average or better pitches down the road. Characteristic of a cold-weather high school pitcher, Parthemore's command comes and goes, and he tends to have trouble getting over his front side in his delivery, but there are no major red flags in his delivery. Some scouts question his competitive fire, but he has top-three-rounds potential. At this stage, however, it seems more likely Parthemore will honor his commitment to Penn State, where he could develop into a first-round pick in three years.
 
 
#151 AUSTIN KIRK, LHP, OWASSO (OKLA.) HS
Kirk led Owasso to the Oklahoma 6-A championship, making the Rams the Sooner State's first large school ever to win three straight league titles. He won three games in the final week of the state tournament, concluding with a four-hitter over Edmond's Santa Fe High in the finals for Owasso's ei ghth championship in the last 11 years. Kirk doesn't have a lot of projection remaining in his strong 6-foot-1, 200-pound frame, but he already has quality stuff for a lefthander. He surprised scouts by touching 92 mph in a February scrimmage against Tulsa's Memorial High and ace Jon Reed. Kirk has moved past Reed as the state's No. 2 high school prospect behind projected first-rounder Chad James (Yukon High) by pitching at 88-91 mph all spring after previously topping out in the high 80s. His fastball is explosive and gets on hitters quickly, making it appear even faster. He also consistently stays on top of his improved curveball with his high three-quarters delivery and has an advanced changeup for a high schooler. Kirk could go in the fourth or fifth round if teams believe he'll sign. If he doesn't, he'll head to Oklahoma and get the chance to contribute as a two-way player. He's a first baseman with some lefthanded power.
 
 
#152 HOBY MILNER, LHP, PASCHAL HS, FORT WORTH
Milner's father Brian is the only high school position player in the draft era who began his pro career in the major leagues. Brian fell to the Blue Jays in the seventh round of the 1978 draft because he had a scholarship to play baseball and football at Arizona State, but signed for a then-club record $150,000. He went for 4-for-9 in two big league games before heading to the minors, where injuries destroyed his career. Milner looks like the son of a former big leaguer, as he has clean, repeatable mechanics that allow him to command his pitches with ease. He throws a consistent 87-90 mph fastball with little effort, and it's easy to envision him adding velocity as he packs more strength on his skinny 6-foot-2, 155-pound frame. Milner's second pitch is a quality curveball, though he sometimes gets under it. With his aptitude, he should be able to develop a reliable changeup. The biggest caveat scouts have with Milner is that he got knocked around on the showcase circuit last summer and hasn't dominated lesser competition in high school. Unlike his father, he probably won't sign out of high school because his mother is adamant that he20follow through on a University of Texas scholarship. Milner's talent could fit him as high as the third or fourth round, but it may take a seven-figure bonus to sign him.
 
 
#153 TYLER LYONS, LHP, OKLAHOMA STATE
Lyons and Baylor's Kendal Volz led Team USA with matching 0.00 ERAs last summer, when the squad 24-0 and won the gold medal at the FISU World Championships in the Czech Republic. Both have seen their stuff dip and their draft stock significantly this spring. Lyons sat at 87-90 mph with his fastball as a sophomore and picked up a couple of mph as a Team USA reliever, but he has worked mostly at 86-87 mph in 2009. He's not hurt, though one scout noted that he has lost some of the extension in his delivery. His changeup has regressed, too, though it's still a solid-average pitch. Lyons has improved his curveball, which is now on par with his changeup. The 6-foot-2, 207-pounder still throw strikes, keeps the ball down in the zone and competes with a warrior mentality, so he still has put up the best numbers (6-5, 3.75) in Oklahoma State's rotation. As a savvy lefthander with solid stuff, Lyons had a chance to go in the second round. With a mediocre fastball, he's mor e of a fourth- or fifth-rounder.
 
 
#154 SCOOTER GENNETT, SS, SARASOTA (FLA.) HS
Sarasota High has produced 10 players drafted in the first five rounds over the last 20 years, and Gennett—whose real first-name is Ryan—should be the 11th. He helped the Sailors win a state title when he was a freshman in 2006. He isn't a conventional prospect in some ways but he has one of the more advanced bats in the draft, high school or college. He showed a strong, quick swing and advanced approach last summer, particularly impressing at the East Coast Showcase. He profiles as an offensive second baseman, while Florida State intends for him to start at shortstop as a freshman. He's a grinder with surprising power and bat speed for his size (a listed 5-foot-10, 170 pounds), and though he can be streaky, his bat is his best tool. He's a better runner on the field than in showcase events, but he's closer to average than above-average in that department. Defensively he gets the most of his ability, with his range and arm better suited for the right side of the infield than the left. He's agile, though, and a solid athlete. Gennett would be a crucial get for Florida State, if he gets there. Most scouts consider him a third-to-fifth round talent.
 
 
#155 ROBBIE ERLIN, LHP, SCOTTS VALLEY (CALIF.) HS
Erlin is a 5-foot-11, 170-pound lefthander from the Santa Cruz area, and several scouts have said the same thing about him: "If he were two inches taller, you'd be talking about him as a first-rounder." And while some scouts lament the cookie-cutter approach to drafting, it doesn't hurt Erlin as much because he's a lefty. Despite the small frame, he has life on his fastball, pitching at 89-92 mph. He commands the pitch to both sides of the plate and has an above-average curveball—a hammer he can throw for strikes in any count. He can get underneath his changeup a little bit, but it too has a chance to be above-average. Erlin is regarded as a great kid and is committed to Cal Poly.
 
 
#156 CARLOS RAMIREZ, C, ARIZONA STATE
At 5-foot-11 and 210 pounds, Ramirez turns off scouts with his soft body. But he has hit with authority everywhere he's played, and his defense gets solid reviews. Ramirez was a 34th-round draft pick by the Angels last year after hitting .386/.471/.660 with a wood bat for Chandler-Gilbert (Ariz.) CC. He turned them down and spent the summer in the Northwoods League, leading the league with 10 home runs and earning league MVP honors. While coach Pat Murphy used two catchers last season, Ramirez came in and made a seamless transition, quickly learning the new staff and starting every game this season. He calls his own games and worked with two of the best college pitchers in the country this year. While he's a good receiver, his arm is average at best. The wear and tear of catching didn't slow him down at the plate, as Ramirez hit .344/.449/.693 with 17 home runs during the regular season. He also has the swagger and leadership you look for in a catcher, getting respect from opposing coaches who say he's the kind of player you hate on another team but would love to have on your own team.
 
