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Angels Organization Report

Bill Shaikin -Premium Content

The Angels have done well developing pitchers, catchers and infielders. They haven't done much with outfielders lately, aside from buying Vladimir Guerrero, and they haven't developed an impact outfielder since producing Tim Salmon, Garret Anderson, Jim Edmonds and Darin Erstad a decade ago. The latest best hope is a kid who has yet to turn 20 or play a full season of pro ball. The Angels cast their eyes toward Rookie-level Orem center fielder Peter Bourjes.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

Angels Organization Report

Bill Shaikin -Premium Content

The Angels appear set at shortstop, with Orlando Cabrera signed through 2008 and Brandon Wood slugging away at Double-A Arkansas. They like Erick Aybar at Triple-A Salt Lake too, although they included him in trade offers for Miguel Tejada and Carlos Lee. But they'll almost certainly add another middle infield prospect to their 40-man roster this fall.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

Angels Organization Report

Bill Shakin -Premium Content

The Angels had their share of stars in the World Baseball Classic, including Bartolo Colon pitching for the Dominican Republic and Francisco Rodriguez for Venezuela. They also had Michael Collins catching for Australia. He did not start for Australia and isn't close to the major leagues, but the Angels have high hopes for him.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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TEMPE, Ariz.—You won't find too many 19-year-olds with a grand total of two Rookie-level games on their professional resumes in big league camp, but in Nick Adenhart the Angels feel they have a special case. Adenhart, a 6-foot-3, 185-pound righthander, was projected as a first-round pick in 2004 until an elbow injury ended his senior season at Williamsport (Md.) High that May. Though they knew he would need Tommy John surgery, the Angels chose Adenhart in the 14th round and gave him second-round bonus money: $700,000.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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LOS ANGELES—The signing of righthander Jeff Weaver not only rounded out what should be a strong big league rotation for the Angels, but it also reduced any pressure on his younger brother Jered to try to make the big league team out of spring training. General manager Bill Stoneman rated it as an outside chance for Jered to make the big league squad even before the team signed Jeff. Now Jered, the 12th overall pick in the 2004 draft, can just relax and soak in the lessons from his first spring training.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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LOS ANGELES—If Nick Gorneault's career path were to continue on its current trajectory, the 26-year-old outfielder would hit about .300 with 30 home runs and 120 RBIs for the Angels this season. Of course, the chances of that are as remote as Bengie Molina leading the league in stolen bases. Vladimir Guerrero and Garret Anderson are entrenched at the corner outfield spots in Anaheim, and the Angels made a two-year, $3.275 million commitment to Juan Rivera, a reserve outfielder and the team's primary DH, virtually assuring Gorneault a ticket back to Triple-A Salt Lake this spring.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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ANAHEIM—After the Angels won the World Series in 2002, they went shopping for a reserve outfielder. Eric Owens signed up happily, hoping for the chance to participate in the playoffs for the first time. Owens started the year slowly. By the time he started hitting the Angels had long vanished from contention, and they finished 19 games out of first place. The team released Owens after the season, and he never played another game in the major leagues.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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ANAHEIM—In the years before Arte Moreno, Vladimir Guerrero and Bartolo Colon, Angels general manager Bill Stoneman made a name for himself by assembling quality bullpens on the cheap. The Angels paid longtime closer Troy Percival handsomely, but Stoneman shuddered at seven-figure salaries for set-up men and plugged in an assortment of minor league free agents, waiver claims or promotions from within. Within the past two years, however, the Angels have lost five promising relievers on waivers. Righthanders Bobby Jenks and Derrick Turnbow emerged as closers, Jenks for the White Sox and Turnbow for the Brewers.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports

AL West Organization Reports

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Life's pace ambles by a tick slower in Tifton, Ga., as compared to the fast pace of Atlanta, three hours north. And patience has long been a virtue of Tifton native Nick Green. The 21-year-old righthander spent two years in junior college, another half-season in Rookie ball and the first six weeks of his 2005 season in extended spring training. In mid May he was summoned to pitch out the bullpen at low Class A Cedar Rapids, and by August had pitched his way into the starting rotation, where he next helped pitch the Kernals into the playoffs.

Majors | #2006#Los Angeles Angels#Organization Reports