 
#157 COLE WHITE, RHP, NEW MEXICO
Like Washington's Brian Pearl, White is another third baseman that found success in short stints after moving to the mound. White came to New Mexico via Paris (Texas) JC, where he was a 30th-round selection by the Cubs last year. His fastball was consistently between 92-93 mph this spring, but he touched 95 on multiple occasions. White—who also co-wrote a song submitted for Grammy consideration—has improved his control throughout the year, but needs to clean up the moving parts in his delivery to continue that refinement. His 83-84 mph slider is a little flat at this point, mostly sweeping across the plate and not getting the two-plane break scouts look for. As a reliever in New Mexico, he's been a tough player to crosscheck, which could affect where he goes in the draft. He'll likely join a minor league starting rotation to get more experience, but profiles as a reliever.
 
 
#158 MIKE NESSETH, RHP, NEBRASKA
Nesseth and Nebraska both suffered through a disappointing spring, as he failed to make the transition from the bullpen to the rotation and the Cornhuskers had their first losing season since 1997. As a redshirt freshman reliever in 2008, Nesseth worked at 92-95 mph and touched 97 with his fastball. He also had a hard slider that overpowered hitters, and he showed both of those power pitches as a starter in the Northwoods League last summer. But he struggled in that role at Nebraska, moved back to the bullpen in mid-March and produced mixed results when he returned to the rotation five weeks later. Nesseth's fastball has varied from 88-90 mph to the low 90s, peaking at 95 when he worked in relief. His slider and control also have regressed and lacked consistency. His changeup is still a work in progress and it remains to be seen whether he can put everything together to serve as a starter20in pro ball. Nesseth uses his 6-foot-5, 220-pound frame to work downhill from a low three-quarters angle. The Cornhuskers had him watch tapes of Kevin Brown and A.J. Burnett, but to no avail. With a good spring, Nesseth might have pitched his way into the back of the first round. As a draft-eligible sophomore who hasn't per formed well, he won't go as high as his raw talent might dictate. The team that drafts him probably will monitor him during the summer in the Cape Cod League, waiting for his stuff to bounce back before making a significant investment in him.
 
 
#159 RYAN WHEELER, 1B, LOYOLA MARYMOUNT
Wheeler was a high school basketball teammate of North Carolina forward Deon Thompson. During his prep baseball career, Wheeler did little to impress scouts, but in the summer after his graduation in 2006 he began working with a local part-time scout who doubles as a travel ball coach. The sudden change in his hitting ability was striking. Wheeler blasted several long shots out of old Torrance Park in a home run derby during a summer showcase, and he has been hitting ever since. Now 6-foot-4 and 220 pounds, he batted .285 with five home runs in the Cape Cod League last summer and was batting .324/.429/.576 with nine home runs this spring. Wheeler has dabbled as a third baseman, but his long-term home should be at first, where he projects as an average defender. Scouts are most intrigued by his hitting ability, as he displays promising power as well as patience and an intelligent approach. Wheeler also gets high marks for his plate coverage, as well as his knack for driving the ball to the opposite field.
 
 
#160 NEIL MEDCHILL, OF, OKLAHOMA STATE
The Mets drafted Medchill in the 33rd round as a redshirt sophomore a year ago, failing to sign him after he led the Santa Barbara Foresters to the NBC World Series championship in August. He could go as many as 30 rounds higher this June to a team looking for a college power hitter. Some scouts grade his raw lefthanded power as a 7 on the 2-8 scale, and it's reminiscent of that of former Cowboy Corey Brown, an Athletics sandwich pick in 2007 who hit 30 homers in his first full pro season last year. Medchill has reached double figures in home runs in each of his two seasons at Oklahoma State after beginning his college career at Chandler-Gilbert (Ariz.) CC, and he'll deliver more power if he turns on more pitches and adds more lift to his swing. Like Brown, he has some holes in his swing and will strike out. Medchill has added 18 pounds in the last year and now carries 218 on his 6-foot-4 frame. The extra bulk has cost him a step and made him a slightly below-average runner, and he has an average arm. He probably fits best as a left fielder in pro ball.
 
 
#161 JOE GARDNER, RHP, UC SANTA BARBARA
Gardner first gained traction as a draft prospect with an excellent showing in Alaska last summer. A tall and lanky 6-foot-5, 220 pounds with a near sidearm delivery, Gardner is somewhat reminiscent of Tyson Ross, drafted last year out of Cal. His best pitch is his 91-93 mph fastball, which has natural heavy sinking action. His secondary pitches lag behind. He has some sink on his changeup but has trouble locating the pitch, and his curveball and slider have been mostly flat and rarely find the strike zone. Mechanics are also a concern with Gardner, who has a tendency to open up his front side too quickly and then land on a stiff front leg. If he improves his mechanics and secondary stuff, he could easily profile as a middle-of-the-rotation starter, though many scouts feel he fits best as a reliever, able to use his nasty sinker to induce groundballs.
 
 
#162 KYLE BELLAMY, RHP, MIAMI
Bellamy was a first-team all-conference choice in the Atlantic Coast Conference and was a key reason that Miami—unranked in the preseason—overachieved and finished in the ACC's top five teams. The Hurricanes have a long history of tremendous relievers, dating back to the Ron Fraser era (Rick Raether was the MOP of the 1985 College World Series) and enhanced during Jim Morris' Miami tenure, from Danny Graves and Jay Tessmer to George Huguet and 2008 first-rounder Carlos Gutierrez. Bellamy could work out better than Tessmer and Huguet thanks to a heavy, sinking fastball that is his trademark. When he's fresh, Bellamy works at 88-91 mph; he loses velocity when he works on back-to-back days, sometimes dipping into the 84-87 range. Bellamy's success as a pro will hinge on improved fastball command and improved consistency with his frisbee slider, which lacks depth and power.
 
 
#163 MICHAEL ZUNINO, C, MARINER HS, CAPE CORAL, FLA.
Zunino was yet another option for scouts trolling Florida looking for prep catchers. One didn't have to go far, as his father Greg is a California alum and has scouted for the 22 years, currently working for the Reds. Zunino's a solid athlete and average present runner (4.3 seconds to first base from the right side), whose calling card is his raw power. Zunino can put on a show in batting practice, and the last two seasons, he's carried it over into games. He broke his own school record of 10, set in 2008, this spring with 11 home runs, leading Mariner High to back-to-back district titles. A solidly built 6-foot, 185-pound righthanded hitter, Zunino has committed to Florida as part of the Gators' immense, impressive recruiting class. He has improved his chances of being bought out of school by making significant strides defensively. Whereas last summer he was not a clean receiver and dropped a lot of balls, he showed improvement in the fall and has the potential to be an average defender, with above-average raw arm strength. He has some baseball savvy from his upbringing that makes him even more attractive.
 
 
#164 PATRICK SCHUSTER, LHP, MITCHELL HS, NEW PORT RICHEY, FLA.
Schuster became the nation's best-known amateur this spring, even surpassing Stephen Strasburg, as he compiled a four-start streak of no-hitters. His attempt for a fifth straight game, a state playoff matchup was picked up by a local cable broadcaster, and his innings were shown on ESPN News. Schuster lost his bid and the game in front of a slew of fans, scouts and media, but his pitching ability was evident even in the loss. Schuster accomplished his no-hitter with the help of a funky delivery that delivers three average pitches. His fastball sat in the 86-91 mph range during the spring, as he threw both his two-seamer and four-seamer for strikes. His four-seamer seemed to get on hitters quickly due to his deception. His slider and curveball helped him miss plenty of bats en route to his no-hitter, and his slider is the better pitch, coming from his low three-quarters arm slot. Schuster's slight frame lends little future projection, and scouts agreed he might even lose some deception as he fills out physically. His pitchability gives him a chance to be a future back-end starter, and some scouts profile him more as a reliever. He's part of Florida's tremendous recruiting class and was expected to head to college unless a team meets his second-round bonus demands.
 
 
#165 MICHAEL OHLMAN, C, LAKEWOOD RANCH HS, BRADENTON, FLA.
Yet another prep catcher from Florida, Ohlman started to get national attention last fall playing for North Carolina's "Dirtbags" travel team, which featured Tar Heel State prep stars Brian Goodwin and Wil Myers. Ohlman showed premium power potential in the summer and fall and was snapped up in the early signing period by Miami. He's tall for a catcher at 6-foot-4, and his slender 200-pound body doesn't seem suited to the position for the long-term, scouts worry. But he has shown excellent athletic ability, and he should be able to remain a catcher at least through college. He has excellent arm strength, but his receiving skills are less advanced than his Florida prep rivals. He has improved his skills behind the plate but has a long way to go in terms of blocking, framing pitches and learning other nuances behind the plate. He's tall so he has some holes in his swing but has a good feel for hitting and hand-eye coordination. His best tool is his raw power, which might be sufficient for a move to a corner. Ohlman should be athletic enough to give outfield a try if catching doesn't take. He could go in the fourth-to-sixth round range.
 
 
#166 MATT THOMSON, RHP, SAN DIEGO
Big and physical at 6-foot-4 and 200 pounds, Thomson entered the 2009 season with high expectations and ranked 28th in BA's preseason ranking of draft-eligible college prospects. He and the Toreros had a disappointing year, though, and he finished the season at 5-5, 5.98 as the team didn't make regionals. Having spent most of the season as USD's Friday starter, Thomson encountered command difficulties, running up high pitch counts and falling behind hitters consistently. His stuff was good but not spectacular. His fastball sits in the 90-91 mph range, peaking at 92, but without a great deal of movement. He offers a slow curveball, sometimes starting a game with that pitch, and a slider and changeup fill out his arsenal. Drafted in the 22nd round by the Blue Jays out of Santa Rosa JC in 2007, Thomson has tinkered with his mechanics during his college career. His current version features a low three-quarters arm slot, with a kind of modified tilt to his delivery. His 2009 performance may have scouts concerned, but they still like size and arm strength. He'll need to improve his mechanics, sharpen his command and add movement to his pitches to have success in pro ball.
 
 
#167 JORGE REYES, RHP, OREGON STATE
Reyes has been a bit of an enigma for scouts. He burst onto the scene as a freshman and was the Most Outstanding Player in the College World Series in 2007, the second of Oregon State's back to back national championships. He hasn't matched that success or competitiveness since. While his 3.80 ERA this year looks a lot better than the 7.08 he posted last year, he's been inconsistent and scouts aren't sure what to make of him. On top of that, he's represented by Scott Boras Corp., which adds another piece to the puzzle. Reyes has been sitting 90-91 mph with his fastball this year, touching 93. He has an average slider, but lacks a third pitch, meaning some scouts have him projected to end up in the bullpen. Despite spending 11 days in jail last year for his involvement in some backyard, rifle-related mischief, scouts like Reyes' makeup. He's regarded as a good kid from a good family, but they believe there are similar pitchers out there that won't command "Boras money" and could see him ending up back at school next year.
 
 
#168 MILES HAMBLIN, C, HOWARD (TEXAS) JC
Hamblin is the best prospect on a Howard team that set a national junior college record by winning its first 57 games of the season. He was a righthander/third baseman when he joined the Hawks in the fall of 2007, and though he could touch 93 mph on the mound, his fastball was straight. Howard converted him to catcher and he has made significant progress in a short time. He has plus arm strength and good accuracy on his throws, and he has become competent at receiving pitches and blocking balls in the dirt. Though he shares time with Monk Kreder behind the plate, scouts consider Hamblin a far superior catcher. The 6-foot-2, 195-pounder also has made tremendous strides as a hitter. He arrived at Howard as a dead-pull hitter, and coaches had him focus on using the opposite field. He had an inside-out swing at the start of 2009 but was driving balls with power to both gaps as the draft approached. As a bonus, he bats lefthanded. He'll have to adapt to quality offspeed pitches and may have to spread out his stance more at higher levels. A former high school quarterback, Hamblin has good speed and athleticism for a catcher. If he doesn't turn pro, he'll attend Mississippi next season.
 
 
#169 JAMIE JOHNSON, OF, OKLAHOMA
Johnson was drafted in the 50th round out of a Louisiana high school in 2006, but went unselected at Texarkana (Texas) JC in 2007 and as a draft-eligible sophomore at Oklahoma last June. That won't happen again because he has developed into one of the better all-around college players in the Midwest. Though he stands just 5-foot-8 and 185 pounds, Johnson has the bat speed and surprising strength to hit=2 0for average and at least gap power from the left side of the plate. He needs to cut down on his strikeouts, especially if he's going to remain a leadoff man in pro ball, but he has the patience to draw walks and the plus speed to steal bases. His quickness also serves him well on defense, where he has good range in center field and a strong arm for the position.
 
 
#170 TUCKER BARNHART, C, BROWNSBURG (IND.) HS
Brownsburg High has churned out more than its share of prospects in recent years. Lance Lynn, a 2005 graduate, went on to Mississippi and became a supplemental first-round pick of the Cardinals last June. Drew Storen, a 2007 graduate, now attends Stanford and could sneak into the first round in 2009. Barnhart won't go as high as those righthanders, but he could be a fourth- or fifth-round pick for a club that isn't scared by his commitment to Georgia Tech. He's a switch-hitter with a good stroke from both sides of the plate and some power as a lefthander. He's strong for his size (5-foot-10, 180 pounds) and very athletic for a catcher. His speed is below average but he moves well behind the plate and is capable of playing the middle infield. He has soft hands and solid arm strength, and scouts laud his aptitude, instincts and work ethic. Some worry about his size and think he may be maxed out physically, while others think he has enough tools to eventually become a big league regular.
 
 
#171 DEAN WEAVER, RHP, GEORGIA
Weaver struggled badly as a starter earlier in his college career but started unlocking his talent in the New England Collegiate League in 2007. The league also featured Stephen Strasburg, the No. 1 prospect, and probable 2009 first-rounder A.J. Pollock of Notre Dame. Weaver doesn't figure to go in the first round, but he should be the second player picked from Georgia after first baseman Rich Poythress. He was better suited to the setup role he filled last season in front of Joshua Fields, as he uses a three-quarters arm slot to fire a pair of plus pitches that nonetheless aren't strikeout pitches. Weaver throws strikes with a two-seamer that varies in velocity. At times he runs it up to 96 and pitches at 92-94 mph; in other appearances, he sits in the upper 80s. His slider can be a plus pitch at times as well, with solid tilt. He gets plenty of ground balls and has given up just seven home runs in 118 career innings. Weaver has flashed a changeup, and his 6-foot-4, 211-pound frame could possibly handle the load of starting if he ever got another shot at it. He figures into the fourth-to-sixth round range this June.
 
 
#172 AUSTIN ADAMS, RHP/SS, FAULKNER (ALA.)
Adams could be the top prospect in NAIA this spring after lefthander Ashur Tolliver of Oklahoma City. He's shown a premium arm for several years at Faulkner, which retained him as a recruit even after Auburn offered him late in his senior season. Adams was drafted as a shortstop in 2008 as a 27th-round pick but he didn't sign and came back to school as a senior. He hit .389 with 14 home runs this spring, is an above-average runner with 4.05-second times to first base from the right side and has solid infield actions, with a chance to stay at shortstop as a pro. With all that, he'll be drafted as a pitcher. After relieving much of his career, Adams has moved into more of a starting role this spring and maintained the premium velocity he'd flashed in the bullpen. After hitting 95 last year, Adams topped out at 98 mph this spring and pitched at 91-96 mph, even as a starter, and showed the quick arm and athleticism to maintain that velo deep into games. He also throws a curveball and changeup, though scouts prefer the curve, a power breaker in the lower 80s. It has plus potential if he can improve his command. Lacking experience as a pitcher, Adams has plenty of refinements to make. His stuff tends to flatten out the harder he throws, helping explain how a NAIA pitcher with his velocity and breaking ball can go 5-2, 5.83 with ratios of just 8.16 strikeouts per nine innings.
 
 
#173 BRIAN PEARL, RHP, WASHINGTON
A converted third baseman, Pearl has flashed good stuff this year, but has also been wildly inconsistent in his first year of pitching full-time. The 6-foot-1, 190-pounder got two starts for the Huskies that didn't go well, so he mostly pitched out of their bullpen. A frustrating puzzle for scouts, sometimes Pearl would be 93-94 mph with his fastball and show a slider with good bite, while at other times he would come out and be in the mid- to upper 80s. He's not a big guy, but Pearl is athletic with a resilient arm. Control will never be his forte, though he can pitch on back-to-back days, has made good adjustments and shown body awareness that scouts like to see.
 
 
#174 ERIK STAVERT, RHP, OREGON
While teammate Drew Gagnier may be a sexier pick from a physical standpoint, Oregon's first player off the board is likely to be Stavert. Stavert gets heavy sink on a 89-92 mph two-seam fastball that's been up to 94. He commands the pitch well and also has a plus changeup that he'll throw to righthanded or lefthanded hitters. Like his fastball, the changeup also gets good downward action, giving him two pitches hitters pound into the ground. Stavert's breaking ball is a work in progress. Right now it's a slurvy pitch in the 77 mph range and pitching coach Andrew Checketts has been working with him to refine it as either a true curveball or a true slider.
 
 
#175 SEAN BLACK, RHP, SETON HALL
A converted shortstop who pitched sparingly until his senior year at New Jersey's Lenape High, Black burst onto scouts' radars in 2006 after running his fastball up to 95 mph, and the Nationals took him in the second round of the draft that year, but he turned down an above-slot offer to enroll at Seton Hall. He has not developed as hoped with the Pirates, posting a pedestrian 4-6, 3.99 line as the staff ace this spring. Black pitched in the 89-93 range most of the spring, sitting around 90-91, but he touched 94-95 in the early innings of several starts down the stretch. Now and then he'll show an average or slightly better curveball, but he has not been able to repeat the pitch. He also flashes an average changeup, but he struggles to throw it consistently with the same arm speed as his fastball. Scouts are divided on his arm action—some have no qualms with it, while others say it's too short and fluttery in the back. The bigger problems with his delivery are issues of balance and tempo. An organization that regards those things as fixable—and some do—could take Black in the top five rounds, but he will not approach the signing bonus he turned down coming out of high school.
 
 
#176 KYLE HANSEN, RHP, ST. DOMINIC HS, OYSTER BAY, N.Y.
Hansen's older brother Craig was a first-round pick by the Red Sox out of St. John's in 2005 and was later dealt to the Pirates in the 2008 Jason Bay trade. The consensus among scouts is that Kyle has better stuff now than Craig did at the same age. Hansen works in the 88-93 range and has touched 94 with a lively fastball. It's easy to project him to add velocity as he fills out his gangly 6-foot-7, 190-pound frame. WIth that kind of size, it's no surprise that Hansen has a funky, upright delivery, and he tends to stride open and drop his elbow. Hansen's high-70s to low-80s slider fluctuates from a 35 offering to a 50 pitch on the 20-80 scouting scale, but some scouts project it to be above-average in the future. He has some feel for a changeup and a split-finger but throws both sparingly, and it's difficult to distinguish between the two. Hansen's upside is huge, but most scouts believe he's likely to honor his commitment to St. John's, where he could easily blossom into a first-round pick in three years.
 
 
#177 JONATHAN MEYER, C, SIMI VALLEY (CALIF.) HS
Meyer is a versatile player whose draft stock has risen steadily as the season has progressed. A solidly built 6-foot-1 switch-hitter, Meyer has played shortstop and third base as well as catching. And as a pitcher, his fastball ranges from 87-91 mph, peaking at 92. Meyer's  curveball is serviceable and could develop into a plus pitch. But his future is likely as a position player. He has the frame and arm to be an outstanding catcher. Yet his hands and fielding actions have improved immensely over the past year, and he flashes the playmaking ability to be an average to plus defensive third baseman as well. Meyer probably does not have the speed or quickness to play short, but second base is also a possibility. He is a recent convert to switch-hitting, and while he shows promise he has more power—and is more comfortable—from the right side.
 
 
#178 JOSEPH SANDERS, 3B, AUBURN
First-year Auburn coach John Pawlowski was a big league pitcher, but his teams at College of Charleston and now Auburn are known for high-octane offenses with all-or-nothing approaches at the plate. Several highly-regarded sophomores at Auburn struggled this spring with lots of strikeouts, but Sanders, a junior, responded to the approach and was having a tremendous season, ranking second in the Southeastern Conference in home runs in April. But on April 21, he was struck in the jaw with a pitch, and while his jaw didn't need to be wired shut, it was broken. Sanders, whose mother Barbara spent 25 years in the Air Force and went through cancer treatments in 2008, showed his toughness by returning less than a month later for the final series of the season against Alabama. He went 2-for-11 in the set, mashing his 19th homer in the final regular-season game. Sanders' bat is his best tool, as he has hand strength and solid plate coverage. He's played third base and second in college, and he's just an adequate infielder, with erratic footwork. His arm plays at either position, but he may not have the hands to stay in the infield, making him more of a utility player in the Ty Wigginton mold. He has enough speed to make a shift to the outfield possible, but he'll have to be more patient for his power to play in pro ball; he walked just 33 times in 128 college starts. The lack of college hitters may push him into the first six rounds anyway, if he's signable.
 
 
#179 BUDDY BAUMANN, LHP, MISSOURI STATE
Baumann battled his control last spring as a sophomore but straightened it out in the Cape Cod League, where he won the all-star game. He had arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the fall but bounced back quickly—and strongly, winning Missouri Valley Conference pitcher of the year honors by going 11-1, 3.23 with 101 strikeouts in 86 innings. Baumann is small (5-foot-10, 175 pounds) and doesn't overpower hitters, but he can pitch. He's willing to work inside with his fastball, which sits at 89-91 mph early in games and dips to 86-89 in the later innings. He gets good life on his pitches from a three-quarters delivery, and he can drop down lower to confound hitters. His curveball and changeup are solid, and he does a nice job of mixing his pitches to keep batters off balance. He'll vary the shape and speed of his curve, making him even tougher to decipher. "If he were 6-foot-1," one scout said, "he could go in the second round." He's more likely to go in the fifth or sixth.
 
 
#180 GRAHAM STONEBURNER, RHP, CLEMSON
Stoneburner, a redshirt sophomore, has lacked consistency in his performance, though not with his velocity. He consistently hits 94 mph with his four-seamer, a sign that he's come back completely healthy from a torn ACL and back injury (fractured vertebra) from high school that caused him to miss his freshman season. At times, Stoneburner is just an arm-strength guy, with scattershot command and below-average secondary stuff. At other times, he throws strikes to all four quadrants at 94-95 mph, stays tall in his delivery well for a 6-foot, 185-pounder and keep the ball in the ballpark, as he'd allowed only two homers all spring. At times he shows some power on his slider, which still needs to add depth and tilt and doesn't project as anything more than an average pitch. His ability to pitch off his fastball was more successful in the bullpen, which was his primary role once the calendar turned to April. His changeup is a bit better than his slider, though it lacks life and is as straight as his fastball at times.  Stoneburner's feel for pitching also is inconsistent, but his consistent velocity is as good as any college righthander in the Southeast, and he generally throws strikes, if not quality strikes. He had just 17 walks in 56 innings.
 
 
#181 EVAN CHAMBERS, OF, HILLSBOROUGH (FLA.) CC
Originally committed to Florida after prepping in the Lakeland, Fla., area, Chambers wound up at Hillsborough CC after getting just eight at-bats in 2008 for the Gators. At 5-foot-9, 215 pounds, he has been getting compared to Kirby Puckett and Kevin Mitchell since his high school days for his short, thick, strong body. He's athletic and an above-average runner, which explains in part why he was a 19th-round pick of the Rockies out of high school in 2007. Chambers' thick frame helps him generate surprising raw power, which played with wood last summer, when he hit seven homers in the New England Collegiate League with Keene (N.H.). His speed helps him play a passable center field, and his arm is below-average but good enough for center. The whole question with Chambers is how he'll hit as a pro, as he has bat speed and has shown the ability to hit good velocity. He also has a choppy swing and some issues with pitch recognition. Scouts that think Chambers will learn to lay off breaking balls out of the dirt could push for him in the first five rounds, leaving those who doubt his bat—and have him turned in as a sixth-to-10th rounder—missing their chance.
 
 
#182 DANNY REYNOLDS, RHP, DURANGO HS, LAS VEGAS
One of the biggest pop-ups in the southwest this year was Danny Reynolds, a righthander at Durango High in Las Vegas. Reynolds has the stigma of being an undersized righty—5-foot-11 and 160 pounds—which will scare some teams away. Durango head coach Sam Knapp has been a Reynolds believer for years, always telling scouts that he had the hand speed to show bigger velocity numbers. This year, Reynolds proved him right. His fastball was 86-88 mph in the fall, but something clicked for him this spring and he was consistently sitting 93-95. He also has a slider that is 77-81 with some late bite and will mix in a slower curveball. There's some effort to his mechanics—he has an extremely fast tempo, turns his back to the hitters and has some spinoff, ala Francisco Rodriguez. Reynolds has also run on his school's cross-country team and has an intense work ethic—even after the lights have been turned off at his stadium after games, Reynolds can still be found on the field, running poles. Committed to Dixie State College, he's considered signable and will likely be selected in the top five rounds.
 
 
#183 DUSTIN DICKERSON, 1B, BAYLOR
Dickerson projected as a possible second-round pick coming out of high school in 2006, but signability concerns dropped him to the Nationals in the 15th round. Scouts loved his sweet lefthanded swing but didn't like the adjustments he made at Baylor, as he spread out his stance and became more of an opposite-field hitter. He batted just .303 with seven homers in his first two seasons. Dickerson has started pulling more pitches again this year, maximizing the strength in his 6-foot-4, 205-pound frame. He led the Bears with a .381 average entering NCAA regional play, fashioned a 24-game hitting streak and had hit 10 homers. He has a patient approach at the plate and makes consistent contact. Though he's reasonably athletic and runs well for his size, most of Dickerson's value lies in his bat. A high school third baseman, he moved to first base at Baylor and is only an adequate defender. His offensive potential could get him drafted as high as the third round.
 
 
#184 IAN KROL, LHP, NEUQUA VALLEY HS, NAPERVILLE, ILL.
Krol entered the year as the top-rated prospect in Illinois but never threw a pitch for Neuqua Valley High. He was suspended for the entire season in March after his second violation of the school's athletic code of conduct. He was found in the presence of alcohol when police pulled over the driver of a car Krol was riding in for suspicion of driving under the influence. After performing well on the showcase circuit last summer, he has spent this spring pitching in a scout league in Wisconsin on the weekends. Scouts who like him project him as a lefty who'll have command of three average pitches, while others hold his size, velocity and makeup concerns against him. Krol's out pitch is his hard, two-plane curveball, and some scouts grade his changeup as his second-best offering. He sat at 88-90 mph on the showcase circuit last summer but has pitched more at 86-88 mph this spring. At 6-foot-1 and 180 pounds, he doesn't project to add much more velocity, though he get s good sink on his fastball from a low-three-quarters angle. Krol has committed to Arizona, which will honor his scholarship despite his suspension. He projected as a possible third-rounder at the start of the season but now figures to go closer to the sixth round.
 
 
#185 TANNER POPPE, RHP, GIRARD (KAN.) HS
Poppe was much better known as a football and basketball star before he hit 93 mph at the World Wood Bat Championships in Jupiter, Fla., last fall. He had been recruited by NCAA Division I-A football programs as a tight end before giving up football as a senior, and he led Girard to runner-up finishes in the last two Kansas state 4-A basketball tournaments. His athleticism is evident on the mound as well, as he uses his 6-foot-6, 220-pound frame to throw low-90s fastball with little effort. Poppe is still a work in progress on the mound, as he works mainly with his heater and still is refining a curveball and changeup. He's an outstanding student, so he could be difficult to sign away from a Kansas scholarship. Poppe may not be signable enough to go early in the 2009 draft but could develop into a premium pick for 2012.
 
 
#186 DALLAS KEUCHEL, LHP, ARKANSAS
Keuchel has been a solid contributor for Arkansas since hi s freshman season and has stood out in the Cape Cod League, leading the summer circuit in innings pitched in 2007 and earning all-star recognition in 2008. The 6-foot-3, 200-pounder has picked up a little velocity on his fastball in the last year, now working in the high 80s and touching 91, but he remains a finesse pitcher. He gets good sink on his fastball and locates it well, enabling him to set up a changeup that grades as his best offering. His curveball is fringy, though that's less of an issue for a southpaw who will face righty-dominated lineups. He doesn't have as much stuff and size as former Razorbacks lefty Nick Schmidt, a Padres first-round pick in 2007, but Keuchel has the same competitive edge and workhorse mentality. His pitchability and determination could make him a No. 4 starter in the big leagues, and he could get drafted as early as the fourth or fifth round.
 
 
#187 SHAVER HANSEN, SS, BAYLOR
Texas colleges are rife with professional second-base prospects, either players who currently man the position (Texas A&M's Brodie Greene, Rice's Brock Holt) or who figure to move there from shortstop (Hansen, Dallas Baptist's Ryan Goins). Hansen is the best of the group because he has the most polished bat. After hitting nine homers in his first two seasons, he has exploded for 16 this season entering NCAA regional play, a school record for shortstops. He takes a big swing and has sacrificed some strike-zone discipline for power. He did hit a solid .273 with wood bats in the Cape Cod League last summer. A 6-foot, 185-pound switch-hitter, he gets good leverage in his swing from both sides of the plate. Hansen is a below-average runner with a fringy arm, which is why he'll move off shortstop once he turns pro. His instincts make him an effective baserunner and defender. He profiles as an offensive second baseman or utilityman, and he has shown his versatility by starting for the Bears at second base as a freshman and third base as a sophomore.
 
 
#188 LOUIS COLEMAN, RHP, LOUSIANA STATE
One of the best college seniors in the 2009 draft, Coleman has starred in three of his four seasons at Louisiana State, though he went from starting on Friday nights as a freshman to scuffling in the bullpen as a sophomore. Things got so bad in 2007 that the Tigers tried to convert him into a sidearmer at the end of the season, but he got back on track when he returned to a low three-quarters slot early in 2008. He has gone 19-3 the last two seasons and was named the Southeastern Conference's 2009 pitcher of the year after taking an 11-2, 2.84 record with 111 strikeouts in 98 innings into regional play. His fastball usually sits at 88-92 mph with good run and sink, and he has touched 95 as a reliever. When he stays on top of his slider, it's a solid pitch. Hitters have trouble picking up his pitches because he throws across his body and has a low arm angle. He throws quality strikes and competes. The 6-foot-4, 190-pounder has served as both as starter and reliever for LSU. He projects in the latter role as a pro because he works primarily with two pitches and has a resilient arm, and he should move fast as a reliever. Coleman has been drafted twice previously, in the 28th round out of high school by the Braves and in the 14th round last June by the Nationals.
 
 
#189 BRETT WALLACH, RHP, ORANGE COAST (CALIF.) JC
Wallach is the son of Tim Wallach, a 1979 first-round draft pick who was a longtime major leaguer with the Expos and Dodgers. Brett  possesses a nearly ideal frame for a pitcher; at 6-foot-3 he's lanky and projectable. Right now his fastball ranges from 88-89 mph, and his body promises more velocity in the future. His secondary pitches are excellent. Wallach features a slurve, which when thrown well has quick and late break. His changeup is his best pitch, showing sudden late drop while thrown with the same arm speed as his fastball. He  has a smooth delivery, and his fluid arm action permits the ball to leave his hand easily. Wallach presents scouts with a complete package. He combines a big league lineage, projectable frame, smooth delivery, and an excellent feel for three pitches.
 
 
#190 DEVIN FULLER, RHP, CHANDLER-GILBERT (ARIZ.) CC
Fuller redshirted his freshman year at Arizona State because he was academically ineligible. Transferring to Chandler-Gilbert this season, Fuller has shown flashes of the talent that made him a 14th-round selection by the Devil Rays out of Gilbert (Ariz.) High in 2007. His fastball has been anywhere from 88-94 mph this spring and he gets a lot of run and sink on it. His secondary stuff is a bit behind and he's been going back and forth between throwing a curveball and a slider, although the rotation on his breaking pitches is getting tighter and he shows some deception with his changeup. The 6-foot-2, 225-pounder went 3-2, 2.36 with 72 strikeouts and 21 walks over 53 innings for the Coyotes this season.
 
 
#191 ROB GILLIAM, RHP, UNC GREENSBORO
Gilliam could move up draft boards if he has strong workouts for teams, as he's an arm-strength pitcher who hasn't had a great deal of success in college. He grew up in San Jose, Calif., but moved to Chapel Hill, N.C., as a senior in high school and wound up staying in the area for college, attending UNC Greensboro. Playing in the extremely offensive Southern Conference, Gilliam has been a member of Spartans' rotation for three seasons. He consistently shows average to plus fastball velocity, touching 94 mph regularly and usually sitting in the 89-93 mph range. He has enough control and secondary stuff to lead the SoCon with a .224 opponents batting average, and he ranked seventh in strikeouts with 78 despite working primarily in relief. Gilliam throws a slow 12-to-6 curveball that has its moments, and the fact he's shown the ability to spin the pitch gives scouts some hope for his breaking ball. His changeup showed plus potential in the Cape Cod League last summer in shorter bursts. When he misses, he tends to miss up and was homer-prone, giving up 10 this spring. He wasn't easy to scout at UNCG, where he made 20 of his 24 appearances in relief and frequently pitched multiple innings out of the bullpen. Scouts like his toughness and see him in the bullpen down the line. He should go in the five-to-seven round range.
 
 
#192 DANIEL TUTTLE, RHP, RANDLEMAN (N.C.) HS
Tuttle overcame injuries from a severe car accident when he was 12 to become an Aflac All-American last summer. The 6-foot-2, 195-pounder plays shortstop and pitches in relief for his high school, and North Carolina State had signed him to perform a dual role for the Wolfpack. But a velocity jump this spring has Tuttle's college career in doubt, as he's likely headed for the first six rounds of the draft. Scouts have mixed feelings on Tuttle, who does a lot of things wrong in his delivery but delivers the goods nonetheless. Using a slinger's low-three-quarters arm angle, Tuttle throws across his body and lands on a stiff front leg. For some clubs, all of those are red flags. Tuttle still generates premium velocity and an attractive, sweeping slider despite (or because) of it all. His fastball sat in the 90-93 mph range with good sink this spring, and at times he ran it up as high as 96-97 mph, with plenty of 94-95s as well. His slider occasionally has depth as well, though more often it's a sweepy chase pitch rather than a plus offering. He has shown a slow curve and changeup as well but both are below-average. He's a power arm signable in the first seven rounds.
 
 
#193 LUKE MURTON, OF, GEORGIA TECH
The younger brother of former Georgia Tech star and big league outfielder Matt Murton, Luke Murton is a bigger, less athletic version of his brother. At 6-foot-4, 228 pounds, he's actually 20 pounds lighter than he was his first three years of college. Murton struggled to live up to the family reputation early in his career, striking out 95 times between the 2007-2008 seasons, when he hit 21 homers combined and was drafted twice (33rd round, 2007 as an eligible sophomore, 40th round 2008). Already 23, Murton doesn't have a ton of upside, but he does have righthanded power, more athleticism in his lighter frame and enough arm (it's fringe-average) and speed (below average) to play left field as a pro. He was solid as Georgia Tech's right fielder in 2009 after mostly playing first base or DH for the majority of his college career. His weight loss also has quickened Murton's bat, and he's trusting his hands more instead of constantly cheating on fastballs. That's allowed him to make more consistent contact and use the whole field. As a result, he entered the NCAA tournament with career-best numbers (.370, 17 HRs, 33 BB, just 28 SO). With plus righthanded power and the ability to stick in the outfield, Murton should become a draft factor in the fifth-to-sixth round as a top senior sign.
 
 
#194 CHRIS RUSIN, LHP, KENTUCKY
Rusin can't reach the mid-90s like Kentucky teammates James Paxton and Alex Meyer (projected first-rounders in 2009 and 2011, respectively) but he pitched both of them this spring. He finished his career ranked second in career wins (23) and strikeouts (274 in 302 innings) in school history, and he should be one of the first college seniors drafted this year. Rusin had a chance to go in the first five rounds in 2008 before coming down with a sore elbow shortly before the draft. He had arthroscopic surgery in the fall to repair a slight tear in a tendon and has been as good as ever this spring. Six-foot-2 and 190 pounds, Rusin primarily works with a lively 87-89 mph fastball and a curveball. He'll need to improve his changeup to succeed as a starter in pro ball. He doesn't have a pretty delivery, but it adds deception to his pitches without impairing his ability to throw strikes. He repeats his mechanics well, though some scouts wonder if they could lead to more arm problems down the line.
 
 
#195 RANDY HENRY, RHP/SS, SOUTH MOUNTAIN (ARIZ.) CC
Hailing from Arnett, Okla., Henry was slated to attend Texas Tech after high school. But he blew out his elbow, missed his senior season after having Tommy John surgery and ended up at South Mountain (Ariz.) CC. He's played second base for the Cougars this year, but his future is likely on the mound. At 6-foot-3, Henry has clean mechanics from a three-quarter arm slot. Just 18 months removed from surgery, head coach Todd Eastin gave Henry a very soft landing this year, allowing him to pitch out of the bullpen. Over nine games, Henry pitched just 11 innings this season. Because of his limited time on the mound this year, Henry has been tough to see, but those that have seen him walked away impressed. His fastball has shown good life, sitting at 90 mph every time out and even touching 94-96 late in the year. While Henry threw mostly fastballs and changeups this year, when he regained the confidence to throw a breaking ball, scouts said it was an above-average pitch with great tilt and snap.
 
 
#196 JONATHAN SINGLETON, 1B, MILLIKAN HS, LONG BEACH
Singleton first came to the attention of scouts and college recruiters in the summer of 2007, when he was 15 and with a wood bat, he blasted a 400-foot home run out of Inland Empire's ballpark. His frame and natural hitting ability have impressed scouts, though his results have lagged behind. At 6-foot-3 and 200 pounds, Singleton has an impressive build, and his large, strong hands indicate natural power potential. He has a sweet, fluid swing, and his bat speed produces an audible "whoosh" as he swings at a pitch. He has struggled to connect with quality pitching at showcase events, and an early-season slump this spring drove down his stock. His backswing can get wrapped and unnecessarily long, leading to problems making solid contact. As the season has progressed, though, Singleton has warmed up. He impressed a group of 30 scouts in an Easter tournament game by ripping several base hits. He has excellent defensive skills, and should be an above-average defender at first base. Singleton is just 17, so a club that thinks it can draw out his terrific natural hitting ability can be patient in developing him. He could also shoot up draft boards in three years if he opts for Long Beach State instead of pro ball.
 
 
#197 TRENT STEVENSON, RHP, BROPHY PREP, PHOENIX
Stevenson has the kind of body scouts dream on. In 2005, Stevenson was a 5-foot-10, 125-pound shortstop. He's sprouted up considerably since his freshman year and now stands 6-foot-6. Still rail thin at 165 pounds, he's been pitching at 88-91 mph, but was up to 93 in the fall. He also showed great command in the fall, but has been inconsistent this year. His slider has looked sharp at times, but has also been inconsistent and he has a tendency to drop his arm slot when throwing the pitch. He's a bit of a wild card in the draft. As a player who is still growing into his body and is relatively new to pitching, teams are baking on the projection with Stevenson. Scouts and college recruiters reported that he seemed to be a bit overwhelmed with the attention he received this spring and think he may end up at college.
 
 
#198 BRIAN JOHNSON, LHP, COCOA BEACH (FLA.) HS
Scouts often lump Johnson and David Holmberg into similar discussions because both are lefthanded, big-bodied Florida Gators recruits. Johnson, whose sister Brooke plays softball for the Gators, had a dominating prep season, posting a near-2.000 OPS as a hitter for Cocoa Beach High while going 5-1, 0.76 with 102 strikeouts in just 55 innings on the mound. Johnson is big-bodied and physical at a listed 6-foot-4, 220 pounds, though many scouts consider him a bit shorter and heavier than his listed weight. While he lacks much in the way of projection, he could improve the quality of his stuff as he improves his conditioning. However, his present stuff is pretty strong. His fastball grades out as fringe-average for a lefthander, in the 85-89 mph range, and he's touched some 90s. He throws both a curveball and a changeup, and his curve is his most advanced pitch. It's a 12-to-6 breaker that works as a strikeout pitch when it's thrown with some power in the mid-70s. It could be a plus pitch down the line. Johnson's velocity wasn't consistently strong this spring, and he's not exactly a fast-twitch, quick-armed pitcher. He profiles more as a back-of-the-rotation innings-eater. Johnson also put out word that he anticipates going to college unless he's blown away financially. He's a top 200 talent but may not be drafted until late due to his signability.
 
 
#199 BEN CARLSON, OF/1B, MISSOURI STATE
Carlson stands out for his size (6-foot-3, 230 pounds) and strength, which he has shown off by leading the Missouri Valley Conference in homers in each of the last two season. The younger brother of Tigers minor league first baseman Chris Carlson, Ben has effortless lefthanded power and the ball jumps off his bat. Though his average dropped from .379 a year ago to .301 this spring, he makes good contact for a slugger and shows patience at the plate. Carlson has spent most of his time in right field this season after playing first base as a freshman and DHing as a sophomore. He injured his elbow in summer ball in 2007 and had Tommy John surgery following the 2008 season. Though he's reasonably athletic for his size, he's a below-average runner who will move back to first base in pro ball. A team looking for a proven college slugger could pop him in the fourth or fifth round.
 
 
#200 KYRELL HUDSON, OF, EVERGREEN HS, VANCOUVER, WASH.
It's a down year for Washington's high school players, and teams have split opinions on the state's top prep prospect. On pure athleticism, Hudson rates as one of the best in this year's class. He's a lean but strong 6-foot-1 and 185 pounds. His best tool is his speed, as he runs a 6.4-second 60-yard dash and can get from home to first in 4.3 seconds. If he attends Oregon State, he plans to play both baseball and football. The biggest question with Hudson is if he'll hit. He's raw, sometimes looks overmatched against good pitching and struggles to square balls up even in batting practice. There are more non-believers than believers, and as one scout put it, "I've still never seen a guy steal first base." If the bat doesn't develop, his arm is good enough that putting him on the mound could be a fallback option. On top of the questions about Hudson's bat, scouts aren't sure how much he likes baseball. At times he has shown up late to games, or he sits in the dugout while his teammates shag flyballs and doesn't show any fire. One scout witnessed Hudson lollygagging a five-second time to first base on a groundball to the shortstop, with a team's general manager in the stands. Hudson is a definite project, and some scouts wonder if he'll be overwhelmed by the grind of a minor league season.